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  5. "У меня болит живот."

"У меня болит живот."

Translation:I have a stomachache.

November 26, 2015

98 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angamar

wow, in Serbian, живот means life... stomach is стомак


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouryuu

I just immediately translated the sentence as "My life hurts" in my head lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/park.sun

yeah i thought "it hurts to live" lel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

I'm not sure it's complete coincidence. A Russian animal (living thing) is: животное, so clearly some connection between "живот" and living. Indeed, "life" is "жизнь", so same root, presumably. To me, it's not completely illogical that the stomach should be linked with life. In fact, this has helped me learn the word! If it IS a complete coincidence, it's a lucky one, because somehow the connection has always made sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Wiktionary is your friend. Apparently they all come from the same Proto-Slavic root. In East Slavic languages it became stomach, and in South and West Slavic it became life, except for Sorbian (NOT Serbian) in which it is also stomach. And furthermore it's apparently connected to Latin vita and Greek bio-.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giacomo1729

In italian vita means life, but also means waist...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angamar

yep, in Serbian, animal is животиња...damn, etymology is so fun...and yet, in order to stay alive, you need to have a full stomach :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pyglik

In polish "żywot" means life (a little bit archaic, but still used in some cases), but historically it also meant belly or womb. For example in the prayer to Mary we say "błogosławiony owoc żywota Twojego, Jezus". I always thought that the two words are connected, because we are all born from woman's womb and it starts our life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKB91
  • 1579

животное is from жив-> жить(to live), to have soul, have life

'animal' from latin 'animo' - to have soul - to live, have life


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gwenci

Actually, in Old Russian ‘живот’ used to mean ‘life’, too. This usage remains in some set expressions like “не щадя живота своего” – “without regard to one’s own life” (lit. “without sparing one’s life”).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanHarlok

Do you not use "želudac" at all, like they do in Croatia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dvvdvvdvvdvv

We do, "желу́док" (that thing inside your "живо́т" that does a lot of food (in) digestion).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maslanov

Serbian also has фер meaning fair I think. Fascinating, I know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanHarlok

The same is Croatian, but želudac is the word used for stomach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas.Gideon

In czech the same - život (живот) means life. And žaludek (жадудэк) means stomach. This is wierd for me becouse: (animal) животное / живот - ное We say in czech mostly zvíře but also we often say živočich(живочих) Život - čich

So animal goes from život(живот) here and in russia it seems the same way for the first time but well - stomach ok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ncolvin

Shouldn't "I have stomach ache" be accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mightypotatoe

You still need an article but stomach ache as two words is correct. Report it if it isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

I am with you on this one, mightypotatoe. Never in my life have I heard someone say they had some sort of "ache" without "a" or "an" preceding it. As a native speaker, it does not sound natural to me at all to exclude it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

I wouldn't use an article, personally. I think it's quite acceptable to say: "I have back ache", "I have stomach ache" etc. For some reason, I always use an article with "headache", but I also write it as one word, so maybe that's the subtle difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

I'm going to back up Tina in Bristol here. I personally would use an article but it sounds OK without. Perhaps not using an article is a British thing, that would explain why it sounds normal without being what I would say (American in Scotland).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justinbrisk

Yes - I agree with Tina. I have stomach ache is just as natural English as I have a stomach ache. And I believe the former is used more often.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

Thank you. I was beginning to think I'd been saying a really odd thing for years, and nobody had corrected me. But the language we use is in turn derived from what we hear in common usage. I'm sure I wouldn't have got to 49, and not noticed I say something differently to everyone else. It's common in the UK. I have no way of knowing about the rest of the English-speaking world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saxmund

Russians must really struggle to get their heads round articles, especially when two standard varieties of English use them differently


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saxmund

It's certainly true that we sometimes don't use definite articles when an American would. Eg I'm going to hospital. And I would never spell stomach ache as one word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedSandila

I found it odd as well, and I'm Canadian. So I asked my wife and she spelled it as one word. OK, that is the fun of Canadian English. We are politely flexible. I did see this explanation on line.

