"Ustedes pueden mantener la dirección."

Translation:You can keep the address.

5 years ago

201 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

"You can maintain the direction." is just awful English. Not that it's bad grammar, just unnatural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cogbon
cogbon
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It gets worse: "Y'all can maintain the direction" is also accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrainInAVat
BrainInAVat
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"ya'll" isn't "bad English." It's just occurs in some dialects of English and not in others. It just happens that those in privileged positions typically speak dialects in which it does not occur.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cogbon
cogbon
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Never said that y'all was bad English...just poking fun at the overall sentence like Daniel was, that's all

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrainInAVat
BrainInAVat
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No worries. Sorry I misinterpreted your intent. Cheers! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lanievjo
lanievjo
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Y'all is used in my part of the country. Lots of people say y'all. Some of my friends have accents.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/8stringfan

Maybe it's due to growing up in eastern NC, but I think "Y'all can maintain the direction" sounds much better :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

That's exactly what I put.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SmokeyIX
SmokeyIX
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I think it's strange that "y'all" is accepted while "you" (with all implied) isn't.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExponentBot

Well, yall is slang and shouldn't be accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"yall is not slang, but it is from the American south, And it is not standard English. There are many variants of English, and English learners have toe be expected to learn dozens of variants'

My friends from the south might say "yall", but that is not what they write, especially when writing formally. Once an English learner becomes expert in standard English, they may want to learn the dozens of variants. But first help them learn standard English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnGorenfeld
JohnGorenfeld
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How about "you can keep going this way"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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To be exact, that would be something like "Ustedes pueden seguir así."

Which actually makes more sense than Ustedes pueden mantener la dirección

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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I tried "you can keep going the same way" (which wasn't accepted), but thinking about it there are situations where you can maintain a direction without going anywhere.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbiss

I think it's fine. I can see myself saying this while sailing. It's a bit formal and you could argue between the and this, but grammatically it seems good.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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It's not "awful" nor is it unnatural. It's simply something you probably haven't used yourself, but does it come up in an internet search? Yes, it does.

https://www.google.com/#newwindow=1&psj=1&q=%22You+can+maintain+the+direction%22

It yields two pages of results.

"You can maintain the direction of a relationship with an original object however you want. Change pointers are written and data is distributed. A relationship not ..."

"When working a geometric design, it is sometimes helpfuL to rotate the canvas a quarter turn as you stitch, so you can maintain the direction of traveI."

"However, before you turn right and cross the field, if the climbing wore you out and you are ready to quit, you can maintain the direction you were on and the trail ..."

There is nothing awful or unnatural about these sentences. They all make sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

In each one of the examples you provided, these words were part of a phrase. The example exercise was a stand-alone sentence with a period (full stop) afterwards. Now, I'm sure you're going to find an example where there is a period after these words, but notice how the first examples that you provided to the "natural"-ness of these words were all part of a phrase.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tubeoftoothpaste

agreed. it is quite frankly a ridiculous sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

It's formal, but not ridiculous I'd say. I am pretty sure I've heard a very formal driving instructor instruct a student to 'maintain the direction' . Ha.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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In a submarine:

crew: "What course do you want us to take captain?"

captain: "You can maintain the direction."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

I agree with both Daniel-in-BC and tubeoftoothpaste, totally.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnGorenfeld
JohnGorenfeld
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I could see Captain Kirk using the phrase. "Maintain course, Mr. Sulu."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Or "maintain your bearing , Captain Starbuck, said Ahab. Thar she blows."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Anyone who quotes Melville gets a lingot from me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlphaC3

"Truth is in things, and not in words." Probably one of his most famous quotes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Added my lingot to the bucket.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

Aviation directions: turn right 90 degrees and maintain the course of 135 degrees. Why not, then.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billywm
billywm
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19 results isn't a lot out of a hundred gazillion webpages on the Internet. If anything, that's further evidence of how unusual and uncommon this phrase is.

There's over 50,000 results for "colorless green ideas sleep furiously" but it's still nonsense :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Unfair example; that particular nonsense phrase can be almost be considered a single entity. There's only two results for "colorless pink ideas sleep furiously". (I had to go through several colors to find one that wasn't a takeoff on Chomsky's phrase.)

