"The count does not walk with the king."

Translation:O conde não caminha com o rei.

January 9, 2013

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisRosenbaum

Can anyone clarify the difference between caminhar and andar?

June 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruno_Henrique0

In this case, ''andar/caminhar com o rei'' It's the same thing, but in others contexts have differences. I will to try show you the difference of this words.

''Andar'' is what we do every day. We walk (andamos) to go to market, for example.

''Caminhar'' is an exercise. ''Caminhar'' is to walk for a long time, not to arrive in a certain place, but for example, for health reasons.

If you to write on the google the word ''caminhar'', will appear many health sites.


Neste caso, ''andar/caminhar com o rei'' é a mesma coisa, mas em outros contextos têm diferenças. Eu vou tentar te mostrar a diferença destas palavras.

Andar é o que fazemos todo dia. Nós andamos para ir ao mercado, por exemplo.

Caminhar é praticar uma atividade. Caminhar é você andar por um bom tempo, não para chegar em um determinado lugar, mas por exemplo, por motivos de saúde.

Se você colocar no google a palavra ''caminhar'', vai aparecer vários sites de saúde.


I am a native brazilian portuguese speaker, so probably I've made many mistakes in my text in english. This is the reason why I also wrote my text in portuguese.

One question. In this case, is it ''I've made'' or ''I made'' ???

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sharkbbb

Wow, I perfectly understood the whole of your Portuguese text, except for saúde. Thanks Duo and thank you all native speakers and non-native speakers, who comment and help us a lot ;)

Let me try to edit your English:

In this case, ''andar/caminhar com o rei'' are the same [thing] (or "is the same [thing] as «something»), but in others contexts they have differences. I will to try show you the difference(s) between these words.

''Andar'' is what we do every day. We walk (andamos) to go to the market, for example.

''Caminhar'' is an exercise. ''Caminhar'' is to walk for a long time, not to arrive at a certain place, but for example, for health reasons.

If you are to write (or just "you write") in google ("on" should be fine too, but not "the google", unless it's an adjective as in "the google search") the word ''caminhar'', many health sites will appear.

If you mean a specific time, you should use past simple, but if you mean general action with a result valid at present moment you should use present perfect:

  • I've made many mistakes (general, present perfect)
  • I made many mistakes, when I wrote this (specific, past simple)

Also note that adverbs (probably) usually go after the subject (I) and auxiliary verb (have), but before the main verb (made):

  • I've probably made
  • I probably made
February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/shirisha

what's the meaning of this sentence?

January 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/TiagoMoita_PT

What do you mean? Which part does it sound questionable?

January 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/shirisha

I thought maybe it's some known phrase?...

January 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/TiagoMoita_PT

Like an idiomatic expression? I'm pretty sure it isn't, never heard of it.

January 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

I do not think that an earl (conde) is a count (conde)

April 22, 2014
Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.