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https://www.duolingo.com/LukeVanHanne

When will Chinese be offered as a language. It seems like it should be a priority over Klingon.

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MediaStoat

Yes, it should. So many major world languages are unrepresented and yet time and resources are being wasted on a fictional language with no native speakers, a tiny lexicon and maybe a hundred people in the world who are able to use it at all, for no real communicatory purpose.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abe_tz
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I want Chinese because I do Chinese Martial Arts

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
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The team that built the English course for speakers of Chinese is still working on that course, which is still in beta. There is more information at https://incubator.duolingo.com/courses/en/zh-CN/status .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoupandPie
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Meanwhile there are other resources outside of Duolingo that are also great, and teaches Chinese such as Chineseskills, or HelloChinese, both of them feature Duo-like interfaces and teaches you Chinese. It would be more productive if you want to learn Chinese to utilize the other resources outside of Duolingo now rather than waiting for an uncertain date in the future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halek10
halek10
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If anything's clear from the Discussion section, it's that everybody wants every language right now. I'm no fluent speaker, but I know enough Chinese to understand the massive issues that would accompany trying to adapt it to a literal translation-based format like this. If they can surmount those obstacles someday, that would e great, but I could totally understand if they saw it as too tough to manage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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I'm sure it is prioritized above Klingon, it's just that it's easier to build a course for Klingon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Exactly.

All other things being equal, I'm sure Chinese would be in before Klingon.

Unfortunately, all other things are not equal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedram11

and japanese!! when will the japanese course come out??!!! we need the japanese course!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
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I'm sure it will be offered at some point. However, it is not yet a course, due its wild differences with all other Duo languages. Duolingo, so far, only teaches languages that offer an alphabet. At first, it only taught languages of the latin alphabet, and variations of the latin alphabet, but is now expanding to other alphabets, such as Hindi, Cyrillic, Hebrew and Greek. Recently, added its first agglutinated language, Turkish, and is adding more of these, such as Swahili and Hungarian. As of now, Duo is taking massive steps in terms of the types of languages it teaches, and it should not be too long until Chinese is added. However, the issue, again, with Chinese, is that it has NO alphabet, and uses a system of characters instead. It also requires people to use a Pinyin (拼音)keyboard. As such, Duo will have to teach both the characters and the pinyin for those characters. In order for the characters to be properly learnt, they will have to be taught in a separate lesson, after the Pinyin is taught. As such, this would take twice the amount of work, and double the length of the tree. Whilst it is entirely possible, and will eventually be added, Duo first needs to cover languages that have a structured alphabet, which means that it may be a while before it is added.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elisabeth3789
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I'm not sure about Chinese, but when I first learned Japanese a few decades ago, I used the Linguaphone course, and it had NO Chinese characters or pinyin, except for a brief appendix section. It used the latin alphabet for transcription and I think Duo could do the same thing! At least as a starter option. That way, they could release their course much sooner, or at least the starter version... I would be very happy with that before the whole thing gets ready.

I did end up studying Kanji etc. when I took Japanese in college, but having the basic knowledge was extremely helpful.

In the meantime, I'm learning other languages (see above) and I find it fun and beneficial.

1 year ago