"Думаю, юг — там."

Translation:I think South is there.

3 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Katie368826
Katie368826
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Ok, I can remember юг because Yugoslavia was in the South, and восток because Vladivostok is in the East. Now I just need to find places in the North and West to help me remember запад and север!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntoineFab

Well the northern climate can be quite severe ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
Nikolai_Novikov
  • 21
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1202

thats the actual etymology I believe, although in russian северный климат - суровый.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nDroae

"Indo-European cognates include Latin caurus ('northwestern wind')" according to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Slavic/s%C4%9Bver%D1%8A

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyJack
PolyJack
  • 25
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1049

Never realized that's why it was called Yugoslavia. Thanks so much for that! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukaVukZrinski

Yup! Land of the Southern Slavs :)

I'm Croatian by the way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
Nikolai_Novikov
  • 21
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1202

запад comes from за+падать - fall behind something i.e. place of sunfall and вос+ток - rising currents (movement?) i.e. place of sunrise

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie368826
Katie368826
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

How poetic :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
Nikolai_Novikov
  • 21
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1202

In old folklore it is common to refer to directions as part of the day so север and юг are respectively полночь and полдень (or полудень) and запад/восток can be replaced by закат/восход (the connection is obvious and thats actually how I remembered it as a kid I think). But not vice versa so you can travel due midnight (especially if you are a богатырь or at least добрый молодец) but you dont break fast in the east.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

So travelling due midnight is like setting out at the thirteenth hour (the "witching hour" in English folklore)...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daddiana
daddiana
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 10
  • 8
  • 214

Север- Северный полюс

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Severnaya Zemlya is an archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, north of Krasnoyarsk Krai. The largest island is October Revolution Island, named after its discoverer, Piotr October Revolution. Maybe it will help.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curanmor

I just wanna say that that's the coolest person name I've ever known! :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

LOL, it's not real, of course. I just read that somewhere - "October Revolution Island, named after its discoverer, Piotr October Revolution." Since then I've never been able to think of anything else when I look at that island on the map, so I thought maybe it would help someone else to remember something :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/POCKOCMOC
POCKOCMOC
  • 24
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10

Perhaps Сибирь (Siberia) > север (phonetically). It seems to have the same root.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1276

While I have heard this before, I very much doubt this connection. As seen from the most populated parts of Russia, Siberia is East, not North.
Care to share an authoritative source?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
Nikolai_Novikov
  • 21
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1202

afaik most theories about origins of Siberia is that it is a word from local tribes (pre-russian) mongol or tatar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HugoBastos93
HugoBastos93
  • 25
  • 25
  • 19
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

I never made the association between yugoslavia and south, lingot for you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRempe
ErikRempe
  • 20
  • 16
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 3
  • 3

Frank Zappa (запа(д)) is from the states - west :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90
elsantodel90
  • 25
  • 13
  • 11
  • 327

Siberia?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/117976
117976
  • 18
  • 12
  • 11
  • 5

Владивосток is literally “Ruler of the east.”

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bdgy_Bdgy

There is a song "Northern Girl" which a Russian group sang at Eurovision. The name of the song in Russian version is "Девочка с севера" (A girl from the North) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqKL3TAWJHk

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguolearner1

How about: : ) Северодвинск [North Dvinsk, a harbor city in Russia] Западная Двина [West Dvina], the administrative center of Zapadnodvinsky District in Tver Oblast.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pasteten
Pasteten
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11

Siberia for North

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YPSILONZ
YPSILONZ
  • 23
  • 13
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 124

север --> siberia

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Severnaya Zemlya is in the north :)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed_Jade

    Awesome !

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rwhaller42

    This is clumsy phrase in English. We would say "that way" or "over there", with "that way" being better. That is, unless you are talking about someone named "South" ;) I am speaking of the English translation, not the Russian. I suppose it could be a situation where someone asks "Which way is South" and one answered while pointing South, might say "I think south is there." That might fit both the Russian and the English, думаю. ;) Still "that way" is much more likely.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickWalton
    PatrickWalton
    • 16
    • 14
    • 9
    • 6
    • 6
    • 4
    • 7

    I doubt there is any case in English where a native speaker would say the South is there. Except maybe during the American civil war if you were standing on the front line between the North and the South.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    But then it would be "the South", not just "South", wouldn't it?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    Really? Imagine yourself looking at a map which has no indication of directions. You are trying to orient it in order to make some sense of it. To me, a sentence like "I think South is there" would sound perfectly normal under the circumstances. Certainly better than "over there" -- you are looking at a piece of paper after all. "That way" would work too, but I don't find anything wrong with just "there".

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Katie368826
    Katie368826
    • 18
    • 15
    • 14
    • 12
    • 11
    • 8
    • 4
    • 3
    • 3
    • 3

    Honestly, I think that would still be weird. South isn't a place, it's a direction. Even if you were pointing on a map, I think you'd still say 'that way' or something similar.

