https://www.duolingo.com/Plamsy

Danish, Swedish, Norwegian

Plamsy
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I just realized that there is no english course for these languages, although we have all of them. Why don't they make these courses?

2 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I can only speak for Swedish, most Swedes grow up bilingual in both English and Swedish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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I wouldn't call it being bilingual, even though they do learn it at school and from media, and are generally quite proficient at it.

Also, not everyone you encounter in real life will know English, although pretty much everyone who gets interviewed in media and so forth can speak it well. Older people, less well educated people, and people in the countryside often aren't as well represented in media etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liebert_
Liebert_
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Interesting!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oxq
oxq
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Most (almost all) Scandinavians know English very well and are taught English through the school system.

Check out http://www.thepolyglotdream.com/scandinavianenglish/ for more of an explanation on this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I've always put it down to their practice of subtitling, rather than dubbing, foreign films -- so they learn a lot of English just through consuming US media, an advantage the Germans (for example) don't have, since they dub everything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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This is true. We obviously dub child shows and such, even the first three Harry Potter movies. Very awkward to watch in fact. I don't understand why the Germans do it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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It's all about what one is used to. I know many Germans who don't like having the subtitles in the way of the picture, when they watch something that is subtitled.

In general, bigger languages tend to dub (since it's a lot more work intensive and expensive that "just" sticking on some subtitles), and smaller languages tend to subtitle. And I agree that those who watch more subtitled stuff tend to have better accents in English than those who watch more dubbed stuff, even when comparing similar languages (for example Portuguese people vs. Spanish people).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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Yes, I was speaking from my POV.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/widle
widle
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Czechs must be an exception to this general rule, though - there's a big tradition of dubbing here. And they are doing it the proper way, with casting the voices to be at least somewhat similar, etc. (in contrast to what we call "Polish dubbing", which is just one person reading all the lines in a flat voice). When done well, it sounds good, and unfortunately doesn't motivate people to learn languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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Re overacting when dubbing: I always found the same with German dubbing. The women are all very breathy and the men just silly.

My Russian friend apparently learned the bulk of her (very good) English by turning up the sound of programs which were dubbed "the Polish way" and listening to the original English which you can hear in the background. Great for her, but probably not very popular among her neighbors...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgstcd
jgstcd
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I never liked Czech dubbing. The actors who do it all seem to fall into the trap of reading the lines as they would for a radio drama, which is understandable, but leads to chronic overacting. I find it physically painful to listen to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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My Russian friend apparently learned the bulk of her (very good) English by turning up the sound of programs which were dubbed "the Polish way" and listening to the original English which you can hear in the background.

Yes, I think of that kind of male-monotone-over-original dubbing as "the Russian way." However, it is terrible for an English speaker trying to learn Russian, because the English words crowd out the Russian.

Just recently I viewed a film dubbed "the German way" in Russian, and it was GREAT from the point of view of language learning, especially if a subtitle file is hunted up for when it's needed. How nice to have children sound like children, and females sound like females! There's a Georgian site mentioned by Tamuna10, here, where samples can be viewed. It's a pity that where I live movies with Russian dubbing are almost impossible to buy, and Russian will not directly export such DVDs (or audio CDs) anymore.

. . . and listening to the original English which you can hear in the background. Great for her, but probably not very popular among her neighbors...

Suggest earphones. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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here in Finland everyone I know can speak at least some English, I assume it's the same in Sweden and Norway (since their languages are even more similar to English)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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In Norway, when we're done with basic school we have had English as a class for about about ten+ years, in addition to exposure by American/English movies and Internet roaming.

While it would be nice if we got a reverse course, we don't really need it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anitramwaju
anitramwaju
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I remember reading somewhere that the Danes are considered to be the best English speakers as a second language in the world… (not necessarily really true but probably not far from reality) so Duolingo would probably not be very useful for them (and I'm pretty sure it's about the same for Swedes and Norwegians).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandomTed
RandomTed
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I know I would like one. I want to learn Danish, but I wish it had a Danish to English tree since I like doing the reserve tree at the same time I do the forward one.

2 years ago
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