I agree that it's an unusual phrase, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Oddly enough, the same thing in Spanish yielded no results.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeardropExplodes

I'm not sure finding stuff on Google proves the sentence in natural - they all sound well weird and I doubt whether the examples you found were by native speakers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Many of them, if not all, were by native speakers, even if the sentences were jargon used by seamen. As BarbaraMorris pointed out, "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" is an example from a famous linguist who was discussing how a sentence can be denotatively correct in a syntactic sense but have no connotative and/or colloquial meaning. What I mean is that he deliberately concocted this sentence so that it would have no logical meaning, which is why it is unfair to compare it to a sentence that does have a logical meaning to seamen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

I believe they were by native speakers, but it still doesn't make them a normal/natural sentence. Like the very first person in this discussion said, it may be grammatically correct, but that doesn't mean it is how most people would say it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

I agree that the sentence isn't awful; it's simply unnatural. I can't imagine a situation in which a native speaker would say the sentence as is, without qualifying "direction" somehow (of a relationship, of travel, you were on, etc.).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Thank you for the great examples!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I agree. Within the right context, it's fine.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franzsalvatierra

If it's any consolation, this is a poorly written, unnatural sentence in spanish too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I found a couple examples in news. Are these also poorly written?

"De hecho, las hormigas pueden mantener la dirección norte yendo hacia adelante (cara al norte), hacia atrás (cara al sur), o hacia los lados (mirando hacia el este o hacia el oeste)."

"Los portales web que utilizan un nombre de usuario único pueden mantener la dirección de correo electrónico original, sensible a mayúsculas, en su base de datos, de tal forma que se utiliza el usuario para el proceso de autentificación y el correo electrónico para la confirmación de la inscripción y para la recuperación de la contraseña."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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If you want immaculately manicured phrases in a high literary style you're in the wrong place.
I'll keep saying this (or something similar) as long as I'm here: The purpose of these exercises is to learn when and how to use what word where. Which phrase translation stays in your mind the longer, the clunky weird one or the plain ordinary one?
Once you understand the appropriate use of a word then you can make up your own phrases ... weird or not is up to you!

Personally, being a child of the sixties, I like "Keep on keeping on." :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This course is used by more people than just native English speakers learning Spanish. It is also used by Spanish speakers continuing to learn English after they have completed the "Quiero aprender inglés (yo sé español)" course. And by people who don't have either English or Spanish as a native language, but who know English well enough to use this course to learn Spanish.

So if we improve the English translations of the Spanish sentences, we can strengthen the course for those folks.

I'm currently taking the "Quero aprender inglés course" myself after completing this one, and I find it very useful to see the comments in the sentence discussions about the Spanish translations being wrong or awkward.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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great point, about the sentence discussions being useful!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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Agreed. I've heard 'maintain one's heading,' but this sentence is nonsense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/3Spanish5Me

I knew it wouldn't be accepted, but I put "You all can stay true"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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But it becomes completely clear if you add the word "compass" before it. Most people know what a "compass direction" is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineAnn

I put "You can keep the address" Like if you change internet provider but they let you use the same email address. It was accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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PaulineAnn: I am your lost twin. Answered the same way with the same rationale in my brain. To think that DL brought us together!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodwisteve
bodwisteve
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I also wondered if address would be the better translation. So much in the comments about direction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thearifeldman

This would perhaps make more sense as, "You can stay the course," no?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeradGraham

Directly translated, it seems like something you would say to someone steering a boat

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

Or coming from a driver ed/pilot instructor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I think you're right, but I also think the phrase "stay the course" is used metaphorically in English to describe someone who finishes what they start and/or endures hardship of some kind: "He stayed the course and got his graduate degree" or "She stayed the course because her children were counting on her."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dogon3
dogon3
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I would say it to a pilot of an aircraft.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidrosa.tt

yip!!!! you can stay the course should be accepted as correct also

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

I'm not sure I agree with that. Maintain course or direction implies what your current bearing or heading is, while staying the course implies that regardless of which directions you might end up along the way, that the precise meaning is that you will follow that possibly meandering but well-defined course to its logical end.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarionHorr
MarionHorr
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Doesn't "stay the course" have an element of stamina in it? So "you can stay the course" could be translated as "you are physically capable of completing the (predefined) course"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'm sure there are many alternatives. Thank you all for bringing some of them to our attention. Would you have done so if DL had simply accepted every possible variation?

