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"My grandfather fell."

Translation:Mi abuelo se cayó.

4 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kmlesciotto

Why is the "se" needed - why couldn't it just be "mi abuelo cayo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

There has been much discussion on this. It seems 'caer' means both drop and fall and is used reflexively to mean fall, as opposed to dropping something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Oddly, Duo said Mi abuelo cayó on my lesson page (correcting me for using the personal "a"), but when I tapped to come to the forum, it added the "se." H-m-m-m. Consistency would be good!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estu12

Would "A mi abuelo cayo" or "A mi abuelo se cayo" both be the most gramatically correct (vs "Mi abuelo cayo" or "Mi abuelo se cayo")? Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Apparently, the "a" is not needed because we have the defining possessive "mi," but they do want the reflexive "se" before the verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Abuelo is the subject not the object so no personal a.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tin-Naz
Tin-Naz
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Thanks for explanation! But in another question, I translated "My grandfather fell." to "Mi abuelo cayó." and got it correct. What would we explain that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Yeah, me too. I mentioned the inconsistency a couple of comments above. I was surprised to see it was so long ago! Well, an idiom in the USA is, "Time flies when you're having fun!" :o)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

It appears that DL is allowing for the fact that "caer" is not always reflexive.
Reflexive verbs are confusing enough. However, I did a little more digging and found this forum discussion:

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/151480/what-is-the-difference-between-caer-and-caerse

While it had some helpful information, the consensus of the discussion was that there really is not any hard and fast rule as to whether or not to use the reflexive pronoun. Another helpful link I found is the following:

http://study.com/academy/lesson/caer-vs-caerse.html

It seems that there are really only general guidelines that indicate the reflexive pronouns should be used with this verb for people and accidental events, but even then it depends on the desired emphasis

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyBabcock
JeremyBabcock
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Better have Life Alert...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
jonathanbost
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Yeah, I know, I have a Life Alert to tell me when I get one!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Got it wrong. Why is it "se" and not "le?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chadrspain

Its reflexive, if the grandfather "fell" or perhaps dropped something else or another person it would be le or la, but he fell down himself which is reflexive so its se

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanzoArkan

Excellent reply. Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmniGlot2000

Ouch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miry23
miry23
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Can I say my grandfather fell down?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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Yes, that is a reasonable translation. (I can't say whether or not it is in DL's database for this question. It was accepted in another item, though.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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It accepted 'mi abuelo cayó'. Since it did not say that he 'fell down' I thought the 'se' might not be needed. It sounds like it's better to include the 'se' anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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It really is. It could be "cayó," but really only if someone was carrying him and dropped him, causing him to fall.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amodia
Amodia
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Why not "A mi abuelo" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lbc2world

I was wondering that too. It seems that when referring to specific people, the "a" must be added, but, apparently not in this case?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/celanba
celanba
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You're referring to the "personal a," I think. You only use it when the direct object of a sentence is a person (or sometimes a pet). In this case, the only person in the sentence is the subject, not the object. If you wanted to give more backstory on this to add the "personal a," you could say, "Mi abuela empujó a mi abuelo, y entonces mi abuelo se cayó."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lbc2world

Thank you, Celanba, that helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/celanba
celanba
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No problem!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

lbc2 and celanba, I was told in a previous lesson that when the person or beloved pet already has a modifier such as "my" or "your," that the personal "a" was unnecessary. If that is NOT correct, will someone more advanced in español please correct me? Gracias.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UnaGranSenora

Why was 'Mi abuelo se caer' wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joyrajd
joyrajd
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You must conjugate caer.

You may be confused because with a verb in reflexive form, such as caerse, you must not only use the correct reflexive pronoun to match the subject (since we're talking about "Mi abuelo" you have the correct one, "se") but also conjugate the verb to also match the subject ("cayó", which is past tense for "he fell", rather than "caer", which just means "to fall").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cap.picard

Hopefully, she survives!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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He survives. (abuelo)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KacperGilewicz
KacperGilewicz
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Can it be used in context of 'failing in love'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Espeonage24

Don't know. I'm working on the flirting course..... didn't say anything about that there....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickm712

Would it be possible to say here "Mi abuelo se ha caído"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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"Mi abuelo se ha caído" is "My grandfather has fallen," not "My grandfather fell."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfalkensteinfcs

why would you do that to your grandfather

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfalkensteinfcs

jerks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T0L4
T0L4
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I was so happy i got the "se cayo" right. And got it wrong at "mi abo". Always thought that was an acceptable way to say it..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1lovewwjd

From reading other post, "se" is like saying "he" fell. Mi abuelo, (he) se cayo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kawaii_Putato

Is grandpa ok?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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It corrected Abuelo to abuelito?

1 year ago