"Что нам приготовить на обед?"

Translation:What should we cook for lunch?

November 12, 2015

113 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

Why doesn't this mean "what are we cooking for lunch?"?


[deactivated user]

    This sentence doesn't have a subject (it would use a nominative case, «мы»). Instead, it's a subjectless sentence similar to «что нам на́до пригото́вить на обе́д», but with «на́до» dropped. It can't mean «what are we cooking for lunch?».


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frazer_124

    Sorry, could you explain this in a bit more detail? Why is the sentence subjectless? I mean I understand that the 'надо' is implied, but why wouldn't you just use a normal SOV construction instead, like 'что мы приготовим на обед' - is the subjectless version just more idiomatic? And doesn't 'надо' mean need, so would a more literal translation be 'what do we need to make for lunch'? Sorry to bombard you with questions!


    [deactivated user]

      You're asking me, and I feel somehow obligated to answer, but I have absolutely no idea how to answer your question.

      Why this sentence is subjectless? Well, because it is.

      Why don't we use subject—verb contruction to express this kind of meaning? Well, because we don't. That's how Russian works.

      After all, the ideas about dinner are not something we do, it's a discussion of possibilities that exist. Possibilities that exist are not our actions, so it makes perfect sense to use a different construction to discuss dinner ideas (subjectless sentence) and actual action of cooking dinner (with a subject and a verb). I could ask you why you use modal verbs in English instead of the normal subjectless sentences.

      like 'что мы приготовим на обед'

      «Что мы приготовим на обед» means "What will we cook for lunch?". It refers to the action with some certaincy, it's not a discussion of ideas, it's a more specific question.

      And doesn't 'надо' mean need

      This sentence is not 100% identical to «Что нам надо приготовить на обед» (although it is definitely similar), so don't take «надо» too literal. It's just a way to explain the grammar.

      Obviously, «Что нам надо приготовить на обед» is equally grammatical in Russian, and if you wanted to express the 'neccessity', you'd use «надо».


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h2odog123

      Although this is confusing to me also, I like your answer. When I pose this type of question to my wife, a native Russia speaker, her answer is, "Don't try to make it make sense. It will drive you crazy. Just do it. Eventually it will become natural."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frazer_124

      Okay, thank you. Like you said, I guess this is one of those idioms which is hard to translate exactly. But thank you for explaining so thoroughly.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon_JDS

      Put simply, the literal translation is 'what to cook for lunch for us'? The verb is in the infinitive and ham is not the subject (not sure whether it is accusative or something else)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadalingo

      Большое спасибо! Thank you very much for being so detailed with your explanations. I know writing this down must have taken a lot of time. But I can assure you this helps me and others so much to grasp the internal structure of a foreign language. Пока


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-max_-

      This is super


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaias627898

      Thank you for explaining!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcusimpetus

      Disclaimer: I don't know Russian, and I don't even know if this answer is right, but I'm going to be applying my knowledge of other languages to help answer your question:

      The sentence does have a subject; the infinitive form of a verb can function as a subject, in this case приготовить. We do this in English:

      "To be at war is the best way of preserving peace." The verb "be" in its infinitive form is the subject of the sentence.

      If you had the sentence "Что приготовить на обед?", this would mean: "What to cook for lunch?" To cook, приготовить, is the subject. (I believe this is a sentence fragment, not sure though).

      нам is the dative for "us," and the dative case is used to express the beneficiary of an action. So "Что нам приготовить на обед?" translates a bit more literally as: "What to cook for lunch, for our benefit?"

      Hope this helps!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucianoTra2

      This makes a lot of sense.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

      I would first think of it as "What is there for us to cook" and then, in less bookish English, as "What should we cook."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

      so how would you say in russina "what are we cooking for lunch"? что мы готовить на обед??


      [deactivated user]

        No, «гото́вить» is an inifinitive (to cook). You should use a personal verb form, a 1 person plural is «гото́вим»:

        «Что́ мы гото́вим на обе́д?» 'What are we cooking for lunch?'


