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https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo

AMA with Tim Morley (TEDx: Learn Esperanto First)

amuzulo
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Welcome to our AMA (Ask Me Anything) with Tim Morley!

...and it's over! Enjoy reading the comments below.

Esperanto

Tim Morley estas 40-iom-jaraĝa brito, kiu eklernis Esperanton en 2001, dum li loĝis kaj laboris en Francio. Li spertas i.a. pri instruado de lingvoj, programado de komputiloj, kaj lingvistiko. En 2012 li faris TEDx-prelegon pri la instruado de Esperanto kiel unua fremda lingvo. Li ofte instruas klason dum la Somera Esperanto-Studado en Slovakio.

Li nun instruas la francan al junaj infanoj en Kembriĝo, Britio, kie li loĝas kun siaj edzino kaj du infanoj. La familianoj estas dulingvaj (angle/france).

Li pretas respondi demandojn en Esperanto, la franca aŭ la angla.

Français

Tim Morley est un britannique de 42 ans, qui a appris l'espéranto en 2001 pendant un séjour de quelques années en Bretagne. Son expertise est dans l'enseignement des langues étrangères, la programmation et la linguistique. En 2012 il a fait un discours TEDx à propos de l'enseignement de l'espéranto comme première langue étrangère. Il s'est souvent retrouvé parmi les profs de l'Ecole d'été de l'Espéranto en Slovakie.

Actuellement il enseigne le français à l'école primaire à Cambridge, où il habite avec sa femme bretonne et leurs deux enfants ; toute la famille est bilingue anglais-français (mais malheureusement on ne parle pas breton).

Vous pouvez poser vos questions en français, en anglais ou bien sûr en Espéranto.

English

Tim Morley is a 40-something-year-old Brit whose Esperanto adventure started in 2001, while he was living in France. He is experienced in language teaching, computer programming, and linguistics. In 2012 he did a TEDx talk about using Esperanto to introduce children to foreign language learning. He has often led a class at the Summer Esperanto School in Slovakia.

He now teaches French to young children in Cambridge, where he lives with his wife and two children. The family all use French and English daily.

You can ask questions in English, French or of course in Esperanto!

Also see: Esperanto AMA schedule

2 years ago

52 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
Mod
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Would you rather fight 100 duck-sized horses or 1 horse-sized duck?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ooh, I've never been much of a fighter. I think I'd try to talk them round.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HwanSpeaks

Hi Tim,

First of all, I just want to say, "Dankegon!" Your TEDx talk was the reason I decided to start learning Esperanto. It has only been a few weeks, but learning Esperanto has been one of the most exciting and meaningful things I have done in a while.

My question to you is: Do you think learning Esperanto as a first foreign language would help with learning non-European languages?

I speak Korean and English and have studied Spanish for a few years, and I can definitely see how learning Esperanto could help with learning other European languages and how easy Esperanto would be for speakers of European languages. I can also see how much easier Esperanto would be to my Korean friends compared to any other European languages and how learning Esperanto first would help them learn other European languages more easily and quickly, too.

With that said, I want to ask if you think learning Esperanto would help with learning non-European languages, particularly Asian languages. So far, I have yet to notice any similarities between Esperanto and Korean, and I can't imagine learning Esperanto from Korean even though my native language is Korean. I've read some people saying that the agglutinative nature of Esperanto is similar to some Asian languages, but I want to ask if you have more insight about Esperanto as a springboard for non-European languages.

Thank you!

Amike, Nathan

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ne dankinde! :-) Mi tre ĝuis la tutan aferon.

"learning Esperanto has been one of the most exciting and meaningful things I have done in a while" <— yep, I'd say exactly the same thing myself. It has made a difference to my life in ways that I never imagined when I took it up.