Stomachache, like headache, is a countable noun in American English. In American English we almost always use a determiner (article, demonstrative pronoun, possessive pronoun) before count nouns such as these two words. ... In British English, it is spelled 'stomach ache' and is a mass noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

In American English, one has "a stomach ache", "an ache in the back (or elsewhere)" - but can also have "stomach pain" or "back pain". There is something about the word "ache" - it is more specific and more localized than "pain", which is more general. Because of it's specificity, it becomes a "thing" which requires an article in American English.

Also, British English seems to dispense with articles in ways that American English doesn't. We go to the hospital, not to hospital, for example.

Those are just differences in a common language. No value judgement to them at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

Yes. American English and British English have had centuries to diverge from their common roots. Neither is wrong, and neither is better than the other. They are merely different, and they may well eventually evolve into separate languages, as, for example, Latin evolved into the Romance language family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiachra691900

If you put on a Spanish accent, your way sounds fine hehe "eh amigo, I have backache since I leave Madrid"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

Thinking about it in more depth (not that this seems a particularly fruitful line of thought), I don't think I'd say: "I have", either, but rather: "I've got".

So: "Are you OK today?" "No, I've got backache!"

I don't think that sounds odd or foreign at all, and I wouldn't think it odd or foreign coming from anybody else.

I notice I instinctively wrote it as one word, here. It's hard to tell how you would write something, when it's far more common to say it than to write it.

But I genuinely get backache quite a lot (ha, still not a backache), so it's a phrase I use quite commonly.

The classic sicknote people give to their employers typically just says: "backache" (as a generic condition), just as you might write: "bronchitis", not that they have a backache.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikkife

Is stomachache really one word l. I have never seen it that way before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

One word is preferable, at least in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyGoat8

"i have a pain in my stomach" should be accepted. I know "stomachache" is the official term, but i personally say "pain in my stomach" more than i say "stomachache" cus "stomachache" feels weird to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmansenior05

why does мой живот болит not work? is У меня болит живот just a way of speaking I should learn by heart?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

Because it's not usual in Russian to use the possessive when speaking about parts of the body. I'm not sure it's a "rule", as such - but yes, it's a convention you must learn to accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKB91
  • 1579

No it's pretty usual in Russian. Моя рука болит - My hand hurts. Твой большой палец сломан - Your thumb is broken. It is just and only Duo'd bias - about "do not use possessive+noun in the beginning of the sentence".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

Could a native speaker confirm or disprove this statement? (If you are in fact a native speaker, please feel free to explain yourself.) ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKB91
  • 1579

I am the native speaker. You may translate it like 'Мой живот болит' or 'У меня болит живот'. Both are usual in Russia and appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ77312

For some reason that I can't explain, it only sounds natural to say "have stomach pain" or "have a stomach ache" but not the other way around (US native).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/10Zd2

Why I have pain in my stomach is not correct ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elyakiwi

I also translated "I have pain in my stomach." Can someone confirm if this should be accepted or explain why it is incorrect please? Thank you! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oberoth-SGA

I have a pain in my stomach is a good translation, but it's not accepted. I reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKB91
  • 1579

''pain'' is uncountable noun, thus "a pain" is a mistake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

It's either countable OR uncountable; you can certainly have a pain (native UK speaker here).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"(a) stomache ache" is an English idiom. It means "pain in the stomach", but it's just the way such pain is commonly expressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessHarrison0

why isnt "i have stomach pain" accepted? stomach ache and stomach pain are the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Don163650

Actually no, ache and pain are not the same. An ache is a low grade pain. As opposed to a sharp pain. An ache is never severe pain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael880308

Why do we use the dative(?) construction, instead of a possessive adjective?