Your suggestion, thearifeldman, made me think "you can stay your corsets" but I wasn't expecting that to be in DL's database either! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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As a sailor, I didn't see this sentence as particularly odd. I might give the tiller (that's the stick used to steer the boat) to someone else and say something like that. However, it's obviously odd to many other people. I'm getting to used to Duolingo giving sentences that are grammatically correct but virtually useless in everyday life. So I am no longer spending my time trying to imagine strange circumstances in which a weird sentence could make sense. Instead, I will just try to learn the meaning of the individual words, so that I can use them in different sentences for situations where they are more normal. There are other sources for good examples of normal conversation and I will use those along with Duolingo.

For those of you with creative minds who like the challenge of thinking of uses for sentences like this - kudos to you! I don't have the imagination for it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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There you have it: a perfectly normal (though uncommon) usage of this phrase. Stop crying and open your minds.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I'm no sailor but I've always known the nautical use. Maybe that's because I am from a seaside region where, if you don't personally know a sailor, you likely know someone who does.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Can a native Spanish speaker please tell us the case where you would ever use "Ustedes pueden mantener la dirección."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

In some other sentence. .. they said that 'dirección' means address while 'rumba' and 'orientación' mean direction

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

No, rumba is the dance. You mean rumbo, which means course or heading or direction, while in Spanish dirección most frequently is used to mean one's address.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Generally, dirección means address...Even here they use another word for direction Very odd

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I thought the sentence was idiomatic for "You can stay the course," but it was not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I believe that "stay the course" is a perfect translation. I hope someone reports it and that DL, with its millions of reports, will find time to add it to the correct translations list. Yes - it means to maintain the same direction.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Gracias.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/perlafantastica

another example of dulingo offering a possible translation...address ....and then saying that it is incorrect.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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Not all possible translations of a word fit in all sentences

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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You should use the context to figure out which translation makes the most sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ianbezek

None of them made sense in this case. lol

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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While it may not be colloquial "You can maintain the direction." (You can keep going in that direction) is acceptable and does make some amount of sense. "You can maintain the address.", however, does not really make sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Now it lists "You can maintain the address" as one of the correct answers when you make a mistake. I just reported that they shouldn't accept that. The fix should have been to remove "address" from the hints, not to accept a bizarre translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

A divorcing couple, standing in front of the mansion with a vintage Rolls Royce in the driveway. He looks at his soon to be ex-wife, smiles, then says "You can keep the address, but I'm taking the car. Disregard the gorgeous blond holding my suitcase"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Ok, I'll buy "keep", but I still maintain (heh) that "you can maintain the address" is weird.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

If she will maintain (water the yard, mow the yard etc) the address and I still get the car, I"m good. I just can't say it in Spanish. I actually don't think I'd get away with that in any language :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You're welcome to your yard, I'll keep my garden! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

I just tried to work out what Duolingo wanted and put in 'you can maintain the address' which was accepted, but makes absolutely no sense. When would I use that phrase? What does it mean, even? But then, I also can't anticipate ever saying 'I want an elephant' or 'the cats eat all the rice'!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arghratings
arghratings
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I don't know exactly how the hints work on duo, but address is very definitely a correct translation of "direccion". As such, if the hints aren't based on the context of the sentence, then address needs to stick around. If they are based on the context, that's a different matter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlphaC3

Would 'you can just keep going in this direction' be a more 'normal' translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4
Multi0Lingual4
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Difference between "rumbo" and "dirección"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manin
manin
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What about "You can keep the course."? This seems more idiomatic in this case.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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Sounds good to me. I wanted to say "You can keep going this way", but I was out of hearts and it didn't sound literal enough to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbbindle
bbbindle
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Sounds like a good translation. Suggest it next time. We gotta teach em real good English! My sympathies for your hearts...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"You can keep the same course" sounds ok to me. "You can keep the course" sounds awkward. (At least half of the English translations in this unit seem awkward to me - I think these idioms are being translated too literally.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Badamente