"Do you think learning Esperanto as a first foreign language would help with learning non-European languages?" <— well, I'll answer two separate questions there: (1) Do I think it will help? — I'm inclined to say "probably, yes, in certain circumstances". Learners of Esperanto typically make progress much more quickly than learners of other languages, and very often attain a level of fluency that far exceeds what they would in other languages. Simply having had that experience is beneficial to future language learning, and many of the skills learnt through Esperanto are likely to help out. (2) Will it help? — I couldn't possibly say, either for your specific case, or in general.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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En via prelego de TEDx, vi komparis la instruadon de E-o al la instruado de bekfluto. Laŭ mia memoro, vi diris ke la celo ne estas krei popolon da bekflutistoj sed enkonduki homojn al instrumento, kiu helpos al ili regi pli kompleksan instrumenton poste. Same la celo de Springboard ne estas krei popolon da eo-parolantoj, sed utiligi ĝin pro ĝia tiel nomata "propedeŭtika valoro" por ke oni pli facile lernu plia(j)n lingvo(j)n.

Mi ne dubas ke ĉio ĉi estas vera. La celoj de kurso estas klaraj. Tamen, kiel Esperantisto, ĉu ne restas al vi iom da espero ke kelkaj el la lernintoj daŭre uzos E-on?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Denove bona demando. :) Vi prave klarigas, ke la celo de Springboard ne rilatis al la ĝenerala Esperanto-movado, sed vi egale prave anticipis mian esperon — certe estus grandega plezuro renkonti junulon dum iu E-aranĝo, kiun mi lastfoje vidis en bazlerneja klasĉambro. (Nu, restas nur kelketaj jaroj ĝis kiam la plej aĝaj atingos la aĝon por ekvojaĝi al junularaj aranĝoj...)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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Ĉu alia(j) e-isto(j) nun instruas la kurson?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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La klas-instruistoj daŭrigis la Esperanto-kurson dum kelkaj jaroj, sed kiam ili forlasis la lernejon, la programo malaperis, bedaŭrinde.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShanaThomp

One of the best reasons I've ever heard to learn Esperanto came from your TedTalk - learn it first and it'll help with the acquisition of other languages afterwards. I'm wondering what the impact was of your TedTalk on schools, on other teachers and on just normal people, like me. Did any schools start to offer it? Did learners reach out to you and thank you?

I'm always curious what happens after a TedTalk is over:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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I think I can safely say that we're, er, still waiting for the flood of schools wanting to start teaching the programme. ;-) What I can tell you though is that at many of the Esperanto events that I've attended since, there are usually a handful of people who recognise me and say something along the lines of "Hey, you're the reason that I'm here!" Which is nice. :-)

That's kind of the nature of it, I suppose — self-motivated learners (the kind of people who watch TED talks!) will watch it and think, "Hey, that sounds great, I'm gonna do it!" and they go off and do it. In schools though... even the most motivated and innovative teacher can't just decide to adopt a whole new programme on a whim; even if the headteacher is convinced, there's still the local authority who'll have a say, there's the National Curriculum to, um, work around, and that's before you've started convincing any of the parents that it's a good idea...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShanaThomp

Wow, that sounds much more complicated than I'd imagined. It makes me wonder if there are ways for outsiders to help during the process.... a stronger force of advocates, student success stories and other types of good PR?

In any case, you're one of the main reasons I'm here! If only I had learned Esperanto before French and German :/ Next time haha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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I think that's probably all for tonight. Thank you for your questions, I've enjoyed answering them. See you on the forum, in the Facebook group, or at an upcoming Esperanto event. Come and say hello! https://www.facebook.com/groups/duolingo.esperanto.learners

