"Мне всегда не хватает времени."

Translation:I never have enough time.

3 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zag2art
zag2art
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In Russian we more often speak: мне никогда не хватает времени than мне всегда не хватает времени

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victor.mor18
victor.mor18
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Good to know, thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MortiBiRD

Thanks, I already wondered why никогда was missing in this negated sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victor.mor18
victor.mor18
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Why всегда instead of никогда?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordan185047

That's what I was thinking. In English, you woudn't say I always don't have enough time

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
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That's a good point. Не хватать is a staple combination to express that you lack something or do not have enough. Also, "always"/"never" are fairly open to interpretation.

Usually what happens when you have consistent negation (in Russian) is that you replace English any-words with Russian ни-words. I think this is why the choice of всегда/никогда is not automatic for negative sentences. Sometimes you can use both, like in this sentence (всегда sounds a bit stronger).

  • you can, by the way, use постоянно ("constantly, always") and avoid this problem altogether.
  • if you have other "variables" you should decide whether you use the positive or negative sentence structure. It will either be "Никому никогда не хватает времени" or "Всем всегда не хватает времени".

In this particular situation "lack" is a singular, established meaning. Statistically, всегда is about two or three times more common with не хватает and не хватало. Both are possible, though. Now, what happens if you use this substitution in "I never eat them"?

  • Я никогда их не ем. = I never eat them. (neutral and fairly generic)
  • Я всегда их не ем. = I always do not eat them (like, literally every single moment—or you are habitually presented with the choice and make the decision to not eat them every time).

I wonder how flexible English is in this regard. Are "Do you always have no visitors?" and "Do you never have visitors?" both possible?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan872201

Thank you for this extensive detail. I would "almost never" :) say "Do you always have no visitors?" Also, "Do you never have visitors?" has a subtle connotation of surprise, predicated on some other part of the conversation, whereas something like "Do you ever have visitors?" is more agnostic and more clearly implies that i don't know.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zest16
zest16
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Why not "I don't always have enough time"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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There's a big difference between "don't always" and "always don't". Не in this sentence applies to хватает, not всегда.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrDinkleberg

Which word caused the dative case here for "I" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elise235882

Хватает is impersonal. "To me always it is not enough of time."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanmenezesjjk

That's how russians express possession.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gulpepper
Gulpepper
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That's у меня

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanmenezesjjk

That's true, I got confused. I understand why it's the Dative Case but cannot explain it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gulpepper
Gulpepper
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I'm guessing something like 'the time is never enough to me'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lokillo888
Lokillo888
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можно говорить? мне никогда достаточно времени.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryandward
ryandward
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Maybe "У меня никогда нет достаточно(го) времени"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sgt.Oddball

You can say "У меня никогда нет времени" (or use всегда or even вечно instead of никогда), but adding достаточно (-го as well) makes it sound very weird.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sgt.Oddball

No, you should also add a particle indicating refusal.

Мне никогда не достаточно времени.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanmenezesjjk

<<Можно ли сказать>> would be a better question

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonapard
bonapard
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Мне недостаточно времени всегда. Так можно.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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So, I see хватать is imperfective, and схватить is perfective ---- if we wanted to say, "to seize, grasp." And then there's the second use of хватать (imperfective), with its perfective, of хватить, which has the meaning we're using here, "to suffice, to be enough."

  1. So do I have usage correct if I said, Я хватаю эту книгу, to mean, I am grabbing this book (regular subject / verb / accusative), and Мне хватает этой книги (dative / verb / genitive), to mean, This book is enough for me?

  2. And also ---- in these "sufficient" phrasings with the dative, хватать will always take the impersonal хватает form, no matter what number or person the sufficient thing is, right? So would it be, Мне хватает тебя (and not мне хватаешь тебя for, you are sufficient for me), and Мне хватает книг и диванов (and not мне хватают книг и диванов for, books and couches are sufficient for me), correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoHepCat
duolingoHepCat
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So, всегда не is an idiomatic way of saying "never" in Russian?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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No. Here is not the almost correct translation.

"Мне всегда́ не хвата́ет вре́мени" translates as "I always don't have enough time" or if you translate it literally "мне всегда́ недоста́точно вре́мени".

And "I never have enough time" tranlates as "я никогда́ не име́ю доста́точно вре́мени" or "у меня́ никогда́ не быва́ет доста́точно вре́мени" (it means the same)

Click report next time. I think this choice above has to be changed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D-Shosty

Would this be the same as translating it as "I always have insufficient time"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UgurDaltaban

Why мне instead of я ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRempe
ErikRempe
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Maybe because of хватает, but I'm not a native. Can someone confirm?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
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хватать in the meaning of "suffice" always has an "experiencer" in the Dative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRempe
ErikRempe
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Спасибо!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

What's an "experiencer" ?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
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The one who experiences a state or emotion.

I do not think you should have known this term. Its name is self-explanatory but its use in linguistics and syntax is not.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

Shouldn't it by хватаю here ?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elise235882

No. Хватать is used impersonally (without a subject) to say that something is sufficient. Хватает: it is enough. Мне хватает: it is enough for me. The thing that there is enough of goes in the genitive. Мне хватает времени: there is enough (of) time for me. Я хватаю means 'I grasp/grab'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zombie499410
Zombie499410
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why is хвтает conjugated like it was in the он/она form?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JgPgRN
JgPgRN
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2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JgPgRN
JgPgRN
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This is complicated !!

2 months ago
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