"No, I want juice."

Translation:Нет, я хочу сока.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Munir-Bahul
Munir-Bahul
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I typed "нет, хочу сок", why is it wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Memoryy721

Not typing the "я" is acceptable in russian, but NOT for this lesson. You seem to be more advanced than the student this lesson is meant for)) Good luck with everything, friend!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustBill78
JustBill78
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Ok on this screen I see сок but on the lesson I see сока...So which is it? And the rest of the sentence is the same.

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Russian nouns (words naming things, phenomena and living beings) have several forms called cases.

    Noun case determines how the word behaves in a certain situation. For example, the 'doer' of the action is usually in the nominative case (linguistically speaking, the subject is in the nominative case). Here, «я» 'I' is the nominative case. 'I' do the action of 'wanting'.

    When quoting the noun in dictionaries or elsewhere, you use the nominative case. Сок is the nominative case, so that's what you'd see in dictionaries (and probably in hints on this site; although the hints are auto-generated and unreliable).

    The thing affected by the action is called 'object'. Actions may have several objects, but the most important one is called 'direct object'. Russian marks direct objects with one of two cases: accusative or genitive. The accusative of «сок» is also «сок» (it's same as nominative), and the genitive is «сока».

    The exact distinction is a bit blurry, but accusative is usually used for things as a whole, and genitive is used for partial things. For example, you're more likely to use «Я выпил сок» 'I've drunk [the] juice' if you've finished the juice, and if you only had a glass of juice and there's something left, you're more likely to use «Я выпил сока» 'I've drunk [some] juice'.

    In «Я хочу сок/сока», both options are possible, and it doesn't change the meaning much.

    In other sentences, Duolingo makes an artificial distinction: сок = juice, сока = some juice. I'm not sure why this exact sentence doesn't follow the same convention.

    N. B. «Выпил» 'drunk' is the masculine form. I'm assuming you're male since Bill is a male name. The corresponding feminine form is «выпила».

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
    Caversham
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    <<In «Я хочу сок/сока», both options are possible, and it doesn't change the meaning much.>> I'll probably regret arguing, but there is a difference, ie I want the juice and I want some juice, ie partitive genitive. Another example: Дай хлеб and Дай хлеба = Give me the bread and Give me some bread. Can somebody please confirm.

    1 year ago

    [deactivated user]

      I've covered this in my message, please read the paragraphs above and below the text you've quoted:

      The exact distinction is a bit blurry, but accusative is usually used for things as a whole, and genitive is used for partial things. For example, you're more likely to use «Я выпил сок» 'I've drunk [the] juice' if you've finished the juice, and if you only had a glass of juice and there's something left, you're more likely to use «Я выпил сока» 'I've drunk [some] juice'.

      In «Я хочу сок/сока», both options are possible, and it doesn't change the meaning much.

      In other sentences, Duolingo makes an artificial distinction: сок = juice, сока = some juice. I'm not sure why this exact sentence doesn't follow the same convention.

      You're absolutely correct that it's a partitive genitive. However, you normally don't drink the whole juice in the world, so partitive genitive is acceptable in almost any context. Because, well, no matter how many you drink, you're never going to drink all the possible juice. You're still going to drink 'some' juice.

      If there were some modifiers (like «твой сок» vs. «твоего сока» 'your juice'), then the difference would be more prominent. «Выпил твой сок» is 'drunk up your juice', «выпил твоего сока» is 'drunk [some of] your juice', there's an obvious difference. (Duolingo requires translating this as 'drunk your juice' vs. 'drunk some of your juice', but that's a pretty artificial thing. In real texts, you don't always translate it with 'some'.)

      But in «выпил сок» vs. «выпил сока», there is little difference because it's obvious you didn't drink up all the existing juice in the world.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
      Caversham
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      Many thanks for your extensive elaboration. I'm a total beginner and still struggling to get to grips with Russian grammar. My earlier post was really just talking to myself. Again, Большое спасибо!!

      1 year ago

      [deactivated user]

        Is it always necessary to specify the pronoun in Russian? It marks нет хочу сока as false

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Beth332616

        From what i read earlier on, not it isn't, but for this lesson it is important to start with the basics and then move on to the more advanced techniques. These are not my words, but just pasisng thwm on !

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
        JewishPolyglot
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        no accusative?

        3 years ago

        [deactivated user]

          With uncountable nouns, you can use both accusative and genitive. Accusative shifts the meaning towards 'all the juice' or 'a portion of juice', while genitive shifts the meaning towards 'some juice'.

          3 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
          JewishPolyglot
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          Ah, so this is genitive ...right?

          3 years ago

          [deactivated user]

            Right.

            3 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
            JewishPolyglot
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            Here's a lingot for your help

            3 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/fite
            fite
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            But the issue of leaving out я is more of a colloquial issue, no? Also, aren't the genitive and accusitive forms for сок both сока?

            2 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/KinanHabbal
            KinanHabbal
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            Is cok accepted ?

            2 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
            Shady_arc
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            Is you are using transliteration, I am pretty sure it whould be "sok".

            2 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/jcs299
            jcs299
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            It should also accept <нет, я сок хочу> shouldn't it?

            2 years ago

            [deactivated user]

              This word order emphasises «хочу». You could use it in a context when the other speaker assumes you don't want juice, but you actually want it, so you emphasise «хочу» for contrast. It won't work well in other situations.

              I think «Нет, я сок хочу» is a translation for "No, I do want juice", and not for "No, I want juice".

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/jwbards
              jwbards
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              While you're correct, IMO the English sentence is ambiguous enough that both word orders s.b. accepted. I'd report it.

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Adam398586

              I would typically say cok not coka

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Samiwise

              Can't we omit ''я"?

              3 months ago
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