https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler

Easy solar system lesson in Russian

jsiehler
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So, I was looking for articles or videos about the planets, in Russian, aimed at a younger audience. This one turned out to be pretty good and I thought some others might enjoy it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIBCZio2dic

I'd say it's at about the level of 4th grade science and vocabulary in the US, or perhaps a bit younger. You can click the closed caption button to read along (the text is auto-generated but the voices are slow and clear, so the captions are pretty accurate - not perfect, there are some obvious errors, but pretty good).

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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This is great, thanks! It's super when the narration is not too fast. This would be about for the third grade, U.S., as Russian school starts a year later, if I'm not mistaken.

You also might like what is available from the Khan Academy, and also, which are mostly for a higher grade level but often approachable nevertheless, for instance, structure of the earthly globe or intro to U.S. history; some of the links from these are good, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kosmozhuk

1st grade in Russia usually means 7 years old. Though it is possible to start while the kid is 6 years old.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
Mod
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Starting school at 6 is quite possible: this is what I did. I heard, these days it depends on your date of birth (if you are 6.5 or older on the 1st of September you are in) and whether the school thinks they can take you at that age.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Right. And in the U.S., 7-year-old kids would be starting the second grade.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annie18010

No, Russian schools are ahead of American schools by one year. I know this because when I went to school in Russia, (I'm originally from there), I learned my times tables in the second grade.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kosmozhuk

That doesn't apply anymore. There are different learning programs. So the same subject may be taught at different time and different grade.

Even when I attended school (Soviet Union period, the one and only learning program), there were "specialized" schools and classes with their own terms and quirks. And nowadays there is no common denominator at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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This is a fascinating conversation for me, as I've been wondering about the question of what schooling is like in Russia compared to the U.S., and it's great to hear information from all of you based on experience.

FWIW, note that the video is question is entitled, "Окружающий мир (2 класс)," which is what prompted my original response to jsiehler. The latest thing I've heard on the question is this little article, which (I had forgotten) says the pupils start at six or seven years of age, depending on their region..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kosmozhuk

Yes, I noted "2 класс" in the video description.

But as I've said, it can be taught in 2nd grade according to one program and in other grade according to another program.

For example, for some reason my son's class uses the math program that in my view only fit for mentally disabled people. So I have to teach him math using the textbook from one program meant for 2nd grade, which contain general subjects still not covered by the program of my son's 3rd grade. So, school education pretty much sucks these days in Russia.

And I weep every time I read the textbook for "Окружающий мир".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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> For example, for some reason my son's class uses the math program that in my view only fit for mentally disabled people.

It is no better in the U.S., as far as I've seen. And it was no better nearly 30 years ago when my children were in school. I wrote a computer program to drill my children in arithmetic facts because the schools didn't require the multiplication tables be learned. Not only did the teachers not require it, but they refused to insist on it when asked to.

Could it be that we parents are never satisfied, no matter what the school systems are like? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kosmozhuk

Surprisingly, the Russian course in my son's school is not very bad. Although they clearly lack systematization and have redundant entities (in the 1st grade they had some silly names for noun, verb, etc.)

But the math course is pretty lame. Mind you, I know what I'm talking about - for seven years I'd been attending the standard school and then moved on to the specialized "math"-class. So I know the difference between "normal" school math and somewhat heavy math. Math in my son's course is a joke. They've just finished with multiplication table, while the other (pretty much standard, not specialized) course had it in the previous grade. And in the 3rd grade that other course already has sets. So, some children are lucky to have it. And it's the teachers choice, which course to use.

And not to stray too far from the language orientation of this site - when I went to school, standard school had foreign language from 4th grade. It never was very good course (I was learning French and I can't speak it to save my life), but it was a proper course - with grammar, syntax etc. Now the foreign language starts in 2nd grade and has no grammar whatsoever, just memorizing some words and phrases.

You may be right about us, parents, never being satisfied, but, still, we are more often right than not, aren't we? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Oh, neat! Thanks for sharing :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_Cristian
Don_Cristian
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Hey cool, thanks for the link, this is the stuff I need

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

Большое спасибо!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Oh my word, I just finally started to watch this and it's adorable!

3 years ago
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