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  5. "Ja, danke, Mann."

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleonoraonline

"Ja, danke, Mann."

January 8, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleonoraonline

Can this one be interpreted in the same way as it is in English, "Yeah thanks man"? Basically can "Mann" be used for "dude", "mate", "buddy" etc as well as to mean plain old "the man"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Yes, it can. But this - you may have guessed - is very colloquial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleonoraonline

Thanks! Yes it's the colloquial meaning that I wanted to check! (Sometimes Duolingo seems to throw together words a bit for the sake of a sentence, at least at this basic level when I know only a few words).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dincxjo

I have heard of the word 'alter' being used for 'dude'. Can anybody confirm if this is true?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Yes, but it's very slangy. If you want to sound like a 13 year old street kid – possibly with immigration background, 'Hey Alter, was geht?' is your choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dincxjo

Haha! I'll just stick with "Hallo, wie geht es Ihnen heute?' then :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronsnoswell

I was going to ask the exact same thing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aredic

Me as a german native speaker, I never used "Ja, danke, Mann" only "Ja, bitte" as accepting an offer or "Danke, Mann" for thanking, but you can also use "Danke".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dexez

Why isn't "Yes, thank, man" correct? The verb is in the first person, so it should work. So why the 's'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoopher

An English speaker would say "yes thanks", not "yes thank".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.p.j.labranche

Thanks is a (plural) noun in this form - not a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dexez

ok, now I see


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.p.j.labranche

This reminds me of a common mistake my Polish students make. They always say 'Thanks God' instead of 'Thank God,' which is what native English speakers say. We are essentially saying something like:

A I found my wallet. B (You should) Thank God.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoopher

I don't think it is. "danke" is short for "ich danke dir/euch/Ihnen" ("I thank you"). So a literal translation of "danke" would be the first person singular form of the verb, i.e. "thank" in English, as dexez said. But a literal translation, as is often the case, doesn't make sense. So we replace it with something an English speaker would actually say, like "thanks" (or "thank you").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoopher

I realized after posting my previous comment that m.p.j.labranche was talking about the English form being a noun. So I think we are agreeing!

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