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

How did you meet Kelly Clarkson and how did you convince her to learn Esperanto? *Edit never mind about the Kelly Clarkson question, I just watch the video with you and Kelly hehehe New Question: how did you first learn about Esperanto?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ooh, your question's changed since I started answering it! I honestly can't remember the very first time I heard of Esperanto or discovered anything about it, but the first actual contact I had with the world of Esperanto was when I finished reading one of Harry Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat books; in his stories, each time a character from an unknown planet arrives, they exchange a few words in Esperanto with the protagonist, since that's "the language of the galaxy" in their world; and at the end of the book, the last page says something like, "In the future, everyone speaks Esperanto. Now what about you? Write to this address for a free course..." And so I did. That was in 1997.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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How did I meet Kelly Clarkson? Ha, well, if you've seen the relevant video clip, then you've already seen the first moment when I met Kelly Clarkson. I knew beforehand that she was going to be on the show at the same time as me, but I didn't actually meet her until we were live on TV in front of a couple of million viewers. :)

FWIW she was fun to talk to, and we had a chat during the commercial break afterwards too. I'd love to say that we've kept in touch in the intervening years and she pops by for coffee when she's in the area, but I'd be lying through my teeth if I did.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

Hahaha tre amuza Dankon por viaj respondoj :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mutusen
Mutusen
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If a horse goes behind a building and then comes out again, does it count as a new horse?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ah, an excellent question, and the answer is a resounding Yes. As explained under the heading "What does 'novel' mean?" in the Official Rules of HORSE!, a "novel horse either a horse that has not been claimed, or else a horse which has been claimed but which has ceased to have the potential to be seen by all players". It goes on to give an example: "A horse that has been claimed but which canters behind a (large) tree to disappear from view only to come out the other side can be re-claimed." http://www.hor.se.com/rules

I think it should be obvious even to an inexperienced player that a "building" can take the place of the aforementioned "large tree" for these purposes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Interesantoj pri ĈEVALO! povas spekti enkondukon al la Bazaj Reguloj ĉi tie. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZKDHcdKMt4

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrg635
jrg635
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I understand that after learning one foreign language, the next language comes easier. I believe this is one of your reasons why Esperanto is useful. My native language is English and I have a fairly good knowledge of Spanish (I wouldn't say I'm conversational yet, but I'm close). As someone who is already somewhat bilingual, do you think that learning Esperanto would help me learn future languages, or is successfully learning Spanish sufficient to make learning a third (and fourth and fifth) language easier?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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It's difficult to give a concrete "yes" or "no" answer, but allow me to talk around the topic for a short while, if I may.

You know that moment when you're hiking in the mountains, you've been at it for a few hours, you're starting to get hungry, and you think, "No, I'll hang on and eat my sandwiches at the top, we're nearly there," and then just as you get close to "the top", you realise that the actual peak of the mountain is another few miles away, and another few thousand feet higher up?

And when you get close to there, it happens again?

And have you ever had a conversation with someone much younger than you, who's just read a book/done a college course/read an article about your profession, and wants to tell you all about it, and you have to bite your tongue to stop yourself from saying, "Yeah, but..." every 5 seconds?

You can probably see where I'm leading with this, and having just re-read the last paragraph in particular I'm wondering whether I'm patronising even myself, sorry!... but this is what I wanted to say: I can see you've got to level 21 in Spanish on Duolingo, and that's excellent, well done! (And I do mean that sincerely, it is an achievement to be proud of). And you describe your own level as "not conversational yet, but close". That's great... but in terms of learning a foreign language, it's still only paddling in the shallow end of an enormous pool. Sorry to break it to you!

So, would it be any different in Esperanto? I can't guarantee anything for you specifically, but what I can say is that at almost every Esperanto event I've been to, I've encountered people who were taking part in conversations comfortably who hadn't actually spoken the language other than to a computer or a book before.

If I can switch metaphors again (!), it's getting off the runway and actually flying with a language, thinking in the language, dreaming in it, having it flow naturally from your mouth... that's the experience that you're aiming for, that will set you in good stead for future learning. And Esperanto has a far better chance of delivering that experience to you than Spanish.

Go for it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Good evening, all! Or morning, or afternoon, as required.

Official kick-off time is in an hour (20:00 UTC+0) but I'll be perusing questions before then too, so fire away. See y'all in an hour!

