"Дайтемне,пожалуйста,хлеб."

Translation:Give me bread, please.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mechanise
mechanise
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I said "give me, please, bread" and that was refused. any idea why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacob_sangi
jacob_sangi
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In Russian right the accusative case, an object can come st the end of the sentence. So, how we say in English "give me bread , please ", would be the Russian equivalent of saying "give me, please, bread". Notice that Russian sentences can be altered by putting the object after "мне" or after "пожалуйста".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeVinDuRosier

мне is dative & хлеб is accusative, is that right ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pye20
pye20
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To give (to)... - Давать/дать + dat ‧ in Russian, instead of saying 'to you', they say the word 'you' in it's dative form: many common verbs that can have an indirect object, and most correspond with the English use of the word 'to': ‧ en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Russian/Grammar/Dative_case

Дайте мне, пожалуйста, хлеб. ‧ [ ~Please give bread to me ]

Дайте ‧ Verb ‧ Дать Perfective Imperative conjugation
мне ‧ Indirect Object ‧ Я ( I Me ) Dative declension [ Give to me ... ]
пожалуйста ‧ Interjection
хлеб ‧ Direct Object ‧ Accusative declension ( same as Nom ) ‧

Дать conjugation ‧ cooljugator.com/ru/дать

Nominative: я
Genitive: меня
Dative: мне
Accusative: меня
Instrumental: мной, мною
Prepositional: обо мне

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/level.zero

Is 'pass me' not an acceptable translation for 'дайте мне'? That's what my Russian speaking friends always told me it means, now I'm having trouble relearning it...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivaristal
Ivaristal
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"pass me" ≈ "передайте мне". The verbs are similar, but "дайте" is more universal

"Передайте мне соль, пожалуйста" — "Pass me the salt, please"<- you can say at the dinner, if the salt is too far from you. But if you say "передайте мне хлеб, пожалуйста" at the bakery, it will sound pretty strange. And "дайте мне хлеб, пожалуйста" sounds normal, that sentence means that you want to buy the bread (if you are at the bakery) and that the bread is located too far from you (at dinner).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergioAndr658303

Thanks a lot, you are right

15 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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level.zero

The trouble with your sentence is that while most of the time it works and is used that way, on some occasions it doesn't apply.

Suppose you are in situation where the person taking your order for bread is not the person who gives it you. You show up at the bakery warehouse with your truck and give them your order. You say...give me some bread... A few minutes later you go down to the loading dock and pick up your pallet load of bread.

In a typical dining situation the pass and give words are interchangeable. But the words are actually different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuairidhIrwin

I said "Give the bread to me please". What's wrong with that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergioAndr658303

Because we are not talking about a specific bread

15 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKevinDalton
JohnKevinDalton
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Why is give me please the bread? Wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haggra
Haggra
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The word order is unnatural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/not_a_thing
not_a_thing
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In Russian or English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurisvrijn

Would: "Give me a bread please" be alright here as well?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peatsickle

"Bread" is an uncountable mass noun in English, so no. You could ask for "some bread," or "a piece of bread," or "a loaf of bread," but not "a bread."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamie1531
Jamie1531
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FYI, there are uniqe situations when "a bread" would be acceptable in English. Going into a bakery and szying "I need a bread today." While it sounds sloppy, a local baker would understand. He'd then ask what kind of bread you want.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isiah190

Being that an object CAN come at the end of a sentence, would it matter where the object is put in the sentence? If possible, where else could хлеб go in the sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuliyaKitcune

дайте мне ХЛЕБ ,пожалуйста

дайте мне пожалуйста ХЛЕБ

Хлеб дайте мне, пожалуйста

дайте ХЛЕБ мне, пожалуйста

How do you like more?)) everything is correct here ;))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Horror_panda
Horror_panda
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What case is "мне" and what case is "хлеб"? which is the accusative and what is the other? I thought мне would be dative but my mom confused me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuliyaKitcune

It's accusative, your mom is right. Дайте (кому?--dative) мнЕ (кого?что?--accusative ) хлеб.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottled1

Here word order is unimportant, supposedly, but "sometimes" it matters. Another random Duolingo "rule" we are just supposed to somehow know?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rwhaller42

I agree. Would some Russian who is an expert please explain why they are different in meaning rather than in the placement of "пожалуйста". I suspect this is just an error of the code that agrees with or rejects answers. I often get a "correct, another way is..."

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katiocha

The sentence is also possible without " мне" : is there a difference? Does the pronoun make it less abrupt?

3 months ago
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