"Нет, я не смотрел этот фильм."

Translation:No, I have not watched this movie.

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dave.pretty
dave.pretty
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Shouldn't "I was not watching that film" be acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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This is the correct answer. I think this choice will be added soon. You may send a report next time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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My answer was, "no, I was not watching this movie" and it was not accepted. As I continue to be stumped by these past tense aspects - my answer should have been accepted, correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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Yes, your choice should be accepted. Report it next time you will come across this task.

"Нет, я не смотрел этот фильм" is a phrase that is generaly used for discrubing the fact that you did not watch a/the movie. But, this phrase is also used for a case when you want to say that you were not watching a/the movie.

If you want to use Perfective Tense, you can say "я не посмотрел этот фильм". It coincide with the English aspect then.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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Thank you - I appreciate your response. When using the Perfective in the negative, it is my understanding from this site that the indication of the Russian, я не посмотрел этот фильм is, I failed to watch this film as I was expected to have done.

Whereas, я не смотрел этот фильм more means that I have not watched (or did not watch, was not watching, had not watched, or any of the other ways that I may put it in past tense in English) this film - it simply did not happen, but it was not expected of me to have watched the film. Do I grasp this correctly?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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@Neon_Iceberg, thank you so much - I greatly appreciate your help on this and all the other discussion questions! :) I am beginning to understand perfective and imperfective, and I am no longer trying to correlate all my helping verbs (was watching, had watched, etc.) with the Russian aspect. Instead, this is all about nuances inherent within the words themselves - and nuances cannot be cleanly translated with a 1:1 correlation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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Yes, you are right, the perfective choice in Russian is a perfect one for a missed opportunity to watch a\the film.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julie114840

Can I correct your future tense? "Report it next time you come across this task", not, "...next time you will come across...". It's some type of future subjunctive I think, and so you don't need to put the future tense of "to be" in (ie, will). Future is implied by the use of "next time".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
Jenz114
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It could simply be because your answer didn't include "no".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meta7gear

Out of interest, why is the imperfective aspect used here instead of perfective? Would it be more natural to say Нет, я не посмотрел этот фильм?

Does the negative/positive nature of the sentence affect which aspect to use?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
Jenz114
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To me, смотрел emphasizes the act of simply having watched the movie, rather than the result. For example: Have you seen the new Star Wars? Нет, я не смотрел этот фильм. I didn't like the remake of Star Wars and prefer the originals. What's your opinion of the new one? (Here a result of having watched the film is expected) Я не посмотрел этот фильм. Generally speaking, this distinction is difficult to translate into languages without verb aspect and is made up for through context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/voevodsky

Perfective here refers to some time. To express the fact, that you know the film already, better use imperfective form. I'm a Russian native

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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From my Russian textbook: use imperfective to answer questions of the type "have you ever done this?" Both the question and the answer are imperfective.

I imagine, however, a conversation like this would work (grammatically, at least...): "Вы читал Войну и Мир?" "Да, я прочитал её вечера вечером!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci
Gwenci
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"Вы читали «Войну и мир»?" — "Да, я прочитал её вечера вечером!"

Yes, it’s okay (at least if you really meant that the second person read the whole book in one evening :D)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatYates1

I also answered "No, I was not was not looking at (watching) that film" imperfective continuous action or imprecise. "I have not seen that film" is surely precise. In English they seem to be completely different constructs? Grateful for any help?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dogdogcat

I think that "looking at" is different than "watching." Generally you look at something briefly, like a photo, or it could be an animal or person for just for a bit. However watching implies more involvement - you watch a movie, watch birds (if you study bird movements and habits) . If you are watching a person you might be spying on them, or making sure they don't steal something - you are watching their activity.

I answered "No, I haven't seen that film." and it was approved.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatYates1

Yes I think you are right but in Russian it would seem they do not differentiate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dogdogcat

We are supposed to answer in ways we would say it in English. I understand what you mean about look/watch=смотреть, but I think we have to take it a step further and make it sound natural in our language as well. I have found that out multiple times (eg, for как вас завут, " How do they call you" and variants thereof are not accepted.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatYates1

Yes you are right but just lately I seem to have been spending more and more time on the English translation especially where we have differences between English and American. The problem is how imaginative these translations are putting in all manner of words which are not at all mentioned in the sentence to be translated and sometimes my imagination is severely limited. For example "It will take a long time to explain" for "это долго объяснять" I got this right but thought I was running the risk of being marked wrong so very hesitant. I too had a sentence rejected the other day where I translated something like "What is your new teacher called?" I tend now unless I feel particularly indignant to move on unless discussion might be useful and would really like there to be more translation from English into Russian this is because I find it easier to translate from Russian into English because the constructions are all there and I have this passive knowledge my problem is activating it! The one thing I'll say is that I wonder sometimes whether I will ever manage to speak Russian but it will have been a whole lot of fun trying and hugely interesting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dogdogcat

Oh, Pat, it is not just you. Lately I have been putting less thought into devising my answers, suffering through some being wrong, and just trying to remember their translation for later. I understand that they really can't cover all the myriad ways there are to express the same idea. And you don't want to expend a lot of energy on worrying - that deer in the headlights feeling - it's a waste! Just know that some of your answers will be right even though they are not counted as such.

I too suffer from feelings of being overwhelmed. Sometimes I walk around with all these Russian words going through my head that maybe I can't quite remember what they mean or that I can't use in a sentence. But I try not to let it get me (too) down, and keep plugging away. It is not easy, but if we work at it we will keep getting better.

Have faith in yourself sounds banal, but having it will save you lots of time and energy from being self-critical and worried.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/voevodsky

Appreciate your efforts! By the way, your translation (Это) долго объяснять is OK, can be used in informal or semi-formal cases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/voevodsky

Good luck with your efforts!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Is that perf. or imp.?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmatnazarov
khmatnazarov
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'No, I didn't watch the film' was rejected.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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If there's an "этот" in this course, you should put "this" or "that." ("этот" is used in the English from Russian course to give an idea of definite articles, but that pedagogical priority obviously doesn't apply the other way around)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rwhaller42

Is there any reason why "фильм" is often translated as "movie" instead of "film"? In English, I will admit that if we are coming out of a theater we are more likely to use the word "movie" when discussing what we have just seen and "film" can be a verb and would be used to say "I should have used a better camera to film that movie."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_Russian

I don't know what your geographical background is but I think they're just defaulting to American English most of the time and in America "movie" is the more common word whereas in the UK "film" is widely used. (If I hear "film" I almost think of a thin surface layer (if that description makes any sense) more readily.) I believe they do accept "film" as a translation if someone uses it in a translation, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ramin1981
ramin1981
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"No I did not see this film" - is also correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEnglishAugust
TheEnglishAugust
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I expected this to be a Perfective, and really surprised to learn that it is an Imperfective verb. Is it because of the negative ? If aspect is used to indicate whether an action is completed or not, and if the example here is that the narrator has NOT (yet) watched the movie, then it is an incomplete action. (Maybe I am overthinking this.) Probably I just need to learn the examples by heart and move on.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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The non-native ever treads with trepidation in the realm of aspect, but I do think that is why imperfective is used to translate negative present perfect sentences.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iwa540485
Iwa540485
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Never?

9 months ago
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