Respondoj komencos aperi post la oficiala eko, je la 20:00 UTC, sed ne hezitu starigi demandojn antaŭe. Ĝis tiam!

Ca commence dans une heure officiellement, mais n'hésitez pas d'afficher vos questions ci-dessous tout de suite. A+!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcbrunner
jcbrunner
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The language learning drop-out/attrition rates are brutal, even for a well designed application like Duolingo (though they do not give out numbers). Any further ideas how the drop-out rate can be reduced and the learning turned into a habit?

An Esperanto question: For me, Esperanto has always been what economists call a "dominated" option, a never used spare tyre. Esperanto meetings apart, where does Esperanto stand the best chance of becoming the language of choice?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Drop-out rates on any elective course are brutal — web design, dress making, Arabic, Esperanto, you name it. That even applies to courses that cost an outrageous amount of money. (/me looks around, sheepishly raises hand...)

How to change that? Other than obvious answers like "make the course as engaging as possible", I'm not sure I have any great pearls of wisdom to offer there, sorry, although I do like the gamification aspect of Duolingo.

Tangent: peope sometimes accuse Esperanto words of sounding a bit clumsy, with bits just glued together haphazardly with ugly results. Well I'm sorry, but ludigo sounds like it just popped out of the packaging ready-made when you compare it to the horror of "gamification" (bleurgh!).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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I propose the more horrific "ludaspektigeco" or perhaps "ludŝajnigecigo".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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If you really want to capture the full flavour of gamificationalisationhood, then yeah, they're pretty good attempts. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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As to your Esperanto question... well, you might be assuming that I actually want to see Esperanto become the number one go-to inter-language the world over, and that's a whole separate question (to which my short answer is, "Kinda").

To take the question at face value though, where/how might it come about, there are all sorts of ways that it could happen... but none of them have happened yet. It's a bit like speculating in the 1980s, "What will trigger the fall of the Berlin Wall?" Could have been anything, and the actual trigger was almost comically random.

So: it could be a large multinational company, probably a non-US one, that realises a lot of work-hours are being lost because of language difficulties, and decides to make a long-term bet on training its employees to use Esperanto with each other. Maybe Esperanto gets introduced as an extra language in some existing multi-lingual organisation like the EU or the UN, and slowly gains ground there. Maybe every headteacher in the land stumbles on my TEDx talk and spontaneously starts a Springboard course the following week. One can dream...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalTrans

Hello Tim! How often do you find yourself using Esperanto non-verbally, and what would your advice be for folks like me who don't often have an opportunity for verbal communication in Esperanto?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Hey there! Thanks for the question. My advice to you specifically would be, "Come visit me!" but more generally ;-) it's a question that I answer all the time for different groups of learners, and different people take to different things. Some people (yep, me included) tend to talk to themselves all the time anyway, so it's not much of an effort to switch that to Esperanto as often as possible, just for the practice. If you find you don't remember to do it very often, choose something to remind you, e.g. every time you see something yellow, say at least a couple of sentences to yourself about what's going on right now.

Other people label stuff around their homes in whatever language they're learning. It's helps with vocab, and again, you can use the post-it note as a cue to say a sentence to your cat about what you're up to. Once you know all the "furniture" vocab, switch some of the post-its for new words, with either a translation or (better) an untranslated sentence containing the word in context. So, picking a word at random... infero — you'd go to http://tekstaro.com/ and search for "infero", you'd pick an example (e.g. from Don Kiĥoto: "tio ĉi ja estas la infero, aŭ almenaŭ la purgatorio") and copy it onto your post-it, and say it to yourself each time your eyes fall on it.

You can always Skype people.

You can look up a conversation partner on http://ChatterPlot.com/ and talk to them.

You can look up a teacher on http://italki.com/ and pay a few dollars for an online course with them.

