https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco

Repeating out loud?

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I was reflecting on how I review using Duolingo and Memrise and realized something very simple. There are times when I review to pass the time, waiting for an appointment, on a bus, etc. I sit and tap away silently. When I'm at home, I read aloud every Spanish word on the screen. It's after these sessions, no matter how short, that I find it easiest to speak Spanish. I think it loosens up my tongue and my brain just a bit.

Does anyone else repeat the exercise aloud? Do you find it makes a difference for you?

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nate1016
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When you read aloud what you are leaning, it helps you brain to remember and take in more information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkrobe
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This discussion makes me smile. I am using various online sites in my trek toward trying to learn conversational Spanish. I listen to MP3 lessons to continue learning as mental focus permits while on long solitary walks. I speak aloud when home (as dog dutifully watches with curiously cocked head) and on my walks WHEN I think no one will notice. It helps that I start my walks in predawn hours before most are up. But, that may also make it worse when someone does see me. I visualize the image they see of an old man in need of help while walking in the dark talking to himself. No one has yet approached me about this, nor called the police, but some may wonder. I still continue my daily minimums on Duo and now have a native Spanish speaking barber that loves speaking with me. She also loves my tip. It's good to see all ages on Duo. I will be 74 next month. Yesterday evening, as I was renewing my library card, my librarian told me, "You have two more years." I asked her how she knew. She responded, "I meant on your new card." Keep trudging!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie803560

Dkrobe You are really lucky to have your Spanish barber to talk with. Wish I had someone free to talk on a regular basis with. My future son-in-law and family are from Venezuela hence learning Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkrobe
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Yes, I am lucky to have my Mexican senora as my barber, and she gives a good haircut. But, the time for a once per month haircut is not nearly enough exposure for much learning. It does give me time to try speaking what little I know. Congratulations on the upcoming wedding which may give you much more time in a Spanish speaking environment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Mod
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That is really an inspiring story. Do you mind if I share it with my students? They sometimes need to be reminded that the journey of language learning never ends.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkrobe
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Share as you wish. I would be honored. But the real story is not that I started the journey so late; rather, how strongly I wish I had started at least 60 years earlier. I am now trying to convince my professional musician son to trade music lessons for the services of a native Spanish speaking nanny for my one year old granddaughter.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4003Tom
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Haha. Got a laugh out of this. When walking or otherwise out in public you can pretend to be on your phone. People will be impressed that you are able to carry on a conversation in a foreign language! If holding a phone interferes with your walking you can wear a headset. Or just continue talking to yourself and let them wonder! We have a lot of hispanics in our area and I will seek some out. For now there is a woman who is Spanish speaking and works at the pharmacy. She was delighted to know that I am trying to learn. Of course I only see her once or twice a month. Love your librarian comment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkrobe
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Yesterday morning, I was engrossed in “my” MP3 Spanish lesson while walking the predawn half of my morning walk. I was walking a bike trail next to a highway when I was stopped by a red light. As I waited for the light to change, I continued trying to answer aloud the professor’s questions to a very apt student. I was surprised by another walker that caught up with me from behind. Giving me wide berth, he turned and ran across the highway. When our lights changed to green, we both continued in the same direction on different sides of the street. There was a hint of embarrassment, but then I remembered your sage advice. I continued walking, listening, and talking aloud to myself in the dark. It felt good. Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazztonight

I am reminded of Richard Feynman's admonition and book title, "What Do You Care What Other People Think?"

He was able to achieve great things with that attitude.

Please keep walking, listening, and talking aloud. You are an inspiration to all!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sibhreach

Sí! I realised a couple of weeks back that the more I actually vocalise the words, it does help. Being that we're not in a classroom structure (where you're forced to repeat after your teacher - at least I was when I was in class!!!), it's so easy to keep quiet and just do your lessons. Not a good method to learning a language - you need to speak up! :)

Granted, you may get some stares if you're on the bus, but make the effort to at least whisper/mouth the words for your lessons. It helps - and good luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Mod
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The classroom structure with forced repetition and instant feedback is very underrated. As a Latin teacher I know what a language student needs, but sometimes forget to apply it to my own studies :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grammytotwo

I've tried so many times to learn Spanish with no success! Duolingo is great because I can keep repeating the lessons. I really think not speaking out loud was one of the problems in the past. I am forcing myself to always repeat out loud and to speak what little I know to primarily Spanish speaking people. Sometimes they laugh, but then they try and help me!! I can't believe that at 68 I'm finally getting it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El_Mercielago

Yes, I speak the lessons aloud whenever I can. But if I'm at work or it's late at night I do not. And I disable the microphone lesson option.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ebspains
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I repeat the words out loud because I know it will help me to memorize the words faster. It does make a diference. If you associate words with images, I think it helps a lot. Also, if you know a language similar to Spanish, you will see it is easier, I think.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SherryFromSF

I repeat it aloud at home, too. I think it has to do with engaging more parts of the brain. The more of your brain you engage, the better you learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clingonsurfer

Absolutely it helps, though i'm not sure my dog is convinced! I'm sure she thinks i'm losing it.. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alvie_x
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I only read out loud when I use Memrise as the speed of the audio is faster on that site. I tried to keep up with their speed and finally understood the lisping and slurring... it was simply easier to lisp and slur than not when talking at such a fast speed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4003Tom
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I say the words aloud most of the time. Even when the question is to translate the words I repeat along with the recording simultaneously until my pronunciation and speed match up fairly well with the recording. I think that helps me more than anything.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie803560

Hola, Dan D8. Yes I repeat after them also. I also write every thing down and the English even if it is just one word. When I get new words, I write them on the top of the page with the English then continue with the lesson. Sometimes I look up the words in my language app for translations first, other times I click on to them as I go along. I now have reams of Spanish words/sentences.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NinjaFishSticks

I always repeat it! I found myself doing it the other day. Even when it just asks me to translate it, I still say it out loud just to get a feel for the word. I want to get practice saying it so that I know I am able to pronounce it correctly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaGringaCubana

Same for me, a lot of my DuoLingo time is spent in places it's not appropriate to have audio playing or speak out loud. I try to only do review in those instances, and not learning of any new pronunciations. I keep that for when I can speak loudly and clearly.

I also communicate daily by text and email in Spanish but from Cuba voice time is expensive, so less opportunity for me to practice speaking.

At this point in my learning, I'm better at reading and writing in Spanish but when I'm with native speakers, I still need them to speak slowly.

Compared to immersion (6 weeks a year in Cuba), RosettaStone and Babbel, I have learned more Spanish in a few weeks than years of a combination of the 3 other learning methods.

10 months ago
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