"Я никогда не опаздываю."

Translation:I am never late.

November 27, 2015

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/acuencadev

A wizzard is never late...

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Волшебник никогда не опаздывает. That sentence is in here too, farther along.

January 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/acuencadev

Really? I quoted Gandalf from The Lord of the Rings.

January 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

I know :-) I assume they did as well.

January 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jomas_45

LotR is very popular in Russia. My Ukrainian friend did her master's thesis on it.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/acuencadev

I'm intrigued. What did he study?

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ThickLikeMud

Это отлично!

May 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dav7nn

Is никогда always with не?

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Yes, in a negative sentence everything has to be negated.

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dav7nn

Thank you for your reply!

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/curanmor

If so, then would removing the не from a negative sentence change the meaning of the sentence or just sound weird?

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Я никогда опаздываю? That doesn't make sense.

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/curanmor

So converting every word to its negative form is a must then? sigh

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MatoReso

Yes, double negatives are present in most Slavic languages.

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ROBAFOCO

An Eselsbruecke for those who speak German:

"Ich mag Opas nicht, die zu spaet kommen.."

-"Opas, die WATT??" (опаздывать??)

June 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernesto1239

Wunderbar

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn

Что-то я никогда не скажу.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci

I am very late here, but "То, что я никогда не скажу" is what you want to say. :)

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Would it be more correct here to use the imperfective and say буду говорить?

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn

Good question. I've never said it, I do not habitually say it currently, and I don't foresee myself ever saying it. Would that count as perfective because not-saying is my intent?

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90

Based on Hercules, I would guess "скажу" is OK.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMWI4WELS6s

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMat85

Wrong. Should say 'То, что я никогда не скажу'

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IwantToLea20884

Should be То, что я никогда не скажу

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/justinbrisk

If a mother says to a child scoldingly "You are always late" a perfectly natural response will be "I never am".

February 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/nextus1

The opposite is true for me ^^

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bono86

Do you think the woman is saying 'аю' at the end?

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ilya.z

There is no difference in the verb forms for different genders in the Present and the Future tenses, only in the Past.

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90

Non-Native (Native Spanish speaker): Yes.

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid

Is "late" considered a verb in Russian? Is it like "being late"?

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ilya.z

Late is "поздно" in Russian. It's not a verb, it's an adverb. "Опаздывать" is "being late"

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/levisjeans9

Is the не necessary?

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90

Yes.

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/IamJustintime

Is the аю pronounced like \ы in опа́здываю?

December 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah_Asswad

Почему опаздываю о не опоздаю?

March 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jin.Lee.

Я никогда не опаздываю I never not late

= I am punctual

Anybody think like me?

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Very similar in meaning, but it's not quite what the sentence says. And even a punctual person can be a bit late sometimes.

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Philaspace

I arrive precisely when I mean to.

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

The meaning is close to the same, but it's quite a stretch to consider that an acceptable translation of the Russian sentence.

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Flim_
  • 1118

I think he's channeling LotR rather than translating the sentence. ("A wizard is never late... He arrives precisely when he means to.")

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Ah, it must be too long since I read that. I have a Russian translation that I'm intending to start on soon...

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/carotrim1234

I never am late is correct

November 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/QuentinTheFawn

I can't say this is completely unheard of but 'I am never late' would be way more common. The only time I can think one would use 'I never am late' is if they put an emphasis on 'am' to oppose someone's statement. Ex.: Jane: "This wouldn't have have happened if you weren't so late all the time." John: " But I never AM late."

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/shaydonsbear

Definitely an acceptable formation, though an extremely uncommon one. To provide a rule, adverbs of frequency (always, never, sometimes) tend to come between the subject and the verb, and in the case of never, almost exclusively. The issue is that, in English, the verb "be" functions as a helping verb, and such adverbs come after helping verbs (e.g. I have never been to Spain; it would be pretty unusual to say I never have been to Spain, though it is possible).

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dgalster

I don't necessarily agree that this is uncommon. It has a different emphasis. For example, "Have you seen the Place of Versailles?" "No, I have never been to France." "You've been saying for years that you wanted to go to Yellowstone. Have you gone?" "No, I never have been to Yellowstone." The first is a pretty straightforward statement, while the second emphasizes "never" in a way that suggests it would have been expected, but didn't happen.

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kdammers

Not quite. For example:

Attract Your Dreams - Page 72 - Google Books Result

https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1490707050

Amber Dayva - 2013 - ‎Self-Help And I never am late—exactly because I choose not to be worried about this. My daughter once taught me an excellent lesson about worrying that I wouldn't have ...

The Widow, and the Marquess; or, Love and Pride

https://books.google.com/books?id=WDlWAAAAcAAJ

Theodore Edward Hook - 1868 I never am late, sir," said the marquess. “ Will you take some wine?” “ Presently,” said Sir Harry; “not having eaten any thing, I " “ I did not inquire, Sir Harry, what ...

Love and Pride - Volume 1 - Page 188 - Google Books Result

https://books.google.com/books?id=ymIRAAAAYAAJ

Theodore Edward Hook - 1834 - ‎English fiction "I never am hot, Sir Harry," said Lord Snowdon. " No, I dare say," said Sir Harry, " but when one is late." "I never am late, Sir," said the Marquess. "Will you take ...

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

The first one, the emphasis appears to be as QuentinTheFawn said. "I know that I will never be late. And I never am late"

The next two are the same thing.

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dgalster

Yeah, but that's old english.

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Djhstegeby

So it seems to be more common in brutish English then.

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion

To be precise, it is used for emphasis as QuentintheFawn said.

It was also used in a particular dialect affected by the English upper classes in the 19th century. The inversion is characteristic of this. One could really consider it an extension of the emphatic usage, as the intention of the speaker was to imply self-control and considered behaviour in all that they do.

Personally, I can't read the sentence without hearing that accent!

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/john.newbe

Brutish ? Is that a previously unknown dialectic or a telling typo !

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jomas_45

Note that the second pair of examples are from the 19th century. English has changed somewhat since Victoria.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/___Jake___

one does simply write this phrase

November 3, 2017
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