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sevdigim.dil.TUR
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2 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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The first means "son." The second one means "My son." :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NukuchAjau

Is that how possession is really shown in that language? I'm not studying it or anything, but I'm really curious. Care to explain?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LangForThought
LangForThought
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It looks to me like it works the same way Finnish does with possession.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NukuchAjau

To me it appears the only modification made to the original word to create a possessive was the addition of the letter "m". It can't be that simple, is it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LangForThought
LangForThought
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It can be that simple. I don't know any Turkish, but in Finnish "my dog" is "koirani" which is "koira+ni" being "dog+my"

Edit: Same thing in Hebrew and Arabic, in Arabic "name" is "ism" and "my name" is "ismi"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maria.nils
maria.nils
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It can be that simple, but it can also be a little bit more complicated. I'm certainly no expert myself, but you can have a look at the "tips&notes" for the possessive skill:

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/tr/Possessives

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Not quite -- it dropped the vowel of the last syllable (oğul > oğl-), then added the possessive ending for "my" which is "-(İ)m".

The parentheses around the (İ) indicate that the vowel is added only after a consonant and the capitalisation indicates that the vowel, if present, is subject to vowel harmony: four-way vowel harmony in this case since it is an İ rather than an E, so it can be any of -i- -ı- -o- -u-.

After the "o" in the first syllable, the appropriate form is "u", so you get oğl-u-m "my son".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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Yes, this is how possession is shown in Turkish. And all other declensions. And cases. And a myriad of other things.

Turkish may be both one of the languages with the shortest words (dictionary-wise) and with the longest words. I feel that it has a surprising number of words with only two or three letters, but if you read a newspaper, you will rarely find words under ten or fifteen characters.

This is what agglutination means.

Example: ev means 'house'. 'My house' is evim. 'In my house': evimde. 'I am in my house': Evimdeyim. (Alex, correct me if I'm wrong, will you...) :-)

It is a fascinating language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NukuchAjau

I'd like to thank you and everyone else for their informative answers . I guess it was first off a little weird to me because I have never seen a language where possesion is shown at the end if a word, instead of being a prefix or a word itself.

I guess the shortness is not so weird to me. In Nahuatl to show possession, you can usually add a two letter prefix to the beginning of the word, like Notoca (my name, from toca/name).

The language is very fascinating I do agree, and im very glad you shared with me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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Do you speak Nahuatl? I just read about it on Wikipedia. Apparently, words like 'chocolate', 'avocado', 'tomato' all have a Nahuatl root!

Does it have any relation to Guarani (the first American language on Duolingo)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NukuchAjau

Nahuatl has absolutely no relation with Guarani. Yes, we get many words from Nahuatl! I don't speak it fluently, but fairly. I post lessons on duolingo every once in a while.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sevdigim.dil.TUR
sevdigim.dil.TUR
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is this an exception/irregular

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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It's one of a number of two-syllable words which drop the vowel of the second syllable when adding a suffix that ends in a vowel.

So, yes, it's irregular, but it's regularly irregular :)

Another example is fikir - fikrim (my idea). Several body parts do this as well (ağız - ağzım "(my) mouth", omuz - omzum "(my) shoulder"; burun - burnum "(my) nose").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sevdigim.dil.TUR
sevdigim.dil.TUR
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the best answer teşekkür ederim

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ecerayse

'Oğlum' officially is 'benim oğulum (my son)'. You can drop the 'benim' part and it would give the same meaning. Just to make things clear to everyone, I want to conjugate the possesion "verb" in Turkish. Remember, that you do not have to use the 'benim', 'senin' part.

benim oğlum (my son) senin oğlun (your son) - informal onun oğlu (his/her son)

bizim oğlumuz (our son) sizin oğlunuz (your son) - formal / plural onların oğlu (their son)

2 years ago