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  5. "Hun må til byen for å danse."

"Hun til byen for å danse."

Translation:She has to go to the city to dance.

November 20, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guiaugusto91

When can I omit the verb "gå"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

you can omit the verb if you don't need to specify how you're getting there. If you use then you are specifically walking, not going. In this sense is a bit of a false friend for English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

Kan man bruker "drar" i stedet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

you could also say hun må dra til byen for å danse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evan.S47

But we see quite a few examples here in Duo where "gå" is used as "going", but is obvious it is not referring to walking...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

You can say: "Hun må gå til byen for å danse." However, she is not walking, she takes her car, or the bus.

I say: "Jeg har feber. Jeg må gå til legen." (I have a fever. I have to go to the doctor.)

I am not saying: "I have a fever. I have to walk to the doctor."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

but in the same series of exercise, we have a phrase "Månen går rundt jorda."

Is the moon walking around the earth?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phuongvu28

Can we say "Hun må til byen å danse" instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

no. If you want to say "to" in the sense of "in order to" then å by itself is not enough.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

If it interests anyone: this usage was common in English in, say, Shakespearean times, and is revived by Tolkien when he wants to sound archaic or timeless, e.g., in the Hobbit song " I must away e'er break of day".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

Usually it does, but here it means "before".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El_Calloxoen

That should be "ere," which means "before." "E'er" is always a contraction of "ever"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Belesdan

Maybe Tolkien spoke German (wasn´t he a language ptrofessor?), because we do it the same way ("sie muss in die Stadt zum Tanzen", no go).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

He wasn't a language professor in the ordinary sense : he taught Philology and Course 1 of the Oxford degree in English Language and Literature (which he largely created),which specialises in Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and other old or Mediaeval languages (including Old Norse, Mediaeval Welsh, etc )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trolljegeren

What's the difference between 'Hun må til byen for å danse' and 'Hun må til byen til å danse'? Is the second sentence allowed?

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