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

        Yes sorry, I forgot to conjugate it, but that's what was on my head. By the way, thank you veyr much szeraja_zhaba, you have helped a lot with my questions!!


        [deactivated user]

          You're welcome! :)


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/75savard

          It is subjectless. Can it mean 'what should I cook for lunch' instead of we?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

          That would be "Что мне приготовить на обед?".


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarsUnseen

          So it's more like a thought about an action.. "What, for me, to cook for lunch?"


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/75savard

          thank you, i confused it


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

          I reported it. Regardless of the Russian grammar, English often uses the present tense to indicate an immediate future. [So "what are we cooking for lunch" is the most common way of saying "what will we be cooking for lunch".]


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ward.Joshua

          I agree. Pragmatically, What shall we make for lunch?, What will we make for lunch?, and What are we making for lunch? carry the same effective meaning here, and are equivalent as far as this exercise should be concerned.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/youtookmyname

          I disagree. I think there's a difference between "should" and "will." "Should" refers to possibilities, like "could." If I ask "what should we make for lunch?" I'm assuming there is no plan yet and I'm looking for ideas. However, if I say "what will we make..." I imagine someone else already has a plan and I need to catch up to it. It seems to me this exercise is about the question before the plan is made.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goldbedr

          I'm going to as well. It may not be the exact translation, but it carries the identical meaning.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valerie368245

          Why can't we say "what are we going to make for lunch"? I understand this may not be an appropriate literal translation of "приготовить", but 999/1000 times in English we say "make" food and everyone knows it implies cooking/preparing.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c.a.sid

          is there no word for "should" in russian?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrzegorzW1987

          There is the word должен/должна/должно (for example: ты должен купить билет = you should buy a ticket), but in questions like this, using dative case is more common, for example: как мне жить? = how should I live, мне остаться или идти? = should I stay or should I go.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mons827895

          "What are we preparing for lunch?" is marked as wrong and dispite reading the thread i can't say i see why. Would it be ok to say "What are we to prepare for lunch?"? As this can in no situation be seen us doing anything at the moment - if that indeed is what is the problem with the former.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elsantodel90

          I tried "What has been prepared for us for lunch?" which was rejected and has a very different meaning. I am interested in the reasoning though.

          Since "нам" is in the dative, it carries a "for us" , "to us" sense. If it were "нам надо", then it would be "necessary for us" and it would be clear. But there is no надо in the sentence, so "нам" has to be acting on "приготовить" (this is probably where the mistake in my reasoning lies. But how can I tell that "нам" is related to an implicit "надо" or similar particle and not to "приготовить"?).

          So, this must be asking what is cooked/prepared for us ("нам") for lunch.

          So my new question is: How would this idea be expressed?

          "Что приготовить нам на обед" ? (Word order)

          Or maybe without the infinitive, similar to the idiomatic "Как вас зовут?"

          "Что приготовят нам на обед"


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dotters

          Is it just my undertrained ear or is the soft consonant at the end of приготовить impossible to make out at normal speed?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bettyru2

          Can the translation also be: What could we cook for lunch?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trikkilee

          Just out of curiosity...

          Would this sentence be correct without the "нам"?

          "Что приготовить на обед?"

          Is this sentence possible?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

          It would be correct grammatically, but it would be unclear whether it's supposed to be "we should" or "I should". In fact, unless the context makes it obvious, the default assumption would be "what should I cook for lunch?", as if you were volunteering to cook the lunch by yourself and were asking the other guys what they want.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sofa4ka

          Готовить means also to 'prepare', but Duolingo didn't accept it. :-/


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kocmohabt99

          How would you say "What should I cook for lunch"? Like "Что мне приготовить на обед?"


