"Я Вера, а тебя как зовут?"

Translation:I'm Vera, and what's your name?

November 16, 2015

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/xmatnazarov

Hello, John. I'll try to answer your question. Actually, the opposite (without the а) can seem condescending in Russian. I'm from Uzbekistan and in uzbek too, it's like a necessity to use it to mean that "I told you my name, now it's your turn to tell yours". For example, -Ты был в Париже? (Have you been to Paris?) -Нет, а ты? (No, and you?) To tell the truth, I find it a little difficult to explain. I'd love native speakers to help out.

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/John495488

very helpful - thanks a million! Here's a lingot for your trouble :)

January 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

This is just a feeling based simply on the fact of the different treatment of "and" = "a" in the two languages - that without the "a", the Russian sounds more commanding, as if the speaker were demanding to know the person's name, and thus setting himself/herself in a high social status, which gives the authority to demand names (like a policeman or a government agent or a prince/princess or King/Queen. Just a hunch (notion), though.

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/John495488

In English "AND what is your name" can seem a little condescending. Is there no such implication in Russian?

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TranquilGiraffe

Is the "and" very necessary in the sentence "I'm Vera, and what's your name?"

March 14, 2019
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