I wrote, "You can stay the course," and got it incorrect. Is this right though?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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In sailing terms, maintain the direction would mean stay the course. The latter is more sailorly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Not really...It is a fairly colloquial way to say more or less the same thing in English, but it is not exactly what it says, IMHO.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizinmi

The drop down on mantener notes that it can be translated as maintain or support, but when I used the word support, I got a caution message to be sure not to confuse maintain and support.....?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pianoxxxx
pianoxxxx
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This is not correct English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebekahSch3

In another sentence in this section, "Él perdió la dirección" is translated as "He lost HIS way." Now "Ustedes pueden mantener la dirección" is translated as "You can maintain THE direction." Can anyone explain why "You can maintain YOUR direction" was counted as wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

My take is that native Spanish speakers would instead say "él perdió el rumbo."

Not to be a bummer about it, but listen to the tower to airplane discussions about directions that come from the recent Brazilian soccer team plane crash. Rumbo, rumbo and more rumbo...not a single dirección or curso or whatever. Qué es su rumbo, capitán? And then there is "vectores!" meaning heading, speed, and rate of descent, which is another, more specialized variety of direction(s).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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If "Él perdió la dirección" is translated as "He lost his way" in DL, then it might be a mistake, even though it sounds better than an accurate translation. "He lost the way" is more accurate. I hope you reported it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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RebekahSch3 is correct to question this.
"your direction" would be a correct interpretation if dirección has been established as a personal possession.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheOriginalObbl

Yes, at the very least "your direction" sounds somewhat natural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4
Multi0Lingual4
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No, that doesn't sound natural at all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OldBen44
OldBen44
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Sorry, but I don't understand your English here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

It really frosts my flakes to know that "to be able to" is one of the principal translations of poder, yet Duolingo tells me that it doesn't know or believe that "you are able to maintain your direction" is correct.

I like Duolingo overall, but overly restrictive answer sets like this are more than a little bit annoying, and every so often I hear slightly slurred or mispronounced words, and no I am not talking about things like: Ana anda al parque, which naturally gets run together as Anandal parque, per Yates, Correct Your Spanish Blunders, among other sources.

If there is such a thing as a language lawyer, Duolingo is a language beancounter.

And just one example of audio wierdness. One sounds like Es un play or Es umplay.

But what is it really supposed to be? That second syllable that gets flattened out to a short u sound is what the Spanish word "simple" is supposed to sound like according to Duolingo. What happened to the idea that in Spanish the "i" makes a longish "e" sound, as in "seem-play"?

I try to give direct feedback for most of these, but tend to go to discussion only occasionally. But this morning is a pain in the butt, just because I have hit several such things. Sometimes I can see it coming and just plow through by giving only the translation that I suspect Duolingo believes is the only correct translation, but other times I just keep wanting to put in translations that I know (and Spanishdict.com confirms) are correct synonyms, even though that can turn Duolingo into verbal whack-a-mole at times.

There, I feel better after getting that off my chest. But I'd feel better if I could get a witness, or better yet witnesses, in hope of getting Duolingo to check its work a bit more. And yeah, I know the price is right, but Duolingo still wants me to spend my learning time on their site. Pero por eso, necesito un poco más con los corecciones, y un poco menos de borderline incorrect pronunciation, or even intonation, as when a question is verbalized in a flat, statement type of phrasing, only to find out that they intended it to be a question instead.

And yes, I have read the comments. And no, I don't want to post a discussion every time I find one of these annoying errors, but I do want to go on record in hope that somebody at Duolingo will begin filling in these potholes on the information highway.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liana234833

No one would ever say that in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tforsyth23

Many people are complaining about the translation of this sentence. You are failing to understand that this is a simple program designed to introduce you to many basics within the language. Many phrases in this program are not actually said in Spanish speaking countries. Also, many phrases we say in English are not said in Spanish. Learn the basics here and then actually study Spanish or speak with native speakers. AND STOP COMPARING SPANISH TO ENGLISH. It only frustrates you. Many people on here need to chill with the ethnocentrism as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I agree about chilling with the ethnocentrism, but I don't agree that we shouldn't discuss whether something is actually said or not. When I took the reverse course, Spanish -> English, I found it very useful to read the comments about how the Spanish was awkward or wrong.

