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  5. "Carolina vai à academia."

"Carolina vai à academia."

Translation:Carolina goes to the gym.

November 24, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kadara_gata

yep, keep throwin' them curveballs, portuguese..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kadara_gata

also, what's the difference betwen "vai a", and "vai para a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Vai a/ao = grammatically correct.

Vai para a/o = used in day-to-day conversations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Why do you say "vai para" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

As for this context, "ir para" would not apply (up to now).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I see... :)


With some twists, we could find a way :p

  • Carolina gives up her job as a school trainer and her students ask each other: "where is she going now"?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.wilkinson168

Languages are endlessly fascinating in how one 'false friend' in one language can be the opposite in another!

In German, "Gymnasium" is an academically ambitious high school (one could perhaps even an academy in US English) while in Portuguese an 'academia' means a gymnasium!

Maybe that's a good trick for remembering this one :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I wonder if they all came from the same origin, in a time where perhaps sports and studies were all together?

In Portuguese:

  • Academia = A workout gym
  • Academia = Academy (less often) - Related to academic/scholar issues
  • Ginásio = A closed building containing sports courts inside
  • Ginásio = High school

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigglesworth

They do - they all come from the Greek practice of providing instruction in exercise facilities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

As far as I understand, in Portugal they use "ginásio" for a gym, instead of "academia".

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