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  5. "Yo no tengo preocupaciones."

"Yo no tengo preocupaciones."

Translation:I don't have any worries.

November 28, 2015

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CScubing

I came here to post this exact comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WCGB
  • 515

If you don't think that's why I'm here, ERES MUY LOCO!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knickknacks12

ahhhh I was going to post this you stole my joke. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liakada316

That's exactly what I was going to say! Btw, dig the profile pic. #lotrfan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonD108

"I don't have worries" was marked wrong. It is actually a better representation of the sentence than "I have no worries."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

I agree -- I've added it as an accepted translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

I don't believe it is "actually better." (It is a little wordy). It certainly is acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffDarby

"I've no worries" is not a typical American expression. "I'm not worried" is much more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

"I have no worries" is pretty typical. ("I've no worries" wouldn't be, but Duolingo automatically accepts "I've" anywhere it sees "I have.")

I agree that it's more common to say "I'm not worried," but that would be "no estoy preocupada" or "no estoy preocupado" in Spanish. (The idea is the same, for the most part, but the grammatical construction is different, in both languages.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindPradhan

Older you get, less you use this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donrua1

I use "no worries" quite often, short for i have no worries


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hhhehehe

"I haven't got worries"?? No one says that. Duolingo seemingly likes to squeeze in the word "got" at every opportunity.

Am I wrong to think that "I haven't any worries" would be a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnV.Wylie

Sounds better to me. Unfortunately I have never been without worries of some sort, so never had chance to say that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idander

I tried "i am not worried" even though it is not a direct translation and was markrd incorrect. I propose this be acceptible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ferro81

No it accepts i am not worried.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coreydragon

Two years later, it didn't for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s-partridge

It's pronounced quickly, but the o is not silent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iTonya

Accepted: I'm not worried. 02-21-2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bamdorf

didn't accept I am not worried 12-2-18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coreydragon

Not accepted 25 November 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D.EstherNJ

"I have no preoccupations." Isn't a preoccupation also a hobby or pastime?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Not necessarily. The word itself gives a clue: pre-occupy - already taking up the space. The OED defines "preoccupy" as: "(of a matter or subject) dominate or engross the mind of (someone) to the exclusion of other thoughts." It's not just a pastime, but basically anything that takes up your mindspace. It has about the same range of meanings in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoredWithDuoNow

I said, I am not worried, and was dinged. If no tengo frío means i am not cold, then no tengo preocupaciones means I'm not worried.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrentaPoole

I used "I am not worried". Why is that not a good translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Duo wants you to use the noun, "worry", just as the Spanish sentence uses a noun as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/transkter

I don't have any worries is a weird way of saying I am not worried. Most French and Spanish uses have for things like hunger and fear so it is weird to not accept I am not worried in this situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lhargr1

I'm not worried not accepted as of March 18, 2019

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