"Мне надо лечь спать в девять."

Translation:I need to go to bed at nine.

November 23, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrewr756

"I need to go to sleep at nine" was not accepted. Maybe there is some reason why this is wrong but I thought "спать" translated more directly as "sleep" than "bed".

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dchekhov

Native speaker sitting next to me insisting that "go to sleep" is correct

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

I think it should be accepted. "Go to bed" means the same than "go to sleep", and in this case it literally correlates to спать.

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerysGhemor

Hahahaha, so not going to happen. ;-)

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flootzavut

I'd go to bed at nine if there was any chance I'd get to sleep.

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/an_alias

It doesn't specify morning or night, you know...

(At least to my US brain)

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex_Kinsey

To my British brain it would mean 9 p.m. unless specified otherwise

June 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mallowigi

лечь = to lie down, perfective лежать = to lie down, imperfective ?

July 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewMat85

Лежать is not 'to lie down', it's 'to lie'

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a22brad22

So it describes the resultant state of having lied down? Just clarifying.

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

"I need to lie down to sleep at nine."

Again, I may be translating too literally...

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Y.V.Smith

One can go to bed without going to sleep, so I can see why they've may have marked it wrong for those who added sleeping to the mix.

May 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewMat85

Russian sentence HAS 'спать', thus it refers to sleeping

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hugh.W

Can anyone explain what's going on grammatically with лечь спать? It seems to be two infinitives in a row, which we haven't seen in any previous exercise. Can you generally in Russian combine two verbs in this way? How would I look this up in a dictionary?

July 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xO.Lx

I need to go bed at nine, is it right?

February 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rednaxela4

What is the difference between ложиться спать and лечь спать?

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoenOskam

I thought that after надо there should be a noun and after нужно a verb?

June 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Traci409317

It's the other way around.

August 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

You can also use "нужно" with verbs, but "надо" is exclusively paired with verbs.

August 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bottss1

What is the difference between лечь спать and лечь поспать?

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vik84w

"Лечь спать" is just to go to bed. "Лечь поспать" has a slightly different meaning. I'd say it's like english "to take a nap" and conveys the meaning of being asleep for a while.

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElderRober18

imperfective and perfective versions of to sleep

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard547513

So does я иду в кровать just mean "I go towards the bed" with no meaning of getting into it and sleeping? Is that why лечь спать is used?

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

Basically. In English, when you say “go to bed”, it definitely implies that you are going to get into a bed (or really any other sleeping vessel, haha) and go to sleep for a while. In Russian, I don’t believe this is the case. «Иду ко кровати» (which would be the correct translation of “go towards the bed”, I believe) simply doesn’t have the same meaning, whereas «лечь спать» does.

November 26, 2017
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