    Pretty much the only way I can imagine "I think South is there" making sense is if there were a place that had been designated 'South' and you were pointing at that place.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TheFinkie

    Well, actually you could simply point at the bottom edge of the map. That would make sense, but it is quite specific; "that way" is certainly a more usable phrase.

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
    daughterofAlbion
    • 14
    • 13
    • 11
    • 9
    • 8
    • 6
    • 6
    • 3
    • 2

    I kept thinking that there should be "that" in the sentence - in both languages.
    I think that South is there is more natural in English. Думаю, что юг - там is what I would have expected in Russian.

    Or am I missing something?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
    Alex_Kinsey
    • 11
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 5
    • 4
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 2
    • 2

    I don't see any difference in using 'that' or not in English. I tend to omit 'that' in such sentences, but others may not. I don't think it's right to say one is more natural then the other. As for Russian, I would have thought the same thing, but I assume the course developers know what they're doing :) It's true though, that in other foreign languages I speak 'that' is never omitted when linking such clauses.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    "Что" in Russian sentences of this sort is approximately as optional as "that" -- both can be safely omitted when they link short clauses.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
    daughterofAlbion
    • 14
    • 13
    • 11
    • 9
    • 8
    • 6
    • 6
    • 3
    • 2

    Thank you both. I phrased my query that way because it was an instinctive reaction in both cases - I could not recall encountering any rules on the subject.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DanHall10

    Re: the comments on the clumsiness of "South is there" in English because South (vs. the south) is a direction and not a place...

    Is there a native Russian speaker that can tell us if it's also awkward in Russian? I.e., would it be better to say туда instead of там?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    No. In Russian there is an ambiguity with юг (север, запад, восток) being being both direction and place. That said, grammatically they are treated as a place, hence "юг там" sounds much more natural that "юг туда".
    A clear indication of direction would require preposition "на": I am heading South = Я иду/еду/направляюсь на юг (the choice of a verb depends on your mode of locomotion). Hence "на юг - туда" is perfectly normal while "юг туда" is clumsy in Russian.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DanHall10

    Thanks! That was very helpful!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/vrknight7
    vrknight7
    • 25
    • 25
    • 25
    • 22

    Why no personal pronoun? I thought they were necessary in Russian?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    No, you can skip "я" (I) when it's obvious that you are the subject, and the first person "Думаю" makes it absolutely unambiguous here.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/NerysGhemor

    Do people use that only with certain verbs or is it common to hear that with ANY first-person present verb?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    I don't think there is a strict rule about it, but it is certainly more common with some verbs than others. The ones that immediately come to mind are "думаю" (like in this example), "надеюсь" (hope), "хочу" (want), "желаю" (wish).

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
    Alex_Kinsey
    • 11
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 5
    • 4
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 2
    • 2

    It's interesting. I've been trying to find out to what extent Russian is a pro-drop language. Being familiar with Czech which is highly pro-drop I've dropped pronouns in some of these exercises without thinking about it and been marked wrong for it. Just out of interest does it occur in the first person singular more often than other persons?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/vrknight7
    vrknight7
    • 25
    • 25
    • 25
    • 22

    Also is there something wrong with dropping "I" in formal conversation?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
    Mod
    • 25
    • 18
    • 6
    • 3
    • 1276

    Dropping "I" is a colloquial style, the sentence is formally incomplete. You would usually try avoiding it in writing or in formal conversations - but not always. E.g., "Хочу добавить ..." - "(I) would like to add ..." is an expression perfectly acceptable in formal speech.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
    Nikolai_Novikov
    • 21
    • 17
    • 11
    • 11
    • 10
    • 2
    • 2
    • 1202

    Too many "I"'s can actually be considered bad manner, especially if you start several sentences with it (as я - последняя буква алфавита) so skipping it when it isnt necessary can be a good idea.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AntoineFab

    I think it's about formality, but also about short sentences, if you have a three word sentence including a personal pronoun you may as well drop it, like in "чочу спать" etc

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolai_Novikov
    Nikolai_Novikov
    • 21
    • 17
    • 11
    • 11
    • 10
    • 2
    • 2
    • 1202

    definitely with auxiliary verbs like "is" "West - there" = "The west is there"

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/vrknight7
    vrknight7
    • 25
    • 25
    • 25
    • 22

    Thanks!

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/brukte
    brukte
    • 13
    • 10
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 2

    The voice here clearly sounds like it's saying "думаем". These text-to-speech bots can be really hard to understand.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
    Jenz114
    • 11
    • 7
    • 5
    • 5

    If only they could've gotten a few people together to create audio files like some of the other languages on Duolingo have..

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Pasteten
    Pasteten
    • 16
    • 14
    • 13
    • 13
    • 11

    I always find like I miss articles in this course.

    1 year ago
    Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.