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"La pareja habrá muerto."

Translation:The couple will have died.

4 years ago

107 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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I read this as 'The bird will have died.' Sad, and wrong. However, 'The pair..' is even worse! :=(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Pájaro = bird. Pareja = couple. ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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pajero = wanker ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

That is worth a lingot. The green owl won't tell you that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Snicker! Not sure I WANTED to know that, but it's probably advisable... :-D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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Iin Chile I learned a few words and idioms you should not say. two of them by saying them ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Fortunately, most folks give the foreigners (us) a lot of slack! I've put my foot in my mouth, and they usually just correct it with some giggling.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

T.winkler was one of them related to the word for eggs? Or perhaps a conch shell?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aferry3982

I learned this valuable word in Argentina. Now I really have to watch how I'm pronouncing otherwise I might end up saying the fapper has been flying around outside

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominoD87
DominoD87
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This is gold.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhineasGSquire

Too bad it will have died...sigh

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tragician
tragician
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Pajero is also used to call someone a liar.

Pajero: male. Pajera: female.

However, it's mainly used with friends, since it's disrespecful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linburnlane

Obviously Toyota didn't do enough research.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linburnlane

Seriously? I can't believe Toyota didn't do their research!! LOL!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamT89

Neither did you, because that was Mitsubishi ;)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KagisoTaic
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Easy mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Yep. Just not paying attention. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Pareja for couple, as in people, or in a dance, etc., but for a pair, as in shoes, gloves, etc., you would use PAR, yes??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snowdove

yes. Un par de pantalones. Un par de cervezas. and, I believe, un par de pajaros...assuming that you're talking about two random birds; if it were for breeding purposes, you'd call them a pareja. "Un pajaro en la mano es mejor que un par en el arbol." or something like that...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZannaHeighton

So did I!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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lol -- I keep doing that too! And yes so sad. I shouldn't laugh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7895123G
7895123G
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Snap.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay591500

This parrot is deceased! It is no more! It is a late parrot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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Me too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Me three!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama

I always mix them up

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolGlove

Me too. I keep mixing them up.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mal7798
mal7798
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It just gets worse: It's a couple of birds!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hippopigamus
Hippopigamus
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I did the exact same thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesdangelo

Yes this module seems a bit macabre

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserMcFadyen

Is "the partner" not also possible here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanKing10

I have to repeat FraserMcFayden's question, as I am not seeing a reply that speaks to it. If "la pareja" can translate either as "the couple" or as "the partner" then is there any reason why both should not be correct responses?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T_Late
T_Late
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Same issue. And according to my Spanish/English dictionaries, yes, 'la pareja' can translate to "the partner" or "the pair." I'm quite confused why it's not accepted for "partner."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mievenair
mievenair
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I think you are right. Moreover it is the most likely of both possible translations. I came across this again while strengthening my skills ;-). The first time I just accepted that I was wrong in saying "The partner..." Now I'm not so sure anymore that I was, after looking it up in El Diccionario de la lengua Española.

Encontré algo "parejo" a lo que dice FraserMcFadyen:

parejo, ja. (Del lat. *paricŭlus, dim. de par, paris, igual).

  1. adj. Igual o semejante.

  2. adj. Liso, llano.

  3. f. Conjunto de dos personas, animales o cosas que tienen entre sí alguna correlación o semejanza, y especialmente el formado por hombre y mujer.

  4. f. Cada una de estas personas, animales o cosas considerada en relación con la otra.

  5. f. Compañero o compañera en los bailes. En el baile de ayer fue mi pareja la duquesa (ojalá no haya muerto después)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

The couple will have died by the time I get there to try and save them. Incomplete sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Dec 8, 2014 Even though it does seem to beg for more context, it is a complete sentence. DL presents a lot of sentence fragments, but you can eventually use them in complete ones. Cheers!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aine8
Aine8
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Romeo and Juliet maybe?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philosotox

Is this idiomatic? Is this how you say that a couple is breaking up?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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Either that or a scene from Titanic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

or from the walking dead

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tragician
tragician
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It would be a strange metaphor to use in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwtmarcotte

Is this about "Beetlejuice?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmadAmer4
AhmadAmer4
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I can not find a better place to ask this, I am not a native ENG speaker, so when do you use the construction "will have" in english? like in what kind of situation? and is it common language?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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This is the future perfect, used when referring to something that is going to happen between the present and the future time referred to in the sentence. It refers to a condition that is (probably) not true right now, but it will become true between now and that future time. For example:

  • By tomorrow night, it will have snowed 10 inches.
  • When we go to Spain, we will have learned Spanish.
  • I will have read the book before the test.

A decent overview of future perfect tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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March 15, 2015 - Yerrick is correct. In addition, this tense is used to make and explain plans. Here is a web page with more explanations and even some exercises:

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/futureperfect.html

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estudiantenoe
estudiantenoe
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She says cheerfully.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

Okay, in need of some clarification... I sometimes get confused by the singular noun for multiple items thing. I thought this was talking about the bird because of the "habrá," which would be the conjugate for a singular bird, it, yes? Because I didn't hear "habrán," I didn't think it was the couple because, in my head, a couple is two people, they. I take it this is a case of two people, but one couple, so, loosely, "it" as opposed to "they?"

So, if I said "Pat and Kelly will have died." it would be "Pat and Kelly habrán muerto." because, although they are two people who will both be dead, they aren't a pair or a couple. Is that correct?

Many thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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No birds (Pájaro = bird. Pareja = couple. ;-) ) In both Spanish and English, 'couple' is singular, so you use 'habrá muerto'. "Pat y Kelly habrán muerto." has a plural subject - two named people, not gathered into a couple, so you are correct there.

