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  5. "Сестра готовит суп и рис."

"Сестра готовит суп и рис."

Translation:My sister is cooking soup and rice.

November 20, 2015

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirTobyBelch

Why is there no моя before сестра?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosfet07

We often omit the possessive pronouns with family nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eblazing

So depending on the context, this sentence could mean "your sister", "our sister", etc? Should "the sister" be accepted too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosfet07

Yes, it could, even "your":

Сын: Где суп?

Мать: Спроси у (своей) сестры.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Afor4
  • 1718

В данном случае совершенно не понятно, какая сестра готовит суп. Моя, твоя, наша или ваша, сестра милосердия, сестра со скорой помощи или одна из прихожанок в церкви - ведь тоже "сестра"... Без предшествующего контекста должен быть неопределенный артикль.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

Yes, "Sister cooks ..." is also accepted.

This sounds fine in British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

"The sister" was accepted (6 December 2015).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deltaray3

Interesting. This kinda brings things full circle in understanding why Russian speakers or maybe Eastern Europeans omit the "my" when speaking about family members in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Les_Aspirinistes

A sister... is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daadaadaaren

can this mean ‘a sister’ too? does sister have the same religious connotation as in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorBeck6

Why isn't "a sister" correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

And - if "A sister" is wrong, then how is "A sister cooks" said in Russian (e.g., In this story, an uncle cleans, a father works, a sister cooks..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaKalior

Why don't we use accusative form of the objects? Супа и риса?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishana92

суп and рис are accusative forms. Feminine nouns ending in а or я have different endings (у or ю, as you said), but masculine have the same form as nominative if they refer to objects and inanimate things and genitive form if they refer to living, animate things. All other feminine and neuter also stay the same as nominative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

When someone uses the wrong ending - how difficult is it for Russian-speakers to understand what's being said? English is extremely flexible in that one can still be understood despite doing terrible mutilation to the language, and I'd think that Russian has some great degree of flexibility in it that way, especially since many vowels don't seem to be pronounced the way I was expecting them to be, under the general rules. I assume there are regional variations akin to the difference between being from the North and South of the USA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewMat85

Normally you will be understood, but sometimes different endings differ the meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishana92

What is the difference between готовить and приготовить?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

I'm guessing based on what appears to be a prefix при- (maybe) = English "pre-" that приготовить means to do everything you need to do to get things ready to cook (slicing and dicing, etc.), while готовить refers to both the entire process and to finishing the cooking process. In US commercial kitchens, people are assigned to "prep[aration] work" and then actual cooking, but the whole process is cooking. Seems logical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusT2

Given the lack of a pronoun, I shortened my translation to "Sis", as a mock name. That could, maybe, work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TGunk4yg

Где слово " моя"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarshalZhukov

Doesn't the work 'sestra' also mean nurse? I am confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baldgymnastnurse

In some languages a nurse is referred to as "sister", although the full word for nurse in Russian is медсестра (medsestra) and a male nurse is медбрат


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

Maybe the full word for nurse is medsestra, but my students (teens who are native speakers of Russian here in Kazakhstan) told me sestra was the word for nurse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabbo288474

Готовить means cooking or making


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Is готовить limited to food, or can it generally apply to making anything?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomytomiak

I would omit word "my" or add моя.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BananaFan1

Why "my Sister" there is no words like моиа and else


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshLuca1

There should be "my" before "sister"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rowdy_Wolf

I didn't use this one, but could 'The Sister' work? Like a Nun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grandma620693

There is no indication in the sentence that "My" is appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monica845117

Did not the "и" at first and was wondering what soup rice was


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefanJela

"The sister" is accepted 09 May 2020 year.

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