By which I mean this sentence looks like it literally means "at me hurts a stomach", when presumably we could construct a sentence that literally means "my stomach hurts"? («мой живот болит»?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeyRadles

I can't say "I know" the answer to this question, but I can attempt a rough guess...болит is the 3rd person singular conjugation of the verb "болеть" meaning "to ache". (Note that there is another conjugation set for this verb (see https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/болеть) that means "to be sick", they aren't the same verb, there are actually two for which the infinitive is spelt exactly the same.) Now because Russian uses the case system to denote the subject and object of a verb (the direct object is placed in the accusative case), in your sentence above, there is nothing to suggest that "my stomach" is the object of the verb "болеть" as well as the subject. (Russian normally uses reflexive verbs in such circumstances, but that wouldn't feel right in this case as it would translate kind of like "My stomach aches itself" which seems weird to me anyway.) So I think that's why. It could also have something to do with this word (as discussed above if I remember rightly) being derived from an early related Slavic language, and this construction may have carried through the "ages" as it were.

And that's the best explanation I have for you! Hopefully someone will come along and prove me completely wrong, and/or improve on my explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa.X

Sorry Brits, Duo almost exclusively prefers the U.S. dialect. "I have stomache ache," will instantly peg you as a foreigner. Perhaps, someday there'll be an American English for Brits course, and then, vice versa. ("Two great nations separated by a common language!" - W. Churchill)

Unless anyone here is a great Slavic linguistics scholar, we can guess why, but thats just how Russian expresses the idea of pain in the body. (Here's a guess, culturally, -- we Russians aren't wimps! Its not me; it's just the stomache that hurts!)

I used to sing in a Русский народный хор. Ill never forget this lyric that tells us that, at least in the past, heavy drinking was a major part of the national culture:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa.X

(I've just learned that there's a limit on comment length.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa.X

"Оt бутылки вина не болит голова, а болит у того не пъёт ничего!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceWater2

So why not "I have a sore stomach"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

That would be «У меня воспалённый живот.»


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFinkie

Perhaps that is a better translation, but since "у меня болит живот" can't translate perfectly into English, "I have a sore stomach" is still the closest translation — certainly closer than "my stomach hurts", which is a completely different sentence structure.

"I have a sore stomach" and "I have a stomach ache" should both be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael723586

Any reason "I have a sore stomach" wasn't accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toniab

stomachache = US english again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnakeBelmont

do Russians say у somewhat like "o" rather "oo"? This may help my pronunciantion, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

It is pronounced "oo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnakeBelmont

then that Duolingo woman speaks very very relaxed, I dare to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

Well, just as in other languages, words may become lost or seem loosely pronounced to a non-native speaker. =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnakeBelmont

I need to listen to О vs У


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shkrjab

У меня болит живот — Значит кто-то там живёт. Если это не глисты — Заначит это сделал ты!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

Why was this downvoted? It's a clever little verse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dvvdvvdvvdvv

I would guess, most people here are older than 10.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucia380

I prefer "My stomach hurts me". Is that acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Don163650

That would imply that your stomach is not part of you. Or that it has a will or a mind of its own. Very weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

This is a weird sentence. When I looked up the conjugation of the verb болеть: "to hurt, to ache", several different sources said that 3rd person singular was болеет:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%BB%D0%B5%D1%82%D1%8C
http://masterrussian.com/verbs/bolet_zabolet.htm

However, another source listed a very different present-tense conjugation for болеть http://starling.rinet.ru/cgi-bin/morph.cgi?flags=endnnnnp&root=config&word=%E1%EE%EB%E8%F2 in which 3rd person singular is spelled болит.

Болит does not appear to be a noun, adjective, or any part of speech other than a verb, so literally it does mean "I have a stomach (which) hurts/aches".

Still, your translation is reflexive, which the verb болит is not. And the English idiom - which is very common - is "stomach ache".

So, I'd say that your translation is too far from the Idiom - but it's based on the actual literal meaning of what appears to be a somewhat obscure conjugation of the verb болеть.

