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"Ce cuisinier est un phénomène !"

Translation:That cook is a phenomenon!

0
4 years ago

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amckel
amckel
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you can't give options, i.e. CHEF as a translation for CUISINIER and then not accept it!

97
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mme-Sandoz

Having worked in the industry for some decades I can say that the term chef is frequently misused to mean cook. French titles are still used in native English speaking kitchens so correctly chef means the top position of the kitchen and everyone else is a cook. That being said it is valid to argue that chef has become synonymous with cook in common parlance.

47
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura383078

I thought we say 'head chef' for the top position and then use other French-origin terms for the other cooks like 'sous-chef', 'saucier' and the more anglicised 'pastry chef' etc. We say 'the knives don't belong to the kitchen, they belong to the chef' - and everybody in the kitchen has their own knives. I always just assumed everyone that cooked in a professional kitchen was a chef. Maybe I'm wrong.

I have been careful to use 'cook' for 'chef' and 'driver' for 'chauffeur' just so duo will know I understand what the word means.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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"Head chef" is redundant unless there are multiple chefs above the sous-chef, which isn't common. Sous-chef literally means "under-chief" or "under-leader", so it's the second in command to the chef. No, not everyone who cooks professionally is a chef -- most of them are just "cooks"! This is an enormously misused word in the English-speaking world.

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura383078

The original comment, I thought was a good point - "That chef is a phenomenon", would be understood by any English speaking person to mean "that cook" :) we have differentiated our use from the French. We don't use the word sous-chef for the second in command on a building site, or anywhere other than a kitchen. Nor do we use the word chef for anyone outside of a kitchen... and because we call so many people in the kitchen a 'chef' in one form or another, we also need the title 'head chef' - I don't know if this is different in the US or not. In England, Gordon Ramsay for example, has been a "head chef". I understand this is not in keeping with the original French meaning, but... we like to adopt to words and play with them and make them ours.

11
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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That's very true that the English language has adopted words like "chef" in a way that is removed from the French meaning, so "That chef is a phenomenon" should be an acceptable translation. I still believe it's helpful to inform people of the difference in the original language so they can decide how to use the word. I'm a purist, so I'd prefer to use "chef (de cuisine)" the way the French would, and I know there are many others out there like me.

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomHilton1
TomHilton1
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Absolutely. In English, "chef" is certainly correct in this context.

27
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timomcf
timomcf
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I think that chef implies an overall boss (though it could be the boss of the kitchen) whereas cuisinier implies a cook.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Yes. The word we use in English as 'chef' is short for 'chef de cuisine'. The drop down options are not always the most appropriate for the sentence. Computers are not that smart when it comes to language.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmpalmer
jmpalmer
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No one EVER uses "chef de cuisine" in English. The standard word for a person who cooks professionally is chef; it should certainly be accepted.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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IMO:

  • cuisinier <-> cook
  • chef, chef cuisinier <-> chef
7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoldenDusty

If you work in the industry you never call a cook "chef". "Chef de cuisine" is just the more formal for chef. A cook generally does not go to culinary school or is still "green" while a "chef" has years of training and experience and leads the kitchen.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4u1e
4u1e
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Perhaps, but you're talking about 'mistakes' in English - a difference between technical and popular usage is not necessarily a mistake - and we're not primarily here to correct those, but instead to learn French.

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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No, ONE OF the standard words for a person who cooks professionally is "chef," and it is not the best choice when the French word is "cuisinier."

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

It's not a question of whether it's the best choice, it's whether it's good enough to be considered a correct translation, the measure of which is whether a native speaker would be likely to say it. Which they would.

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuzzy255433

They do in many restaurants.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timomcf
timomcf
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My bigger question is whether the word phénomène has the same context that it has in english. When they write character, we interpret it as "somewhat quirky person" whereas it seems like their context is more like a sort of wunderkind.

Anyone native speakers have insight into this?

43
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talbois

I am an English speaker and we would normally say "that cook is phenomenal", not "that cook is a phenomenon", which I have NEVER heard used in this way.

24
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam320095
Sam320095
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agreed! "That cook is a phenomenon" sounds very odd.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillKresowaty

Yes. I was going to say the same thing. It is not normal English to say this cook is a phenomenon (in which case this cook is odd or bizarre) when the intent is to say that this cook is very good, therefore, phenomenal.

2
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shotz87
shotz87
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I'm wondering the same thing

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
antlane
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Larousse:phénomène = prodige = prodigy, wonder// (familier) =excentrique = character (un drôle de phénomène = an odd customer)

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kminsinger
kminsinger
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As a native speaker of American English, saying "That chef is a phenomena!" would imply that he/she is unexpectedly popular, like a cultural phenomena.