Or, y'know, call me. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

Kion vi opinias pri la esperantidoj?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ili memorigas min pri la usona literumado. La celo de Noah Webster, kiam li kreis la novan literumadon, estis simpligi, plibonigi, plilogikigi la aferon. La rezulto estas simple alia sistemo, egale facile (t.e. egale malfacile) lernebla, kun eble 5% de la strangaĵoj forigitaj sed kiu konservas 95% el ili; kaj nun ni simple havas du sistemojn lernendajn anstataŭ unu. Neniu gajnas.

Kaj kun Ido k.a., la tre malgrandaj "avantaĝoj" kiujn ili prezentas estas nenio kontraŭ la fakto, ke la simpla ekzisto de pluraj konkurencantaj lingvoj por la sama rolo malplifortigas ilin ĉiujn.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

Ah bone Dankon :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meddysong
Meddysong
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Somebody's started learning Esperanto, done reasonably well with their Duolingo course, read a couple of books, and so on. But there's the crucial next step to take: immersion. What do you recommend?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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I'd recommend giving up at that point. You have Finished™.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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No, I jest, there are loads of next steps you can take.

Look up your national Esperanto association. Wherever you live, there probably is one, and most of them run courses of varying sizes, formats and durations. In the UK where I live, there are weekend courses near Stoke a few times a year, and one-day "Diskut-rondoj" in different places around the country too.

If you're feeling brave — and you don't really need to be all that brave — sign up to an event in a different country. You'll be under a bit more pressure to actually use your Esperanto rather than falling back on your home language, but the atmosphere at Esperanto events is generally very friendly and supportive, and you'll get so much more from your time there.

Or, if you can't travel, use ChatterPlot or italki.com as already mentioned above to find people to chat with and/or teach you further.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meddysong
Meddysong
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(This is Dika, giving you a loaded question if ever there were one!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPingvino
LaPingvino
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When will we meet again?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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In thunder, lightning, or in rain, I expect. http://genius.com/1766635

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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^Bit of impromptu Shakespeare there. :)

So, when shall we meet again? It's been a few years, hasn't it? The answer is almost certainly "the next time we happen to sign up to the same Esperanto event". Maybe Easter 2016, if you make it to Italy...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andi_M
Andi_M
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Ho, plia kialo por mi viziti la IJF en Italio. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Ĝis tiam, Andi! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pwells19

Hello Tim!

I always wondered why you took up Esperanto? Did you always know you wanted to teach it, or were there other motivations?

Amike, Phillip

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Saluton Phillip!

When I first took it up, I had no idea I would ever actually teach it, like, properly in a classroom, and earn money from it. Nothing was further from my mind!

As mentioned a couple of answers ago, I'd had a go at learning it in 1997, but had to put it aside for more urgent matters. But then in 2001, I started a new job and, completely by chance, the guy sitting opposite me in the office happened to be a fluent Esperanto speaker, who'd taught it in a university, was bringing up his daughters as first language Esperanto speakers, etc. As soon as I found that out, I asked him to teach me, he set up a weekly course after work, and the rest is history.

My prime motivation at the time was the Pasporta Servo, because I've always loved travelling, and I loved the idea of being able to stay with people and talk to them. And I've made good use of it too.

Rather than write any more here though, I'm going to refer you to the long blog post that I wrote a few years ago to answer the very same question: https://timsk.wordpress.com/2006/08/04/response-to-nicole-martinelli/ You can also read 20 or so answers from other people in the comments. Enjoy!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanege
Vanege
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Ĉu vi havas konsilojn, por tiuj, kiuj ŝatus instrui Esperanton profesie?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Nu, unue, oni agnosku, ke postenoj por Esperanto-instruistoj estas tre maloftaj! Estas pli da ebloj ene de la movado mem — plej multaj E-aranĝoj havas almenaŭ iun kurson, kaj kelkaj aranĝoj organiziĝas ĉefe por instruado, do certe unu el tiuj estus bona komenco-loko.