I wonder why Duo has presented this sentence, because it is so hard to figure out, even with extremely good resource materials available.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFinkie

Wouldn't "I have a sore stomach" be a more literal translation? I'm certain that it's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"(a) stomache ache" is an English idiom. It means "pain in the stomach", but it's just the way such pain is commonly expressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

There's a difference in the two phrases. 'Stomachache' is generally reserved for saying that it's the organ that's hurting. 'Sore stomach' would more usually refer more generically to one's abdomen in general; it could mean a bruise or a pulled muscle or such, not necessarily that the organ itself is sore. Not sure how this distinction would be made in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

I couldn't find волит in Katzner's dictionary.

I did find болид, which means "fireball (meteor)".

They have to be related somehow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

болит appears to be the 3rd person singular present tense of an alternative conjugation to the verb болеть (to ache, to hurt), while the more common conjugation is болеет.

Do any native-speakers or moderators have any information on this word, болит? As a verb, it appears to cause the sentence to mean something like "I have a stomach which aches".

References:
болеет:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%BB%D0%B5%D1%82%D1%8C
http://masterrussian.com/verbs/bolet_zabolet.htm

болит:
http://starling.rinet.ru/cgi-bin/morph.cgi?flags=endnnnnp&root=config&word=%E1%EE%EB%E8%F2


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diliyecik

An accepted answer is "I have a stomachache".

But isn't it a pain in a stomach?

Whereas "живот" means belly or abdomen. And so "живот" is a much larger area of a body, that includes a lot of other organs (liver, colon, etc).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguaBritannica

Why was it "у меня иногда болит низ живота" in one exercise and "у меня болит живот" in this one? Does it change from "живот" to "живота" because of "низ"? If so, can someone explain why please? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dvvdvvdvvdvv

"Низ живота" is equivalent to "lower part/bottom of the stomach/abdomen", hence the genitive case. And when talking about its pains/cramps/ailments, it is usually used in the context of female anatomy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

«Низ» means "bottom," so, here, it's translated as the "lower stomach" or "bottom of the stomach," which requires genitive to express. «Верх» is the opposite, meaning "top of" or "upper."

Hope that helps! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguaBritannica

Да это было полезно :) Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Don163650

LOL. Bellyache often is a verb that means to complain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenriqueDi454982

Why isn't "i have stomach pain" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiannonMcBride

I haven't had a chance to test if it works yet, but the way I'd usually express this idea is simply 'my stomach hurts.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colin107047

My abdomen hurts. Should be accepted. That's what i as a doctor would say. Живот = abdomen, stomach. My point is that Ithink it is technically correct. The dictionary definition is "abdomen". It is like saying "doggy" is correct but "dog" is wrong. As pointed out above, низ живота= lower abdomen in DL answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

You yourself are a doctor, you say? That may explain why you don't seem to use the terminology most lay people would, when describing where they have a pain. I think "my abdomen hurts" is completely unnatural (for a non-doctor), and wonder how many of your patients would ever say it that way. It would be like saying: "my cranium hurts" instead of: "I have a headache". It might be anatomically correct, but not something one in a thousand people would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jigojavra

if низ живота was translated as lower abdomen, why not translate живот as abdomen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRay1984

"I have pain in my stomach" why not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oberoth-SGA

"Pain" is countable in American English. So it should be "I have a pain in my stomach"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guido506552

As far as the meaning of "stomach" ("живот") is concerned: if it is possible to divide it into two parts (upper and lower stomach, низ and верх живота), it may only mean "abdomen", the anatomical stomach being too small to be further subdivided.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathaniel_Hinz

болит is pain so shouldn't it be i have a stomach ache instead of i have a stomach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzuCatto

Should "I have an upset stomach" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina_in_Bristol

No, why do you think so? Without going into an unnecessary amount of detail, pain and "an upset stomach" are two totally different things. They sometimes go together, but don't have to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzuCatto

They both mean discomfort/pain in the stomach don't they? I don't see them as being entirely different things


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeyRadles

I second/third Tina's comments. "I have stomach ache" is definitely more common in these parts (although I am a Yorkshireman, and we do strange things here...) Haha!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

It's just the difference between American and British English.

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