I'm pretty sure that Duolingo has a discussion attached to every sentence for the very purpose of allowing us to discuss the nuances of the sentences. For sure there's often a low signal-to-noise ratio in these sentence discussions, but for me, the "what does this really mean" aspect of the discussions is very useful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaPoot
AnnaPoot
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I don't understand why "you" is not accepted instead of "you all" - in other places ustedes translates to you

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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The official answer is "You can maintain the direction", so it seems like "you" should be accepted. Maybe you got something else wrong in your answer and it decided to give one of the "You all" possible answers as the "correction".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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I was also turned down with only "you" writing "you can keep the direction"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eweller

you all should also be accepted as a translation for Ustedes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katieruthland

Y'all is. I put in frequently...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I love that DL accepts "y'all" as a plural "you"! I have a campaign of one to have "y'all" accepted in "standard" English as the plural "you." "You" as both singular and plural is just too confusing!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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I vote instead to bring back thou as the singular you because thou art lovely.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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Yes, let's have every colloquial and idiomatic way of saying "you" (plural) included in the answers.

"you lot" (english) "youse 'uns" (Northern Irish) etc. etc.

oh, don't forget all their spelling variations too!

<h1>idiotic #middle_english</h1>
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

And thy English art lovely as well, fair maiden MissSpell.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Couldn't "Thou art lovely" mean the same as "y'all are lovely"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Back in the day.... ok, earlier than that... 'Thou' was singular, and 'you' was plural. 'Y'all' is plural. So, thou and y'all are not interchangeable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Thy logic is irrefutable, MissSpell.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I'm never exactly sure how to use "y'all". If thou canst use it when speaking to just one person, then yes. If not, then what MissSpell said.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Llarona

But my Louisiana (USA) family uses "y'all" when addressing even one person, and I think it's used commonly in this way in the Southern U.S.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

LLarona, in my experience, when someone says y'all when speaking to a single person, they are saying out of famous Southern hospitality. That is, if they say to you, why don't y'all come by Saturday around three or four for a picnic?" they are doing so to let you know that they aren't just inviting you, but are inviting you to bring a friend or some family as well.

And I have this on fairly good authority, having been made an honorary Coon@ss in my time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Why not just say "all of you?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katieruthland

Yeah! The south shall rise again!

jk, yanks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

In that case, maybe they should accept 'youse' - for all the Scousers out there!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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Yes, the plural "you" is different from the singular "you" in Irish gaelic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeardropExplodes

Yes,and it isn't just Scousers, Irish and some Americans say yous as well. It's funny how some people look down on this as bad but it is actually really useful at times to distinguish the plural as many other languages do. I wonder if this has an origin in a plural form of you in Irish Gaelic. Anyone know?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Duolingo never excepts "you all". Drives me nuts. If they accept "y'all" which is not a real word, then they should definitely accept the real words. Otherwise they should not accept words like "it is", "was not", "can not", etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I agree Vicki. "Y'all" is a contraction for "you all" so if one is right the other is right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Hey vicki,kura! It grates on me, but y'all is as real as the people who use it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladyg

Whatever the dictionary definitions for individual words, I am struggling to understand the meaning of this translation. It may be an idiom in Spanish, but this translation makes no sense in English, as far as I can tell.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbbindle
bbbindle
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Mantener la direccion means to keep going in the same direction. You might say this if you were giving instructions to someone about how to get somewhere. You might also say "keep going straight" in English, but I doubt Duolingo would accept that because is isn't literal enough.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I think Duolingo will fail in its ultimate purpose (to create more people who can translate the web) if it doesn't figure out a way to teach us idioms. As it is now, they not only allow us to translate idioms literally (and awkwardly), they pretty much force us to, if we want to keep our hearts and finally complete the lesson.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I don't think it will fail, as long as people can be flexible enough to translate the web pages literally initially, then turn their translations into acceptable English. A lot of what I've done in the immersion section is to read the Spanish, then the translation, then edit the translation for more natural English, without changing the meaning. That's the advantage of crowd-sourced translations. This area is strictly for learning, so sometimes the translations almost have to be awkward.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

