"Piloten har hoppet fra flyet."

Translation:The pilot has jumped from the airplane.

November 26, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ambrose_Burnside

A fantastic example of when this sentence is very GOOD news to hear: www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqPPCCKAFp8

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisamyrland

That's never a good sign.... :/

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ythinn

The pilot may have done so after successfully landing the plane, rushing towards his wife and kids smiling and waving at him from outside the landing strip.

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

How do you know it's a he?

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ythinn

It was a hunch. One of the many distinct hunches that male pilots exhibit when rushing towards their wives. ;p

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanBabcock

Male pilots aren't the only pilots who can have wives.

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/algomyst

For what it's worth, "he" is often used as a gender neutral pronoun in English, especially colloquially. It is actually only a very recent development in English for it no longer to be recognised as gender-neutral in formal text.

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corvinr

That has some historical truth, but it is now generally unacceptable as a gender neutral pronoun and to persist in advocating it is essentially picking a fight for no real principle at all, except perhaps defense of traditional sexism.

It is also true that for centuries (at least since Chaucer) "they" has been used to refer to an unspecified singular referent. So we have en economical, ready made solution within the language. Increasingly, this sensible position is prevailing over cumbersome "he or she", "s/he", etc., as we cast off the last of the false notions prescribed to us by vain 19th century grammarians who basically made a lot of s*** up. (Grammatically plural pronouns can't have singular referents? Then we better revert to the use of "thou", I suppose, since "you" is a grammatically singular pronoun used for singular referents.)

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ythinn

Might I humbly suggest (I guess it wasn't quite apparent from my playful mockery of Luke's comment) that I'm the best person to know the sex of the characters in my own story? Would it then be reasonable to point out that to suggest otherwise is to be picking a fight in the first place?

So unless anyone is willing to argue that writing a story about a male pilot is somehow sexist - I propose we wrap this up. Everything else is quite irrelevant.

Thank you.

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gzeebzee

And I was imagining that the pilot were female as logically she wore a jumpsuit, such attire not commonly available in the english speaking world for men... Only to then find that the Norwegian litteral translation of jumpsuit "hoppdress" is not the chic Bond girl outfit but ski jumping attire. Obviously! Now I must not think of Bond girls but Eddie the Eagle Edwards.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/starfy420

Fy faen, vi skal dø

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judegrindv

Does anybody know why 'has been jumping' isn't accepted? One of the things I'm struggling to understand with the lack of non-progressive verbs is distinguishing things that could recur more than once. Silly question, but how do we distinguish in this particular instance that the pilot doesn't jump from the plane every time rather than only once?

March 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardwestsoley

Herregud!

June 5, 2019
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