Se vi volas fari ion similan al la projekto Springboard to Languages, tio estas multege malpli facila. Unue, havu iom da sperto kaj trejnado kiel instruisto; sen tio, kiu lernejo dungus vin? Poste, provu havi ian longdaŭran kontakton kun la direktoro de loka(j) lernejo(j). Akiru reputacion kiel lerta lingvisto, respektita instruisto, kaj afabla homo. Proponu prelegon pri Esperanto en la lernejo, eventuale uzante mian TEDx-prelegon kiel enkondukilon. Kaj tiam, proponu similspecan kurson. Kaj preĝu!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Mi ĵus rimarkis vian uzantonomo kaj mi demandas min ĉu ĝi iel rilatas al via demando... ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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Also, if anyone is curious, here's all the questions I asked Tim already about his appearance on the Paul O'Grady show: http://blogs.transparent.com/esperanto/kelly-clarkson-speaks-esperanto/

And since there should be a question here... have you ever appeared on TV some other time? :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Yep, I've been on TV and radio a number of times, usually related to Esperanto one way or another. If you put "tim morley esperanto" into YouTube, you'll find most of 'em. Enjoy!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evannex

Since speaking and using a language is the best way to attain fluency, what would you suggest as a good way to immerse yourself in Esperanto? Obviously there isn't a country one can go to for immersion, but (to me) in person communication is better than online things, even though talking with people online is also great. What would you suggest for those of us who have no Esperanto groups, meetups, conferences, etc. for hundreds of miles?

And a secondary, but related question. Do you have any tips for starting a group or meetup (where to find people, where to have the meeting, what to DO at a meetup, etc.)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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There might be an Esperanto group or event near you that you don't know about. If you tell us where you are, we might know someone who knows someone... If there's no-one nearby though, I really would recommend travelling with Esperanto. It's one of the cheapest ways to travel, because a lot of your accommodation will be free of charge in spare bedrooms at Esperanto-speakers' houses, and you get to talk to your hosts, find out what makes them tick. It can be an amazing experience.

As for organising your own Esperanto event, I would try some combination of Facebook and MeetUp to see if you can get the ball rolling. If you really can't find any existing Esperanto speakers, talk to your local college about putting on a language course, get it in their prospectus next September, advertise an information evening with a free glass of wine for everyone, suggest people watch my TEDx talk as an introduction, and see if you can get a course going. Download an existing course (e.g. Gerda Malaperis which you can find on Lernu.net), and get people to use Duolingo alongside it in their own time.

Final point though, on what to actually do at group meetings... well, I've left this to the end because I have to confess, I'm not sure what the answer is. What I can say is that I don't actually know very many Esperanto speakers in my own country. I didn't learn the language to help me to meet other British people; I do plenty of that already. And I've never been a member of a local club, or particularly had the inclination to start one. That said, I do have the opportunity to travel fairly regularly and use my Esperanto that way, so perhaps if that option were absent, I might be more enthusiastic about the next best thing instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evannex

Ah yes both Chuck and Evildea(from youtube) have looked into places near me, and many people point me to chatterplot but honestly the nearest people or events to me are at least two hours by car. So that's not really an option. ^_^

I had never even thought of the college idea, that's quite amazing! I might just have to look into that, thank you. As for travelling, I'd love to do that as well but for now I think I need to learn to speak better first.

Anyways, thanks for the great responses! I'm trying to convince my mom to let me teach Esperanto to my little sister (she's 9) , since I think it would make later language classes in school much easier, and I actually used your TEDx talk as my baseline for my argument. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMorley3
MrMorley3
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Well, best of luck with it. Your sister might just be too old to enjoy Mazi en Gondolando... but then again, she might not! Give it a go: http://tinyurl.com/mazivideos

Otherwise, get her started on Duolingo. I've used it with 9-10 year olds with some success.

Good luck!

2 years ago