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  5. "La caída"

"La caída"

Translation:The fall

November 26, 2013

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiskPidge

Can anyone tell me if caída be used for both a) a physical sudden drop in the landscape like a cliff, and b) an accident where someone falls, or is it one of the two?

January 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

All of the above and a lot more. Make it masculine, and it's a fallen soldier.

January 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiskPidge

Ah, very interesting! Thanks very much for that answer.

January 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

Can it also be used for the season fall (or autumn)?

July 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiskPidge

I don't know about other Spanish speaking countries, but I'm fairly certain you wouldn't say this in European Spanish.

July 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

It's not in the dictionary, but see this poem: http://tinyurl.com/p6argcy :

July 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia_Williams2

No. Otono would be used for the season.

August 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheapeOne

Oh caer means TO fall, so caida means THE fall!

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusannaEDavis420

Yes! caer is the verb and caída is the related noun. There are so many words like this. It really helps us learn Spanish!

July 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

Do people use la caída to talk about the fall of Adam and Eve when they ate the forbidden fruit?

July 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlwynM

Yes, the Reina Valera 1977 translation of Genesis 3 talks about "Tentación, caída y primera promesa de redención" - in English, "Temptation, Fall and first promise of redemption".

Link to RVR1977

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

Love it. That's how to give a reference.

February 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

Should also be drop.

November 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

Report it. If Duolingo agrees they'll add your suggestions. Merely commenting won't do much.

November 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

I do. I know I have to use the time while I'm in the question to come up with any suggestions under report a problem.

November 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angie813925

can the 'slope' translation refer to a ski slope?

March 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboyer02

why is it also a slope?

December 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jindr004

The RAE gives this as the 8th definition of caido (da)

8. f. Declinación o declive de algo; p. ej., la de una cuesta a un llano.

This "hill on a plain" meaning is the reason why slope is an accepted translation. Otherwise caida appears to be much closer to fall in meaning.

The mathematical term for a slope is inclinación if you mean by degrees, or pendiente de la recta to describe the "rise over run".

January 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboyer02

When I was asked to pick all correct translations, DL gave me the options of: the fall, the drop, the slope. I only picked the first two. But DL marked it as wrong, that I should have picked all three. If I understand your question back to me, then 'la caída' does have the meaning of slope if I was talking about mathematics. Yes?

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

Lo siento. I'm over my head here in both English and Spanish. I was sleepily thinking of rise and fall, but the term is really "rise over run" (elevación sobre avance). WordReference doesn't connect caida to slope going either way. Yahoo does, and also to "declivity" (declive). I've never heard those words in my life. I'm going to guess it's not just real common usage. I know slope as la cuesta o la pendiente.

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

It is possibly related with activities or abstract concepts. Synonyms: decay, diminution, declension, declivity, downslope.
More precise words in Spanish for this: decaimiento, declive, disminución, mengua, deterioro. Mathematics: tangente.

Do you agree about "slope" is used in English that way? If not, that should be reported. Is "slope" uncommon?

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lafe55

I think it would be misleading in general conversation to have people learn that fall and slope are synonymous. The two words could only be considered synonymous in the sense of "degree off incline" or in mathematics and should only be suggested in those contexts, which are not so common in everyday conversation. Fall is caer or caerse in general conversation.

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

I don't think it's the usual translation for slope. Are you referring to la subida y caida in mathematics?

December 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If I translate it by "the fall" in English, there's an ambiguity about "the autumn", how can I say "the fall" in English in a way there's no doubt about it?

April 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiskPidge

Remember language is also largely based on context. If you were to say "my father had a fall" or "the fall of the roman empire" nobody's going to think you mean the Autumn. :) When talking about Autumn you'll be likely to use phrases like "in the fall" and "during the fall". There shouldn't be any problem in conversation.

April 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, I know, just wondering if there was another mean to say it.

April 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiskPidge

Possibly 'the drop', for a physical location like a cliff, or 'the descent' to describe the state of having fallen, could both be synonymous.

April 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lafe55

Disk pidge is right. If you think you might say something about the fall and be misunderstood and people will think you are meaning caer or caida or caerse, that would be very rare. The examples given by dispidge are good ones. You could say-my child had a bad fall-and there could be some confusion by native speakers but it would become clear quickly by your response to their question.

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antlered_Moose

Could this also be "the fallen one," or would that be "ella caída"?

February 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synergyzer07

'Caída' is used both to mean 'fall' and 'landing'? If so, how do I know what happened if "el avión ha caído"?

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

Say what? El avión aterriza. Un copo de nieve cae sobre su cabeza. A snowflake can fall on your head or land on your head. But if a plane falls on the runway, it's a disaster.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pedro.akcio

why not "the decay"?

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

There is a bit of overlap because a fall can be a decline and a decay can be a decline. But at least in WordReference, I could find no place where it actually said la caída could mean the decay.

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewGoo609044

the audio is not working for me so all of the listening questions I keep getting wrong because I have to skip

April 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthia_Pike

Can anyone tell me why there is the accent on the "i" since it is on the second to last syllable? (es grave,no?)

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

Because that's how you say it - cahEEda. El aire, AYreh, (air) doesn't have one.

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthia_Pike

Obviously, but generally there are no accents on the second to last syllable when it ends in a vowel or "n" or "s", it assumed that the accent is on the second to last syllable in that case unless marked otherwise. Caida ends in a vowel.

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1624

I'm missing something. Are you talking about this rule?: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100525051345AAOy535

July 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lafe55

I think it is because you are breaking a natural diphthong. "A" is a strong vowel, "i" is a weak vowel. So without the accent, the "ai" would not be stressed on the "i". I admittedly could be wrong. : )

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/logstoned

also hairloss?

November 26, 2016
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