"He walks slowly."

Translation:Él camina lentamente.

4 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lindaginenthal

What is the difference between lentamente and despacio?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kylee.grof

They mean the same thing. They are just different ways to say slow

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalo.stoyanov

So no difference at all?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BezJones
BezJones
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Well lento means slow and lentamente means slower. Despacio I think can mean both. I'm not sure myself just wanted to point out that lentamente (as with any word ending in "ente") means slowly, not slow. Lentamente = slowly, fácilment = easily, prevamente = previously. So the spanish "ente" on the ends of words is like the English "ly" on the ends of words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silvan14

What am I missing here? Isn't male walking camino? I get it wrong with camino....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kylee.grof

Verbs aren't gender specific. Instead, the ending of a verb is used to specify the pronoun. So the verb to walk (caminar) would have its "ar" ending taken off and replaced with the appropriate pronoun ending. For verbs ending in "ar" these endings are usually: I- "o" , you-"as", he/she/it-"a", They or a formal you-"an", and We- "amos".....So for he walks it would be camina.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silvan14

Yes I keep forgetting the verb caminar. That makes more sense. Gracias!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MienxzyAttack

thanks that was very helpful

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chrisdodso7

But adjetives are gender specific, correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Most are, yes. Mainly those that end with -o/-a.

  • gender-specific: nouns, adjectives, pronouns, articles
  • not gender-specific: verbs, adverbs
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IlonaShanley

Can the verb 'andar' be used here??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evabarke

Yes, it was accepted for me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayoung101
ayoung101
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stupid question: is there a difference between "despacio" (as it is used here) and "despacito" (like the song)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Really good question.

In general, the -ito (or -ita) ending in Spanish forms a diminutive. But what that means is open to some interpretation depending on the word. It can mean something is young (as in "señorita") or small (like "mosquito", literally a "little fly"). It can be used to just make something sound cute ("perrito," a doggy). It can also just be used to sound undemanding, and strike a friendly or pleading tone.

Or (and I think this is the case here) it can strengthen a word that already indicates something's smallness. E.g. "ahora" - "now", "ahorita" - "right now!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Not a stupid question. :)
According to my research, despacio simply means "slowly" or "quietly", and despacito, which I think is a diminutive form, is closer to "very slowly, quietly, calmly, sneakily".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wilson.an82
wilson.an82
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Why do the adverbs sometimes go after the verb and sometimes before? Where's that rule? ¿Dónde está ésa regla?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

There is no such rule. Adjectives typically follow the nouns they modify, but will often precede for special effect (sometimes to alter the meaning of the adjective or how it's applied). Adverbs, however, are much more free to appear elsewhere in a sentence. As with English, it's generally a good idea to keep adverbs near the thing they modify. If it's a simple verb, the adverb usually appears just before or after the verb. Sometimes adverbs modify entire phrases and their placement is set accordingly.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beerandissues

What does ande mean, never taught it, or don't remember

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

taylor- ande is from the verb andar, subjonctive present, first and third person sing. yo ande, él ande

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ccaangeboden

Él pasea lentamente. Why can't I use the verb 'pasear'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

ccaange- pasear is more like for taking a walk, andar is really to walk in the majority of situations

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

Is there a rule for when there's an 'a' and when there's an 'e' in making an adjective into an adverb (recientEmente, lentAmente)? Or do I just have to memorize it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It's generally just the same as the feminine form of the root adjective, plus -mente. (Note that "reciente" doesn't change with gender, which is why it becomes "recientemente.")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salonikia3

Why "el camina poco a poco" is wrong? The says that slowly is translated poco a poco

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elijah_kf

he walks slowly, in fear of landmines

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobH6

I used 'despacio' instead of lentamente. Él camina despacio.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cara489028

Yeah they mean the same thing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarelTomas1

I wrote: "Él marcha..." - Why is it a mistake??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cara489028

Because that means he marches slowly not walk slowly

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Not exactly. The English "march" and the Spanish "marchar" share a root, but they don't mean quite the same thing. They can both refer to the style of military parading or rhythmic walking.

Nevertheless, it is true that all of the meanings of "marchar" are more specific than "walk" and "caminar."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ImpossibleGamng

☺☺☺☺☺

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlamingSha1

Isn't 'ello' another translation for 'he'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

No, "ello" is a gender-neutral pronoun, which (since Spanish has no neuter nouns) is rarely needed. It's typically only used when referring to things that are so abstract that they can't clearly be attached to a noun. Even then, the Spanish style of omitting subject pronouns means it doesn't tend to come up.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jared605537

Why can't I use a form of "pasear" for "walk"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Pasear" is more like going for a walk than the act of walking itself, which wouldn't typically be what we mean in English by "he walks." It's not entirely unambiguous, though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/helendonaghy1

why anda instead of camina i dont understand

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Both words should be fine.

1 year ago
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