I figure with 10 million folks and growing, if any system has a chance at translating the web it would be DL.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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It isn't an idiom, though. "You can maintain the direction." is basically just another way of saying "You can keeping going in that direction."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Right. I'm not sure why I said that in this thread.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Perhaps because Duolingo does seem to have a lot of idioms, but what's worse are the awkward sentences. Anytime I "don't get" a sentence I google it in Spanish, so that I can read it in an article, and some of the phrases have 0 results!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

What I do, michisjourdi, is insert the Spanish sentence I don't understand into Google Translate. Then, I experiment by deleting the words I do understand. Sometimes, what's left is a clue to what the meaning should be. That's how I was able to translate "Wikimedia Commons alberga contenido multimedia sobre Zapatillas de ballet. Commons" into "Wikimedia Commons contains multimedia content about ballet slippers." When only the words "alberga contenido" were left, the English translation was "contains content." That was all I needed to cue me to insert "multimedia" between "contains" and "content."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Another response to michisjourdi here. I've been kicking around the conceptual differences b/t what constitutes an idiom and what constitutes a colloquialism. As far as I can figure out, both constructions baffle the students learning the second language. Idioms use words in a technically correct way that is also confusing in a literal way, such as in the anecdote about the German tourist who was removed from a USA plane when he announced that he "wanted to make a bomb." After two hours it was determined that he wanted to defecate. Obviously, this was both a euphemism and a literal translation of a German idiom gone wrong. Colloquialisms are similarly confusing, except that sometimes they are similes and/or make use of nonstandard or vulgar language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See my post to Theairfieldman, ladyg.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"You can stay on course" refused.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArielleM123

I think it would be fine to skip saying "the" in order to express a general statement. Like, "You all generally maintain direction well."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahJohnson12

would "you can go straight on" (i.e, giving directions) be a reasonable translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

This is an unusual. A more common way of saying this in English would be "You can keep going in the same direction." That should be added as one of the options, although it does add a word. The above is NOT clear all by itself given the context assumed in this lesson.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milus38

"you can keep the address" was accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashley2446

There are so many words for direction, can anyone help show the differences?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExponentBot

"you can maintain direction" does not work here! It is like you can maintain the direction of vehicles or people. Why doesn't it allow it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExponentBot

"you can maintain direction" does not work here! It is like you can maintain the direction of vehicles or people. Why doesn't it allow it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ochera
ochera
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can I use "la orientation" insted of direction"? (No accent is available )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkGilbert232

Direction is most always plural when used in reference to a map or "directions". 1) go down to the end of the street, turn left 2) the nest stop sign turn left again. 3) go 3 miles.

I give direction when instructing one in life.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Derchanmann16

As for this sentence I say this to it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGtY1aPrOMQ

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spellings_22929
spellings_22929
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so mantener is both to keep and to support?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasCharlie

Would "mantenar" also be follow or is it only maintain?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoonIwill2

"Ustedes" means You all and pueden means ustedes or they can. So saying ustedes is "you" and pueden is for "you can" doesn't make any sense. Even worse, when I put "You all can maintain the direction" it was wrong! Also, "You all can maintain the direction" is not a good sentence. I mean, who says that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

why not "you are able to keep the direction" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudyVixil

You're not really serious about this translation, are you? "Maintain the direction" Try "You can continue in this direction." This is what my native-speaker experience tells me. This program is not supposed to be correcting my English. I've noticed that even though I know a more colloquial or "native" utterance I need to stick to a more inappropriate direct-translation utterance, in both Spanish as well as English, in order for duolinguo to count it as correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen581800

I was under the impression that "direccion" meant "address" and that "rumbo" was "direction."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamenLucier

This is a really terrible translation. If you phrased it as a question it might make sense "Can you maintain the course?" or as a declarative sentence "Maintain the course" But certainly not the way that it is currently phrased. BAD ENGLISH.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dyan380938

I said "You can maintain the course" but was told it was "you can maintain the address" which didn't make any sense to me at all. Any thoughts?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jami-lynFe

Poder also means "to be able to" so I'm wondering why "You all are able to maintain the direction" isn't acceptable.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L.Watford

I agree I have never heard anyone say anything close to that.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chapultepec17

what in the jesus is this

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahGilson

What does this mean?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chericher

What new sorcery is this?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlos970483