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadin-317

          Should переводится как СтОит ИЛИ СЛЕДУЕТ. Что мне следует приготовить на обед?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filip112535

          Приготовить means prepare not cook.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FairOaks

          Preparation, in English, is a subset of cooking that does not include heat. Russian doesn't seem to have that limitation. While приготовить does mean "to prepare," it is unnecessarily limiting in English to directly translate it as such when talking about food.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allanmherrera

          Why "приготовить" and not "готовит"?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FairOaks

          Приготовить as the perfective indicates a single action. This question assumes that the next lunch, or today's lunch, is the one being prepared. Готовить would convey a meaning of all lunches generally.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry132109

          If I wish to say "What has been prepared for us for lunch?", should I say что приготовил (нам/для нас) на обед? as the preparation is completed?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CPTpreston

          I put what do we cook for lunch its the same as what SHOULD we cook for lunch


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew-215401

          Except it's really not. Maybe this is just another strange thing about English (there are so many), but "What should we cook for lunch?" is a discussion about the plans for the near future and about making a decision regarding a forthcoming lunch. Technically, this could be about a specific lunch scheduled to happen on a day in the future (planning an event, for instance). But it's definitely a future-looking discussion about a date- and time-specific meal. "What DO we cook for lunch" is a general query about a recurring habit, and has absolutely zero to do with what the next lunch is going consist of, other than a potential presumption or inference one might make simply because the recurring habitual lunch happens literally every day.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithBrown932

          Yet another inconsistency! Why does DL give a definition of " приготовить" as "to prepare" and then not accept it as an answer. Infuriating....


          [deactivated user]

            Because words across languages don’t have exact correspondences.

            In the context of food, пригото́вить means ‘to cook’. In other contexts, it means ‘to prepare’.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geneven

            I said, "what are we preparing for lunch" which was rejected. I didn't like "what are we cooking for lunch" because it seemed to me that we might be not be cooking anything for lunch. For example, sandwiches wouldn't be cooked, or would salad.


            [deactivated user]

              In Russian, we say «де́лать бутербро́ды» ‘to make [open] sandwiches’. So, I guess, ‘prepare’ is closer to «де́лать» here.

              However, we still use «гото́вить» for salads. Maybe it’s because salads in Russian cuisine are indeed cooked (e.g. Olivier salad includes boiled potatoes and carrots).


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h2odog123

              Yes, I agree. That's the answer I'm seeking here also. Why isn't "to prepare" concidered correct?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

              "Fix" is also not accepted by Duolingo when referring to food, even though that is the verb that comes to my mind when referring to meals and things like salad and soup; for lasagna, I'd use "make."


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathy427595

              How come it can't be: What are we making for lunch?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LallaColli

              Please could someone tell me why is it на обед and not на обеде? I'm quite confused ^^


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dotters

              This slightly rarer way to use the preposition на to indicate the purpose or the value of a thing calls for accusative, it's the same на you'll find in:

              • Вот ответ на твой вопрос. -> Here is the answer to your question.
              • На что вы надеялись? -> What were you hoping for?
              • Что можно купить на сто рублей? -> What can one buy with 100 roubles?

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandroenoc99

              Why is "What are we cooking for lunch? " wrong?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solomon502280

              "What are we having for lunch?" Is wrong?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/43Ze3

              Once again, my question is what it has been before: why are idiomatic exceptions being introduced to what is the equivalent of first semester students in Russian? In most cases those who write competent lesson material, withold the majority of exceptions whenever possible, until the basic rules have been established and beginners are thoroughly familiar with the basics. It's only then that, that exceptions are introduced.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dotters

              But this is not an exception. These sentences built around the dative case are ubiquitous in Russian and can be a huge obstacle to comprehension early on. It's very useful to get used to their structure as early as possible.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siarczan6miedzi2

              and why not "for THE lunch"?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanFedasiuk

              Adding "the" before "lunch" sounds unnatural in English. I ask "What are you making for lunch?" and not "What are you making for the lunch?" The same is true for breakfast and dinner.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FairOaks

              A little more concretely, the word lunch is a very abstract noun that can mean anything from a class of foods to the midday time period with or without a meal. "The" specifies a particular instance but doesn't really work with lunch because lunch is too conceptual, as RyanFedasiuk said. The word "luncheon" has the meaning of a specific event and can take articles.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenpeckhover

              What is the definition of Perfective and Imperfective? When do we use each one?


