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"моя кровать"

Translation:my bed

November 13, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I always heard "постель" for bed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanisaChatte

"Постель" works too. Added it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilyofdeath

If that is pronounced the way I think ("pastyél") it will forever remind me of the word I use in Spanish for cake ("pastel"). Cake-bed... bed-cake... idk. Funny word x)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Thanks. What is used more? Are there regional preferences? My husband was born in Moscow, and later the family moved to Latvia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pafkorn

Кровать - is a piece of furniture.

There are two beds in the room. - В комнате две кровати. You can't say: "В комнате две постели"

Постель - bedclothes: a sheet, blankets, pillows. It originates from a verb "стелить" - "to lay, to spread".

So, one can't call a bed without bedclothes "постель". The usage of "Постель" is always somehow related to sleeping or sex.

Он лежит в постели (He is lying in bed) - It is assumed that he is sleeping, going to sleep soon or has just woke up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juri447245

Maybe it is a word used in Moscow more often. My relatives in Saint Petersburg don't use that word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

Hah, I have only ever heard the "кровать " version. I learned a new word because of you . Thanks ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroVulpes

This reminds me of the Greek "κρεβάτι" ("kreváti").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scarcerer

I thought of the French "cravate" (a tie) which wasn't exactly helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

Very good observation, and you're actually not that far from the truth, and I'll tell you why :-) .

French word for "cravate" is called that way because ties were invented in Croatia, and the name of their country in Serbo-Croatians is "Hrvatska" , (from Krv in the Old Slavic), which basically means blood :-) , Like, people "related by blood" or something.

See how Etymology can lead you anywhere and everywhere? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nunes89

I am studying Russian на кровате. Is it right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bkofman

Almost! на кровати


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owenvenes

this should be the last sentence you'll need at the end of a successful night out ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GC1998

So "on my bed" would translate as "на моей кровати"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phen0mejon

Why is it moya and not moy? I thought moya was only for feminine words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KsanterX

Кровать is a feminine word. They usually end with 'а', 'я', 'ь'.

And yes, as Darkwisp said, there are some exceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darkwisp

I may be wrong but in some bases if it ends with ь it could masculine or feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chel-lala

So this Ь is female... Is there a rule or a link to study? How do I know when words ending in ь is male or female?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

I never thought of it but it really seems there every day maculine words ending with ь , which you just have to memorize:

http://masterrussian.com/nounsandcases/gender_and_number.htm

EDIT: Only ones I am sure which are always feminine are --сть : ярость старость кость мудрость

EDIT 2: I've found here http://masterrussian.com/htgender.shtml
that nouns ending with -teль tend to be masculine as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bkofman

Гость (guest) is masculine, постель (bed) is fem. So the only rule is that there's no rule. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkCurtis9

I think those rules only apply when the ending "-тель" or "-ость" is a suffix - for example, the word "учитель" (teacher) is formed by taking the word "учить" (to teach) and adding the suffix "-тель" (-er), and is masculine as per dempl's rule above. In Bkofman's examples, the endings aren't suffixes (they're just integral parts of the words) so the rules don't apply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bkofman

That sounds right, Mark! At least, I can't think of any exceptions to that rule. And when I think of arbitrarily adding "-тель" to a word, to me that word would be masc. The fem. version would end with "-тельница", e.g., учительница.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkCurtis9

I've just come across this discussion: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/12477769 where Shady_arc mentions these rules, and gives a couple of others, too. Worth a read.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

Damn' you've got me haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/douknoukem

I'm hearing cravat

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