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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Faighigí amach cén dóigh le cló Gaelach a chur anseo

Thanks to the information in this discussion, here’s one way in which Gaelic type can be used in the discussions here, as an alternative to Museo Sans Rounded.

EDIT #1: As of 2016-01-16, the mechanism in the forum software that allowed Gaelic type to be used is no longer available.

EDIT #2: The U.S. Extended input source in OS X was renamed to ABC Extended in OS X 10.11.

EDIT #3: As of 2016-08-23, version 11.000 of the Bunchló Ársa GC typeface is available.


What would be needed to see it in use?

A prerequisite for this method is that you’ll need to have an appropriate Gaelic typeface installed on your device; I’ve used Bunchló Ársa GC in the examples here. Since I have neither a tablet nor a smartphone, I don’t know if these devices allow typefaces to be installed on them. (In theory, the typeface could also be placed on a server, and the device would download the typeface on the fly whenever needed, but I don’t have access to a server with which to demonstrate that method through alterations of the examples below.)

The primary step is to install the typeface according to the usual method for your device’s operating system. If you use a browser to read the forums here, you might need to restart your browser for it to recognize the newly installed typeface; but try just refreshing the page first, to see if that would be sufficient.

Once that’s been done, the text below should appear in the installed typeface:

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}An ḃrataċ trí ḋaṫ .i. uaine, bán, agus flannḃuí, an suaiṫeantas náisiúnta.

If the text above appears in a serifed typeface rather than in a Gaelic typeface, then Bunchló Ársa GC isn’t being recognized as having been installed on your device.

(Note that .i. is a Latin scribal abbreviation still used in Irish, read as eadhon, meaning “viz”, “i.e.”, or “namely”.)


What would be needed to write in it?

The following is (for the most part) the formatting that was used to display the text above:

***{\@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}An ḃrataċ trí ḋaṫ .i. uaine, bán, agus flannḃuí, an suaiṫeantas náisiúnta.***

(The backslash needs to be removed from the formatting above; the backslash was added to prevent the formatting from being rendered as the text above. I’d actually specified a 14 point size because the original post of a discussion uses a larger font size than comments on it do, for which 12 point text is a better fit.)


Why does that work?

The formatting comes from CSS styling through an at-sign escape mechanism in the forum software. The font-family property specifies the name of the typeface to be displayed; the name is specified in two different ways, since e.g. OS X uses the PostScript font name found within a typeface rather than the usual font name. (The PostScript font name is the second name given above, and never uses accented letters; since embedded font names don’t necessarily use the same character set as the system software that scans the typeface, also specifying the PostScript name is a useful precaution.) The serif keyword is given as a fallback, in case the typeface is not installed or not recognized as being installed. The font-style and font-weight properties are given to override the default bold italic formatting of the Markdown triple-asterisk delimiters; these delimiters are being used here only as a grouping mechanism for the styling. The particular value for the font-size property was chosen to be a close match for the size of the Museo Sans Rounded typeface in the forums here. Other CSS properties could also be included, such as font variants (e.g. small caps), color (both foreground and background), borders, margins, etc.


Are there orthographic differences in using the cló Gaelach ?

In the cló Gaelach, it’s traditional to use a dot above a consonant to signify lenition rather than following the consonant with an h. The way to type the dotted consonants will vary by operating system; for example, under OS X, a dotted f can be entered fairly easily by using either the U.S. Extended input source or the Irish Extended input source, and then pressing Option w followed by f. There’s also an ampersand equivalent in Gaelic type called a “Tironian et”, read as agus or is, shaped something like the digit 7, which can be seen in the orc entry below between na huirc and na heairc ; it can be entered using the U.S. Extended input source in OS X by pressing Option Shift ; followed by 7. (I don’t know why it’s not also available in the Irish Extended input source.)

Older texts can reveal some orthographic differences; for example, lena cat (“with her cat”) could be presented as {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}le n-a cat instead.


Is there subject matter that would benefit from its use?

Using the cló Gaelach allows a more accurate reproduction of content from (often public domain) older books, such as these entries from Dinneen’s 1904 dictionary:

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Alabárd, -áird, pl. id., m., anything out of proportion, as a small {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}garsún hurling with a tall man’s {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}camán (W. Ker.).

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Breill-ṁéaraċ, -aiġe, a., having lumpy fingers.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Cneasuiḋe, g. id., pl. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}-ḋṫe, a comrade, companion, a bed-fellow (one that joins his skin to another’s); a surgeon, a healer, one that brings on a skin.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Drúiċtín, g. id., m., a light dew; a species of small whitish snail. On May morning girls discovered the colour of the hair of their future husbands from the shade of colouring of the first {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}drúiċtín they found: cf. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}ċuaiḋ sí ar lorg a drúiċtín.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Eadarscáil, -ála, f., act of separating quarrellers (Cork).

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Fo-ḋord, -ḋoird, m., a murmuring of bees; back-biting; a conspiracy.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Gúngaire, g. id., pl. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}-riḋe, m., a narrow-loined, awkward person.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Hurrú! interj., hurru! an exclamation of triumph or defiance.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Iondual, a., usual, customary; {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}is iondual an Aoine ag báistiġ, Friday frequently proves wet (Con. saying).

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Luim-linn, f., a pond of new milk.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Marḃ-ċat, m., a dead and alive person.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}’Nuas, anuas ({@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}’n-uas, a n-uas), down from above, from a height, after verbs of motion; cf. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}siúd suas é, gura’ mó anuas é, lo! it goes up, may it be greater coming down (a nursery expression, used in lifting a child in arms).

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Orc, g. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}uirc, pl. id., m., a small hound, a beagle, a lapdog; a pig; a whale; a torpedo-fish; {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}do ġeall na huirc ⁊ na heairc, he promised anything and everything.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Peiṫniḋeaċ, -ḋiġ, pl. id., m., a big, stout, lazy person or beast; anything stout and heavy.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Réim-ċion, m., a career of affection; a sway of love.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Smaiċtín, g. id., pl. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}-niḋe, m., a short baton or club, a mallet or cudgel; {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}smaiċtín crón, a kind of tobacco formerly smuggled into Ireland, and hence the name of a popular air.

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Treas-loḃaḋ, m., soreness between the toes caused by perspiration, etc. (Aran).

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}Uairseaċ, -siġe, -a, f., a cow that is running dry or losing her milk (also {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}uairsneaċ).

(The sheet music to {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14pt}An smaċdín crón is the last song in Part III of The Complete Collection of Irish Music.)

November 18, 2015

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

One bit of typographic trivia is that the third character of the word “viz” is properly a Tironian et, since the word is a contraction of Latin videlicet, which itself is a contraction of videre licet (“it’s permitted to see”).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eikoopmit

Well then, this is certainly useful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjcrjc7313

go raibh maith agat. when i finished my tree in the standard font i'm definitely gonna go back and try it with this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Please reread the top of this post; this feature has not been available since January 2016.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FearDorcha5

I too have the Bunchló Ársa GC typeface, but I don't see your post in this font; it remains as line upon line of formatting instructions. In order to use fully the features of Bunchló I had to install GLE Irish Cló Gaelach keyboard as well. This soft keyboard is freely available to download, and simple to install.

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