              [deactivated user]

                All the Russian verbs are divided into 2 categories: perfective and imperfective.

                Imperfective verbs describe to an action as a process taking some period of time. An action has a start time and an end time. For example, гото́вить 'to be cooking' is an imperfective verb.

                Perfective verbs describe an action as one-off event that happens momentarily. It has only one point of the time. For example, пригото́вить 'to have cooked' is a perfective verb. An action of that verb happens when you successfully finished cooking and got the results. If you haven't finished cooking, you can't use пригото́вить. The action happens only at the moment you finish cooking.

                You might note that both гото́вить and пригото́вить are translated with the verb 'to cook' into English. English has more tenses so it needs less verbs, Russian has more verbs so it needs less tenses.

                The same action can often be described with both a perfective and an imperfective verb. If so, perfective emphasises a result, and imperfective emphasises a process. So, «Что нам гото́вить на обе́д?» is possible, but it sounds as if you're not interested in getting some food, you're asking how you're to spend your time. Maybe a kid could ask this, when he's just doing the chores and not really motivated to get the food cooked.

                Note that only imperfective verbs have a present-tense form. A present tense suggests an action is in progress now, but perfective verbs can't be in progress.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd214771

                From the audio, this sounds more like, Что нам приготовит на обед? "What is he going to cook for us for lunch." Without context, and with poor audio, it's very difficult to be able to hear the ить vs ит, which entirely changes the meaning of the sentence.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaung944

                "What do we cook for lunch?" was marked as wrong, is there anything to indicate between the implied "should we" or "do we", or is this just Duo not having all the possible translations?


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bettyru2

                If you only hear it, it could also be: Что нам приготовит на обед? - What is he cooking us for lunch? I don't hear the ь there.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elyakiwi

                I translated, 'What are we going to cook for lunch' which was wrong. I don't know if this is a Kiwi idiom but to me the two translations mean the same thing. Though we would more commonly say "What are we going to have for lunch?" In both sentences there would be no emphasis on 'are going to'. They are fillers. The point of the sentence is 'what?' and 'we' and 'for lunch'. I'm sorry, I don't know all the grammatical terms for what I am trying to say. Does anyone get what I am trying to point out and do you concur that 'What are we going to cook for lunch?' should be marked as correct? I'm asking not out of a need to be right but a desire to understand! :D


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulSarran

                Do I understand the event as future, that is, it is not happening now and has not already happened. If so why is only "should" accepted, and not will or shall. I put it in your way, though I think you are wrong, for the sake of proceeding.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le-petit-loup

                For those having trouble figuring this out, infinitive sentences like this exist in English too. Think of yourself rifling through the fridge: "Hmmm, what to cook ourselves (dative force) for lunch?"


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve448292

                note to self about perf vs imperf from a comment in here

                All the Russian verbs are divided into 2 categories: perfective and imperfective.

                Imperfective verbs describe to an action as a process taking some period of time. An action has a start time and an end time. For example, гото́вить 'to be cooking' is an imperfective verb.

                Perfective verbs describe an action as one-off event that happens momentarily. It has only one point of the time. For example, пригото́вить 'to have cooked' is a perfective verb. An action of that verb happens when you successfully finished cooking and got the results. If you haven't finished cooking, you can't use пригото́вить. The action happens only at the moment you finish cooking.

                You might note that both гото́вить and пригото́вить are translated with the verb 'to cook' into English. English has more tenses so it needs less verbs, Russian has more verbs so it needs less tenses.

                The same action can often be described with both a perfective and an imperfective verb. If so, perfective emphasises a result, and imperfective emphasises a process. So, «Что нам гото́вить на обе́д?» is possible, but it sounds as if you're not interested in getting some food, you're asking how you're to spend your time. Maybe a kid could ask this, when he's just doing the chores and not really motivated to get the food cooked.