If you wanted to say that the chef is extremely good, or excellent without the normally expected training, you would say "That chef is a prodigy!" As talbois said, you could say "that chef is phenomenal!"

A subtle difference for sure, but one that also changing the meaning of the phrase from being surprised by their popularity to being pleased with their skill.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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"Phenomena" is plural for "phenomenon". No one can be "a phenomena".

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuzzy255433

Alas too many english speakers use non standard plurals as if they were singular.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgannie
Morgannie
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I would use phenomenon to mean something or someone exceptional although a more colloquial use could easily be someone who is a bit wierd and wonderful!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan36330
Susan36330
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I would say the cook is a phenom or the cook is phenomenal. The noun form (phenom) means he/she stands out from other cooks and is exceptional - implied emphasis on comparison to other cooks. The adjective form means he/she cooks really well, with implied emphasis on great food. There might be a dozen phenomenal cooks around (or none), but that is not a concern - this one is phenomenal too.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinDietr
RobinDietr
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So "être un phénomène" only means "being excentric/quirky/peculiar" and never "being phenomenal/exceptional"?

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thalass

I tried "Phenomenal" and was marked wrong. :/

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuchesezik

Should be accepted as it is a more natural phrasal translation, after all, we are translating phrases and not word for word.

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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It's always tricky replacing a noun with an adjective.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrchidBlack
OrchidBlack
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"That cook is a phenomenon" was accepted for me.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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It accepted "This cook is a phenomenon!" but, after seeing the suggested translation, I really don't think that's a particularly appropriate translation

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Based on Reverso, the most common use of "un phénomène" (noun) is "a phenomenon". http://context.reverso.net/traduction/francais-anglais/ph%C3%A9nom%C3%A8ne

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature

Would phénomène really be used to mean character in the context of the given sentence? If you say that the cook is a phenomenon it implies he is a fantastic cook. If you say he's a character it just implies that he's a bit odd. Given the word choice I would expect the former definition to be the better translation, but the latter is the suggested translation.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
Konrad-Michal
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Pas de liaison entre est et un?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536

Yes, there is a liaison; I clearly hear ee-ah ; )

-3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
Konrad-Michal
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I wonder if they can fix it.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeblancHer
LeblancHer
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I have noticed lots of problems of liaison but never got an answer

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536

No, I don't think there is anything that needs to be fixed here. Duo's pronunciation of 'est un' [as 'ee-ah'] sounds correct as is. The liaison is already there and, even at normal speed, quite easy to hear.

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
Konrad-Michal
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I thought that "t" should be pronounced: est un

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
Konrad-Michal
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That's exactly what I meant. The liaison is the pronunciation of a word-final consonant due to a following vowel sound in French, so the way the owl says this sentence (ɛ - œ̃) is not a liaison.

4
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536

OK, clearly my current understanding of 'liaison' isn't up to scratch. ; ) So for the time being I think it better to rely on the phonetic transcription of 'ce cuisinier est un phénomène', as 'sə kɥizinje ɛt- œ̃ fenɔmɛn', which serves to confirm what you said about the sounded -t. Should you want to check it out for yourself, go to: http://easypronunciation.com/en/french-phonetic-transcription-converter#result [Edited on 11 Feb. '15]

3
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanrmiller

This cook is a phenom was marked wrong... phenom is used to describe people in English all the time.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Maybe as slang. But I'm pretty sure that 'phenom' isn't in a standard dictionary and there isn't enough space in the answers database for all the different slang to have been included even if it were appropriate.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanrmiller

Looked it up in a few dictionaries and sure enough, it was marked as informal or slang. It's a common word in sports or competitions, but if it's slang, then you're right, Duo can't be expected to cover that. Here I am learning more about English as I attempt to learn French! :)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liliumpardalinum

Yes. Used in sports and abbreviated as phenom, pronounced phee'-nom. But I dare say if I put phenom here it would be marked incorrect.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaybekwa

Je ne comprends pas ce que «character» veux dire dans ce phrase. En anglais, Je l'utilise pour une personnage fictive.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeblancHer
LeblancHer
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Ça veut aussi tempérament

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SagarApshankar

Wouldn't "this Cook is phenomenal" be a better translation?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David505111

What is wrong with "This cook is a phenonemon" ?, DL said correct solutions were - • This cook is a freak! • That cook is a phenomenon!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Apart from that's not the way you spell phenomenon?

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarksAaron
MarksAaronPlus
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I'd like to know when this sentence could mean "This chef/cook is a freak!" and if "phénomène" in this context can have the sexual connotation in French that "freak" sometimes has in English ;)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Really to be used as "freak", it would be "un phénomène de foire" (i.e., a sideshow freak). http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/ph%c3%a9nom%c3%a8ne/59831

1
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarksAaron
MarksAaronPlus
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Merci!

0
Reply1 year ago