"Весна пришла!"

Translation:Spring has come!

November 22, 2015

40 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaStyIes

The Frank Sinatra lover in me is disappointed that "Spring has sprung!" is not accepted, but I just had to try it :p

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqCVMCD72b0

(first few seconds)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerysGhemor

I was sorely tempted to do the same thing, but just barely restrained myself. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sskroh

Yeah, I tried it. No dice. I was bummed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dedpan
  • 2000

I does raise the question - are there similar alliterative idioms in Russian for any of the seasons?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

If it existed, it would be something like "Лето прилетело.".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etherial82

couldn't Vesna be a girl's name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenSurvivor

With modern parents it probably could. But it is not known as a name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etherial82

Pretty common in south-slavic languages...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

I knew you were a Serb (or something along those lines) as soon as you've asked that question :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/el-montunero

Yes, I also wrote "Vesna came" :) Very popular name in Croatia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thequeerqueen

So you can turn common nouns into names in Russia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

Not really. If it's Slavic name, noun has to be something bit more "epic", and based on words such as Love,God,World, Rule-over-other-people . For example, Vladimir means "Peaceful ruler" or "Rules in peace" or even "Ruler of the World"
Many names are also Greek and Latin-based.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thequeerqueen

I'm not talking about etymology of already existing names - names that have been historically established as names - but about parents being like "Oh, our daughter was born in spring, let's name her >Весна<", "Oh, isn't our child a ray os sunshine!, so why not give the name Sun!", while there has been no instances of these things being used as names, historically. Basically, I was wondering if parents, instead of choosing an already existing name, are allowed to come up with a name on their own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

Well, it's not forbidden by law, if that's what you mean, but it's a rather uncommon occurrence. Most people choose one of the existing names.

I believe the authorities can refuse to register some insanely weird name (like an unpronounceable cluster of letters), but something like "Весна" shouldn't be too much of a problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonapard

What about common names Вера, Надежда,Любовь?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenSurvivor

No, that was a joke :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thequeerqueen

I thought as much. But seeing as I know nothing about naming children in Russia and having heard all those crazy names Americans come up with and are allowed to have, I really didn't know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenSurvivor

Oh well, that's exactly what I was talking about, it's the same in Russia, some parents invent names for their children and yeah, they can take a word like Весна and use it as a name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

I know a Serbian woman named Весна (pronounced вэ́с-на)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldBoyan

it's a common female name in Serbia, so common that I made a mistake and translated this sentence as "Vesna came" :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagnetcParticls

Reminds me of Princess Vespa in "Space Balls."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsiehler

This reminds me of a poem I once memorized; the second stanza is: ...они гласят во все концы: "Весна идёт, весна идёт, Мы молодой весны гонцы, Она нас выслала вперёд!

It's a fairly mediocre poem. Heaven knows why I still remember it so many years later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouryuu

I thought they meant Vesna as in a female name and was like ❤❤❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Весна је име на српском језику. (Вэсна это имя на сербском языке.) Vesna is a name in Serbian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouryuu

Znam, nego sam mislila da je i rusko ime... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Also, it's /vʲɪs-'NA/ in Russian, but /'VƐS-nɐ/ in Serbian. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donald135335

I can't believe that it accepts : Spring has sprung


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xeniolum

Spring is here, spring is heeere :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

Yay! Someone else thought of Tom Lehrer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4
  • 1342

Life is skittles and life is beer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

This is a truly depressing thought where I'm from, so no exclamation point for me. Spring's arrival means it's quickly followed by 7 months of brutal summer. (Actually we really only have two seasons, Summer and Not-Summer.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimnice

Sounds like Arizona


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

This is a depressing sentence for me too, but for a different reason. It's -30°C today and spring is still 3 - 5 months away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickCostley

Next? "Winter is coming."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Isn't summer after spring? Наступает лето.
But if it's winter, then

Наступает зима.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evgeny040187

...and rays of warm look in my window


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/palmik235

if you said 'spring had come and the weather was warmer' how would it be written?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Весна пришла и погода была теплее.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannuKoson

Наступила весна.

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