                Note that only imperfective verbs have a present-tense form. A present tense suggests an action is in progress now, but perfective verbs can't be in progress.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swturley

                where is 'should' here?


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/metaph

                As regards the "Что нам" (Interrogative pronoun + dative), that sounds like forming an incomplete sentence, I would note that Biblical Greek (or koine) has an absolutely identical idiomatic structure, that some say is a Hebraism. I can't say whether or not that is in usage in modern demotic Greek.

                However it may be, the fact is that usually translate as "What does somebody have to do with something or somebody", and is translated in Russian as "что мне, что тебе, что ему, что нам, что вам, что им", that is, что + dative.

                The full structure of this idiom is slightly more complex, as it usually indicates reciprocity, so "что мне и тебе", literally, "what to me and to you", but in fact meaning "what has [this] to do with me and you" or "what do I have to do with you" or "what do you have to do with me" (these structures are all taken from actual English translations).

                The dative in this case is probably an ethical dative, indicating some relation, say, of "invested personal interest or concern", like when a mom says to her children "don't break me your toys" (they are too much expensive and I have bought them with my money, so they are much my concern as they are yours). The example is far from perfect, but ethical dative is definitely something to look up and that might clarify this kind of sentence.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

                It's actually much simpler. "Что нам" is not an expression and those two words don't affect each other despite being placed close withing the sentence. The reason "нам" is in the dative, is because in the "что нам приготовить?" there is an omitted word. That word is "надо" (or "нужно") . The full version would be "что нам надо приготовить?", and "надо" requires the dative. "Что" on the other hand is in the accusative case (which for the inanimate pronoun happened to have the same form as the nominative) because it's the direct object of the verb "приготовить".


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chiril28

                In Romanian, the translation is very close, kinda mot-a-mot: Ce (что) să ne pregătim (приготовить) nouă (нам) la cină (на обед) :)


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bolokelen

                For me, the most accurately idiomatic translations in english would be either what should we make for lunch or what are we making for lunch (rejected). We almost never say cook unless we're specifically referencing the act of cooking itself - for example, maybe you're being paid to cook. Otherwise, we mostly just say we're making this or that for whatever meal. I'm going to report this one too.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

                No one cooks lunch. Sandwiches salads. I would be happy with what should we make for lunch.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenpeckhover

                Would someone please explain why "What are we going to prepare for lunch?" was marked wrong? Does the Perfective (a.k.a. Infinitive?) always require "should"?


                [deactivated user]

                  Infinitive could imply a range of things from possibility ('could', 'can'; где́ купи́ть гвозде́й? where [can I] buy some nails?) to suggestions ('should') and perhaps neccessity (мне́ за́втра ра́но встава́ть 'I need to get up early tomorrow'), but it's not a simple statement about the future, so translating it with 'going to' is not really correct. Although sometimes the difference is indeed pretty subtle.


                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MychellJoh2

                  Why is not possible to accept "what do we cook for lunch"?


                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadHatter601

                  Do на and для mean the same?


                  [deactivated user]

                    No. In most cases, those are not interchangeable.

                    «На» is often translated ‘on’ (на столе ‘on the table’).

                    «Для» is closer to the English ‘for‘, but it’s not used with the meals.

                    The pronouns are tricky because each language uses them slightly differently. You’ll just have to remember that meals are used with «на» and not «для».


                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimmen17

                    This sentence means "What to prepare for us for lunch? ", there is no "should" (должен) here, there is no indication that "we are going to prepare", but "someone prepare for us". This is not the first time when duolingo teaches you one thing, then expects another, taken straight from google translate.


                    [deactivated user]

                      This sentence means "What to prepare for us for lunch? "

                      No, it doesn’t.

                      «X in dative + verb Y in infinitive?» is a way to ask ‘Should X do Y?’, most commonly X is «мне» or «нам». E.g.:

                      • Мне уйти́? — Should I leave?
                      • Что ему́ де́лать? — What should he do?
                      • Не говори́ мне, что мне де́лать, и я не скажу́ тебе́, куда́ тебе́ пойти́. ‘Don’t tell me what I should do, and I won’t tell you where you should go.’

