"У тебя есть телефон?"

Translation:Do you have a phone?

November 22, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yotampaz

Why is it тебя? Shouldn't it be ты or вы?

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RiccieliMI

I also didn't understand

May 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DrSwordopolis

Would this also be "Do you have a phone number"?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

Yes, it is one of the possible interpretations. Naturally, it is not as likely these days when mobiles are so widespread.

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DrSwordopolis

Thanks for the super quick reply. Enjoying the course so far!

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/michaeljcosand

A very useful sentence when traveling to Russia from another country :D

January 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ecd92

Doesn't ест also mean eats/eat/eating?

August 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

ест indeed is "eats" or "is eating". Есть, however, is the infinitive—and there is another есть, which is the only surviving present tense form of "to be".

August 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ThiaLuvsMUSTANG

In English, telephone could be shortened just to phone, could this work here (in Russian) too? спасибо!!!!!

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

Nope. Фон means "background". It is also a linguistic term unknown by most native speakers.

Since you, probably, did not know that meaning of "phone" in English, I think it is safe to assume you won't need it in Russian. "Background" is useful, though—just not in the historical sense. It is more like a literal background or something that figuratively serves as a background against which something else happens.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ThiaLuvsMUSTANG

WOW your fast!!!!!! спасибо!!!!!!!! THIS HELPS :P

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Barefoppy

When I answered in English, "phone" is accepted as a translation of телефон, but I guess it isn't reciprocal.

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/hotrodngold

So, if I were to ask if someone had a phone in AE, most people would assume/know I was asking about a landline telephone. Where as if I needed to ask if someone had a mobile phone, I'd use the word "cell", or (in some dialects) a "mobile".

What, if any, correlation exists in Russian? If I ask for a телефон, would I be directed to the nearest landline?

Спасибо!

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolm7777777

TO YOU EXISTS PHONE?

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MollyEllio

If this is asking about A (general) telephone, how would you ask "do you have THE (specific) telephone?" Is there a difference or is it context reliant??

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/j0ester

У тебя есть это телефон, perhaps?

Edit: Definitely wrong. It would have to be "этот телефон" if anything, but that would mean "THIS telephone".

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ty-mister2

What's the spellinf of both do you have and i have? I'm getting the two mixed up

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/thenobearddude

How do we say mobile or cellphone in russian?

June 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Al_Atro

Well, there such words as "мобильный телефон" and "сотовый телефон". Some people even use the word "мобильник". But mostly people just say "телефон".

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/j0ester

I've seen the word мобильный used.

June 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Al_Atro

Yes, but it is an adjective, so you wouldn't use it without a noun.

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

You would.

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Al_Atro

Well, it sounds really strange though. It's better to use the word "мобильник" then.

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/xmatnazarov

"Do you have a mobile?" should be accepted I guess

February 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/johonimora

Is it necessary to say phone instead of telephone ?

December 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nikkoara

Does anybody know that is the accepted romanization of есть?!

June 25, 2019
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