"Tourismus ist wichtig."

Translation:Tourism is important.

November 22, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

How would one say, "Tourism is important for the country's economy." "Tourismus ist wichtig für die Wirtschaft des Landes."?

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sounds good to me.

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraAnimalgirl

So how would you say 'i am a tourist' ?

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"Ich bin ein Tourist."

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraAnimalgirl

okay, thanks.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/march_happy

Significant=important. Am I right, Huh?

August 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldMate2

Similar but not exactly interchangeable.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VuxTebralone

Why not "Der Tourismus ist wichtig"?

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sebastien561961

What does the us at the end of tourismus convey?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

"- ism

Ultimately from either Ancient Greek -ισμός ‎(-ismós), a suffix that forms abstract nouns of action, state, condition, doctrine; from stem of verbs in -ίζειν ‎(-ízein) (whence English -ize), or from the related suffix Ancient Greek -ισμα ‎(-isma), which more specifically expressed a finished act or thing done.

Many English nouns in -ism are loans of Greek nouns in -ισμός (mostly via Latin and French), such as baptism from βαπτισμός (loaned from Old French ca. 1300), or Judaism from Ἰουδαισμός (a learned English formation based on Latin, coined ca. 1500). In Late Latin, the -ismus suffix became the ordinary ending for names of religions and ecclesiastical or philosophical systems or schools of thought, thus chrīstiānismus (whence 16th c. Christianism) in Tertullian, a trend continued in Medieval Latin, with e.g. pāgānismus attested by the 8th century. From the 16th century, such formations became very common in English, until the early 18th century mostly restricted to either root words of Greek or Latin origin (heroism, patriotism) or proper names (Calvinism, Lutheranism). Productivity from root words with evidently non-Latin and non-Greek origin dates to the late 18th century (e.g. blackguardism). Reflecting this productivity, use of ism as a standalone noun is attested by Edward Pettit (1680) and becomes common from the mid 18th century. The narrowed sense of forming terms for ideologies based on the belief of superiority is a "draft addition" submitted to OED in 2004, based on coinages such as racism (1932) or sexism (1936) and productive since the 1970s."

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-ism#English

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

How did Greek words end up in German?

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

(mostly via Latin and French)

For example, through religion (Roman Catholic Church and Latin).

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What does the "m" at the end of "tourism" convey? Nothing, by itself.

It's just that the ending is -ism in English and -ismus in German (and -isme in French, etc. etc.).

It was -ismos in Greek, as Christian pointed out, becoming -ismus in Latin. German kept the Latin form while French wore down the ending as it did with other -us endings in words it inherited from Latin, then English got the ending from French and wore it down even further.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Farzaneh316123

Hi What's the definite article of,,Tourism,,I Think ,,Der,

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Tourism is not a German word, but Tourismus is indeed masculine: der Tourismus.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Farzaneh316123

Hello Dear Mizinamo/The Greek(Tomus)and Latin roots mean a turnaround and the term(Tourist)is from the 19th century/In Iran is called travelling over the world(صنعت گردشگري و جهانگردي)Thanks

July 12, 2017
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