"Можномнесобаку?"

Translation:Can I have a dog?

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Okay, this one made me laugh in amongst all the можно мне суп, можно мне курицу... Double take time when I saw можно мне собаку. (Of course, it's possible I'm just going slightly mad from Duolingo overdose, but I thought it was amusing...)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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The thing is that the Russian sentence does not specify what the asker is going to do with the dog. The sentece can also mean, "May I buy a/the dog?", "Can I hold the dog for a while?" or "May I use the dog?". You can't really tell without a context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peachtree2

Wish this wasn't open-ended translation format. I put "Can I get a dog?" but a bunch of things would be normal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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I don't work for DL, but my experience with them tells me that they usually pick one or two likely equivalents and leave it to participants of discussions to fill in the 'gaps' (i.e. to suggest other valid translations). DL's primary translations often leave to be desired.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/illirina
illirina
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can I get..? what's wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GT_Shark

Seeing the text "Can I've a dog" Is simply wrong... I don't mean technically... Probably perfectly reasonable sentence. But, In speech there is a definite H in there eluding to "Can I-h-v a dog" Which would be written "Can I have a dog". I'm 45 years old and have never seen in written form "Can I've ...." Again. I'm sure its technically correct. But, I've never seen it, except in sentences like "I've never seen it" Anyone else think it looks odd? Probably just me :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenCavines
KenCavines
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"Can I've" sounds completely wrong to this native speaker (USA variety). But I can't think of an example where "have", when indicating possession, is ever contracted to 've. Maybe the contraction only occurs when used as a helping verb, such as "I have seen" -> "I've seen".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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The only time I can think of an exception when have is indicating possession is when it's acting as a helper verb to got! So yes, I agree.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirckk
dirckk
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British English actually does allow the non-auxiliary "have" to contract:

"I've a question."

(though even for the Brits you can't contract it when you have an inverted modal like "can"... I think the reason is that this is not the finite present "have" [which would be "has" if the subject were 3rd person], it's the bare-infinitive "have" because of the modal)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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"Can I've" is bonkers in American English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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In standard English, contracted forms of verbs are never used in questions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenCavines
KenCavines
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This statement is to general, although it may be true as a trend, or specifically related to to the abbreviation 've for have. But I can think of many contacted verb forms in questions. Can't you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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In "can't" the particle "not" is contracted, not the verb itself.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnetcParticls

Contractions are perfectly legal. Just because it's not popular doesn't mean it's wrong. Styles are defined by doing things differently. Unpopular contracted words are my bag, don't knock it.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/___Jake___

for here or to go?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveBKK

I listened to this recording 12 times and still could not grasp it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Можно мне is often used in the sense "May I speak with" or "May I use".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Squonkalini
Squonkalini
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What case is собаку in?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Accusative (among other things, it is used for direct objects)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Squonkalini
Squonkalini
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Much obliged!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HugoBastos93
HugoBastos93
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Why is it собаку and not собака? I was under the impression that in such constructions "мне... ", what is translated as the object is, in fact, the subject; as in, the literal translation would be "is a dog possible to me? " or something like that xD thanks for any help :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alimgo
alimgo
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It is basically an impersonal construction. You could add an 'it' to make it sort of seem a little more logical: It is allowed to me a dog.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardMarr1

Should "Can I get a dog?" be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexmalaho
Alexmalaho
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I guess that's a yes. Можно мне собаку and можно мне завести собаку often have the same meaning.

8 months ago
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