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https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania

Stupid question: Glas and glasra

RejistaniaPlus
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I knew glasra for vegetables, and now I encountered glas for green. So I wondered how these words are related. Is there a productive or fossilized derivation form?

2
2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMTO
AndrewMTO
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The singular of glasraí is glasra. It comes from glasrad, Old Irish glas (green) + rad (a collective suffix that when attached to an adjective, forms a noun)

4
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania
RejistaniaPlus
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Thanks!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Italian and Spanish use verdura for "vegetables", Danish uses grøntsager.

Even English has "greens".

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rejistania
RejistaniaPlus
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Yep, and German has Grünzeug which is similar but kinda facetious. It would make sense if they were derived.

I just wondered if the derivation was actually there or these words stem from different etymologies (because I learned not to trust Irish on many things ;) ) and if they are derivatives whether -ra is a derivation form which is regularly used.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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Polish has warzywo, pl. warzywa which means something like ‘cookables’, but it also has a word zielenina (mainly in singular, rarely pl. zieleniny) which is something like ‘greens’, ‘greeny’ and is a little less literary and more colloquial term for (mainly green) vegetables.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s not a stupid question.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

Although etymological questions may often receive foolish answers, they are never stupid questions.

For what it's worth, eDIL (The Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language) has an entry for glas "of green or greenish hue (esp. of growing things, grass, trees)" but not for glasra. I don't have access to the Royal Irish Academy's Corpas na Gaeilge 1600-1882 so I can't tell when glasra was first used.

My suspicion, and it is no more than that, is that glasra is directly derived from glas (I don't know how common -ra is in derived forms) and that both go back to Proto-Celtic *glasto- (See the University of Wales Celtic Lexicon here)

Irish really needs an etymological dictionary. I truly hope the Foclóir na Nua-Ghaeilge project will include thorough etymologies.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Wiktionary is generally pretty good about etymology. In fact, it does cover glasra's etymology on it. Also, if you know enough about the similarities between Scots Gaelic and Irish, you can use McBain's Etymological Dictionary of Gaelic.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

Wiktionary is often excellent. But given my limited knowledge of Celtic philology and Wiktionary's user-generated content I am sometimes reluctant to immediately cite it. There are times when I lust after Ranko Matasović's Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden: Brill, 2009) but with a €190 price tag I doubt I'll own a copy any time soon.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The eDIL shows that one of the former meanings of lus was “vegetable”, so it seems as though glasra is a relatively modern word. Dinneen only listed the plural {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}glasraiḋ (now glasraí ).

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Reply2 years ago