"Я не люблю футбол, баскетбол лучше."

Translation:I do not like football; basketball is better.

November 19, 2015

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/matscientist

Since there have been a number of sentences like this now, I am wondering: is it correct in Russian to have two independent sentences separated only by a comma?

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mosfet07

Yes, it's correct. These are two parts of one sentence, both belong to the subject (I).
However, don't try to combine two unrelated phrases: Я не люблю баскетбол, хорошая погода.

November 19, 2015

[deactivated user]

    > both belong to the subject (I).

    I personally think they don't. I believe subject in the first one is «я», in the second one it's «баскетбол».

    November 19, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/mosfet07

    Yes I agree. I meant that the second part is that what the person from the first part believes.

    Ok, here is more complex example from "War and Peace" (Lev Tolstoy):

    И тотчас же ему пришла в голову мысль, что данное слово ничего не значит, потому что еще прежде, чем князю Андрею, он дал также князю Анатолю слово быть у него; наконец, он подумал, что все эти честные слова — такие условные вещи, не имеющие никакого определенного смысла, особенно ежели сообразить, что, может быть, завтра же или он умрет, или случится с ним что-нибудь такое необыкновенное, что не будет уже ни честного, ни бесчестного.

    The thought immediately occurred to him that his promise to Prince Andrew was of no account, because before he gave it he had already promised Prince Anatole to come to his gathering; "besides," thought he, "all such 'words of honor' are conventional things with no definite meaning, especially if one considers that by tomorrow one may be dead, or something so extraordinary may happen to one that honor and dishonor will be all the same!"

    I'll try to dig deeper, so correct me if I'm wrong.

    Here we have a compound sentence.

    The conjunctions что (that) and потому что (because) which introduce a new dependent clause, are preceded by a comma:

    И тотчас же ему пришла в голову мысль, что данное слово ничего не значит

    The clause started with the conjunction чем (than) is enclosed with commas:

    прежде, чем князю Андрею, ...

    Then after the semicolon comes the second part.

    The adverb наконец (in the end) is a parenthetical word and is enclosed with commas:

    ,(;) наконец, он подумал

    Here is the dangling participle (имеющий), enclosed with commas too:

    вещи, не имеющие никакого определенного смысла,

    может быть is a parenthetical word again:

    что, может быть, завтра же

    The conjunction или (either) corresponds to "either ..., or ...":

    или он умрет, или случится с ним что-нибудь

    The conjunction ни (not) corresponds to "neither ..., nor ...":

    не будет уже ни честного, ни бесчестного

    November 19, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/matscientist

    Wow, thanks for the detailed example. I can't really understand the text yet, but I can at least find the conjunctions. My original question was about comma usage when there is no conjuction, but this is interesting.

    November 19, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/matscientist

    OK, so it is something like "Я лучше люблю баскетбол?" Does this only happen when the clauses have the same grammatical subject, or can it happen for two different sentences about the same topic?

    November 19, 2015

    [deactivated user]

      Я лучше люблю баскетбол?

      «Лу́чше люблю́» sounds unnatural to me, it would be «бо́льше люблю́». This sentence has different subjects: "I", "basketball" (the English sentence has the same grammatic structure).

      The rules (§ 138) say that the comma is used in such situation only when clauses are 'closely connected by meaning'. I'm not sure what this means exactly, I personally tend to put semicolons only when the clauses I join have commas inside, so separating them by a comma would make their structure unclear.

      November 19, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/matscientist

      This is quite clear now. Большое спасибо!

      November 19, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/Randonneur3

      Modern English uses two sentences here, if there is no connecting word or phrase. Duo is happy too.

      April 6, 2019
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