I put " you can keep keep the direction" and got it wrong

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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well maybe because you wrote "keep" twice ;-)

besides this it sound good for me ...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarionHorr
MarionHorr
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Funny how the translation from Spanish to English does not now allow the translation given, but insists on "you all". British English does not have the phrase "you all" when addressing a plural you, and I think the same is true for some parts of the USA.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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I wrote "you can keep the direction" and was turned down and corrected by "you ALL can keep the direction" Sorry "ustedes" is to be translated by "you" - even if it is plural. Surely you can translated by "you all", if you want to stress the plural. But it never can be wrong just to put "you"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/montee2015

So now it requires me to add "all" as in "you all". Haven't had to do that before.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarionHorr
MarionHorr
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Yes, and that is just plain wrong. I encourage you to report it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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MarionHorr is absolutely write. A few times I also was forced to add „all“. That’s nonsense. If you want to stress the plural you CAN add it. ... If it occurs again —> report it. I’ll do the same.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaBerger

Can't you say "They"? Because its ustedes puedEN not puede for "you" ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It's true that it would be "pueden" for "they", but since it actually has "ustedes", you have to say "you".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnmarkos
johnmarkosPlus
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What does, "You can keep the address," mean? I don't even know.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnmarkos
johnmarkosPlus
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What is an address? There is the intangible concept of an address. "You can keep the address," might mean, I wrote the address on a slip of paper, and you can keep that slip of paper. And yet, that's a pretty meaningless thing to say.

Or, an address might refer to a house, so, "You can keep the house?" That seems like a rather drastic and unusual thing to say.

"You can keep the address." Such a strange thing to say.

I like the "You can maintain course in the same direction," or "Maintain course in the same direction (Mr. Sulu)," translation. That's the gist of the version that I got wrong, according to Duolingo.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScubaDyer

You can remain in charge?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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No, it's more like "you can keep going in that direction"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

I agree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aparidon

Is this the spanish equivelent of saying "keep going that way."?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See my response to Theairfieldman.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Malcogida

It's so unnatural translated into English that I thought they meant ' you can keep the directions' -as in 'you can hold on to the written directions'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/51gringo

Neither of the correct answers makes sense or would be considered good English. Yes or no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Read the above discussions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mortisimago
mortisimago
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we now have orientacion, rumbo and direccion (sorry, no accents) that all can mean "direction" . Can someone please summarize the differences in context in which they belong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It seems like you need a good dictionary. Try Word Reference/Collins which has lots of examples of usage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlynnGrace

I agree english needs a plural second person pronoun. in Australia we say "youse"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

No you don't! Only a very few Australian people would ever say that. I am Australian and the only people I've ever heard use it were from the country areas.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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The thing that gets me is how the regional versions of a second-person-plural ("youse," "y'all") are seen as "low", when they're actually filling a major hole in our language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Most people would not consider there to be a "major hole" in our language. A plural form of "you" is seen as unnecessary as the context of the sentence, when spoken, makes it plain whether one or more people are being addressed. The only reason people are using it in the DL sentences is because Spanish differentiates between "you" singular and "you" plural, and therefore we feel obliged to pluralize the English, to show DL that we know that they are using the plural form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diego.Alatriste

Once you start to fully grasp the meaning and purpose of the subjunctive, it is easy to see that there is indeed a major hole in our, that is, English, language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

Why is ustedes "you all?" Where did the all come in? And why not "you are able" instead of "can?" Keeping an address is VERY different from maintaining a direction.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

Reported as being unnatural, and suggested that they accept "You (all) have a sense of direction." That.. seems to be what this sentence is saying at least? It's pretty unclear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I hope they don't accept it with the "(all)". "Ustedes" just means "you". "Todos ustedes" means "you all". (Aside from the dialects of English where "y'all" is used, where "all y'all" means "todos ustedes"..)

About "sense of direction", I don't think that's what the Spanish sentence means. Even if it's talking about the ability to keep a straight course, I think that's different from having a sense of direction.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

Yeah probably. It's definitely confusing.

I'm gonna quibble on the "you all." English doesn't have a second person plural, except for you all/y'all. And the thing about the internet is you get people from all over, so you can't rule out that whoever's typing doesn't speak the dialect of English you're talking about.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nomdeploomy

....right?

1 year ago
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