                      This course was created by native speakers and it’s generally quite reliable when it comes to translation accuracy.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsmAvatar

                      Very helpful. I was so confused on where the 'should' was coming from since the sentence wasn't future tense.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaborBihary

                      I see that нам implies something here but I thaught it was можно rather than надо. Therefore I translated it as "What can we make for lunch?" This has similar meaning as "What do we have to cook for lunch?"

                      Could anybody explain me if it is wrong and why if so?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nateacebal

                      "what do we cook for lunch" and "what should we cook for lunch" is literally the same answer


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t.ramsey

                      That should mean "What will we cook for lunch?"


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scottled1

                      My sentence "What do we make for lunch?" Is marked wrong. But ""What should we cook for lunch?" Is somehow correct, even though THEY BOTH mean the same, EXACT thing in English. Okay, whatever, no explanation, no reason. Getting really tired of DL dual standards


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/munenor

                      OK, now I correct in second time. But I answerd "What do we cook for lunch? " first time. I'm really confused by translation "should". How this "should" is inside of this sentence??

                      Maybe just because "Что нам" makes "what should we" ??

                      Thank you


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElnSxV
                      • 1880

                      What are we having for lunch? Why not?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexHeaume

                      Could this sentence be interpreted as: "what should I cook for lunch(for us)"?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jakob721042

                      Why is для wrong?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zedpsurfer

                      Are the recordings deliberately swift speech or am I slow of hearing?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k3EzAMT7

                      This sentence seems to imply that some unexpressed subject is going to cook lunch for us. So why would it be incorrect to translate it as: " What are you cooking for us at lunch?" since we have no context to go by.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sofa4ka

                      The sentence asks what should WE make for lunch, not what someone else will cook for us. Что нам приготовить = what should we cook/make/prepare...

                      Maybe you have confused this with (он) нам приготовит = (he) will cook for us. Notice the letter ь is missing here, which changes the meaning.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisterChis1

                      Could someone explain to me the difference between готовить and приготовить?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardoGCxD

                      What's the difference between приготовить and готовить exactly?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

                      "Приготовить" is a perfective verb, "готовить" is an imperfective verb. Perfective verb focus on completed actions and on the result. Imperfective verbs focus on the process or express a repeated action.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyronGasio

                      In the U.S. we usually prepare food for lunch. "What are we preparing for lunch?" was not accepted. And why "should"?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChardyHar

                      Would "Что мы должны приготовить на обед?" also be a correct translation?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChardyHar

                      Would "Что мы должны приготовить на обед?" also be a potentially correct translation?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxygal32

                      "what do we cook for lunch" why is that wrong?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

                      I think there would be less guessing and panic if we were taught first the meaning of this difficult sentence, instead of asking us to guess at what is not able to be guessed. What a waste of time!!


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PianoLvr

                      So what exactly does 'нам' mean?


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsmAvatar

                      Dative first-person plural pronoun. Like "for us". The full sentence might super-literally be translated as "What for us to cook for lunch?" It is a somewhat idiomatic way of saying 'what should we cook' as mentioned a few times above.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PianoLvr

                      That helped a lot! Спасибо! :)


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoHU10

                      what do we need to cook for lunch


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsmAvatar

                      Need is надо.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hansgrrkloss

                      I still think it should be possible to translate обед into dinner (as well as lunch). Where I come from lunch was called 'second breakfast'. We never ate 'obiad' (it is Polish) around noon. It is one of the reasons why automatic translators do not get how complex and fluffy our languages are.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franz__Liszt

                      Why НАМ and not МЫ


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjumPerve2

                      Why "should" is incorporated in translation whereas there is no such word for. Why "what do we cook.." is incorrect for the given text.


                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

                      Literally What for us to cook. Obviously not how we speak. What to cook? We say what SHOULD we cook. Sometimes we say What to do? More often What SHOULD WE do?. When Russian doesn't use the words we use we need to use the words with the same meaning for English translation

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