And yes, it can get really confusing, especially when English and Spanish do not agree on the number for a particular collective noun. Dec 19, 2015

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

I did eventually sort the couples from the birds, and I did give DL the correct answer, but, that doesn't always indicate comprehension on my part. ;) So, many thanks for confirming the forms for the collective noun!

I have the same momentary mental glitch when I run into things like "the fleet" or "the police." Knowing they are singular nouns, in either language, doesn't completely dislodge the mental picture I have of lots and lots of things. :)

Just curious, but, does Spanish have odd names for groups of things, like a "murder of crows," or a "prickle of hedgehogs?" I think it's the "a" that goes with those types of group names, but, I don't stumble over those groupings as I do with THE fleet or THE police. My own personal grammatical disconnect. :)

Thanks again!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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I don't know if this

Murder of Crows...

covers every collective noun you have in mind, but it's a start.

According to this

50 Collective Nouns to Bolster Your Vocabulary

there's at least 50 of them and I have a feeling that literal translations of some of them might get you some strange looks. I would suspect some might use similar but different idiomatic expressions. I have a good example of this in mind, but I'm not remembering it with enough precision to add it to this post. If I can think of it, I'll add it later. In the meantime, hope this helped!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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If I think about those collective words too much, the confusion gets much worse.... :-D

I have no idea if Spanish has odd names for groups of things. Many of the English ones were were invented by the Victorians, probably just for fun. :-D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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I thought you posed a good question so I spent some time looking into a murder of crows. After a few dead ends ;) I came to linguee, which is a pretty good resource for translating phrases, when you have the time. There, "bandada" was used, which is a fairly generic term for flock. If you look into the subject further, I would love to see what you find.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sirenita9

Sad

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MDeDeArMAA

2 days after Valentine's, good one duo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iXPLODE

As in people dead, or they break up?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyYossarian

Doesn't pareja also mean a female partner? Like "ella es mi pareja"? Or is that incorrect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tragician
tragician
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The word by itself is a feminine noun. However, 'Pareja' means 'partner' (gender neutral). It can be used as 'Él es mi pareja' or 'Ella es mi pareja'. Also 'Ellos son una pareja' as in 'They are a couple'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

What are the conjugations of the future perfect??????????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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I have found this extremely useful: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/morir

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresa338405

Of laughter...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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I like this interpretation a lot better!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mohrchen

Could this also be translated as "The couple will be dead?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

no, its a perfect tense so haber (have) is used with the past participle. what you said conveys the same meaning in english but as far as it being the translation of the spanish, no.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Native/fluent speakers can correct me if I am wrong, but I believe that "The couple will be dead," would be "La pareja estará muerta."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jepoja

I took La as being female, aperece as appear, how that translates to the couple is confusing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnowley
jnowley
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Why isn't it muerta?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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It's the past participle of a verb, not an adjective, so it doesn't have to agree with the subject.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtsyWolf

Pretty grim

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarabulic
sarabulic
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NUNCA DUOLINGO! NUNCA ! HAS OIDO???? NUNCA!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anthonyhill780

Lol Thats messed up

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaredlarlham1

this is really dark

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertTudo2

Romeo y Juliet. SPOILER

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vin273616

This is very wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tragician
tragician
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As of July/29. The audio in normal speed doesn't even make sense. Words overlap.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

Why not habran? (they)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Nov 2, 2017 - In Spanish la pareja is singular.

In English there is no such certainty. The pronoun they is in flux, and the couple is most often used in the singular, but you do find those who treat it as plural.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patricia485642

Wow! I learn even more by reading.the comments! Thanks DL family!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MabelMatth

Wierd construction of verb in the sentence.. You cannot say"will have died" . It should be have died or is dead.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Yes, you could if it was a scenario such as, these people are sick, and if we don't get the medicine to them by tomorrow night, they will have died.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexandrovich17S
alexandrovich17S
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Rest in pepperoni

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ForteStrength

Will "The couple will be dead" be the same context?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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No. This is a peculiar tense, referring to a future time, and talking about an event that's in the past, relative to that future time. "By the time you get here tomorrow, I will have taken my shower." (The subordinate clauses are important.) is not the same as "By the time you get here tomorrow, I will take my shower." It's confusing - when are you taking your shower? It's made quite clear with "I will have taken my shower." Done. Completed.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

¡Booboo Búho! The pokey sound file says "Parejas". :/

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alon27175

i don't think you can say in english "the couple will have died"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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I think you can. Sounds OK to me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakeames1

Would have died

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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Habría muerto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constance623643

Your English translation is not grammatical.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuddah
kuddah
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too bad this makes NO SENSE IN ENGLISH i put the couple would have died

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"Would have" and "will have" are different tenses.

They are using the future perfect tense which is "will have"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuddah
kuddah
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I meant to say that you would never hear any natives speaking like that, it almost doesn't exist

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cordell.au

"The rescue teams expect to have the rubble cleared by nightfall, but we fear that by then, the couple will have died."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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"Did you do your homework?"

"Not yet. I would have done it right after school, but I had baseball practice then. Instead, I will have it done by bedtime."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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I'm British and I use this tense, if not every day, several times a week. Are you a native English speaker? If so, where from?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluesocksTN
bluesocksTN
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I, too, have to wonder where this person is from. My guess would be that they are not a native English speaker. The tense in question is commonly used here in the US as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahMacey2
SarahMacey2
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Generally this idea is only part of the sentence. By the time their grandson gets married, the couple will have died. A person might say they will be dead, but that sounds more harsh. The difference may come from mentioning the event of death (which can be a welcome release for the old or sick) and mentioning the future condition.

2 years ago