"Скемты?"

Translation:Who are you with?

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mal-Tesers
Mal-Tesers
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Surely either 'Who is with you?' or 'Who are you with?' should be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/person11281

"Who are you with" should definitely be accepted (in fact, it was accepted when I entered it). "Who is with you" would translate to «Кто с тобой» if I'm not mistaken and shouldn't be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hexapyro
hexapyro
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Seems it's already accepted, but it's supposed to be the actual example and not the other way around. Is "With who are you?" grammatically sound to begin with?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an_alias
an_alias
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No, it is not. To test which works, replace the who/whom with he/him.

who = he

whom = him

With who are you? Are you with he? - very incorrect.

With whom are you. I am with him. - correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrobien
mrobienPlus
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I noticed this pattern on the iOS platform, where it seems a little harder to give feedback about problematic questions/answers. I'm relatively certain that "Whom are you with" would be the correct English grammar. My sense as a native (American) English speaker, is that informally in common speech, the with who/with whom and for who/for whom etc distinction in English is often ignored...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexroseajr

Should be whom, not who

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weylin366674
Weylin366674
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Really "whom" is generally used only in a very formal style.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/who-or-whom

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexroseajr

Formal is relative to the company you keep. I'm british too. People who use "whom" usually went to grammar school and red brick universities and often studied something related to languages/literature/classics etc, but there's definitely a large subsection of the population who happily use "whom" in informal speech, and among university educated people you will almost never be chastised for using the correct form.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weylin366674
Weylin366674
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Please think about what "correct" means to someone learning English. Common usage is what is "correct", not the rules from a 19th centuary prescriptive grammar. Your idea that "whom" is "correct" as the object pronoun is funamentally flawed, because it's simply not modern English usage in anything less then a very formal style. In fact "who" was used as an object pronoun by Shakespeare, so it's not so modern either.

My use of "one" was intended to be humorous, alas it failed to hit the mark.

If you insist that "whom" is "correct", which is very formal, then you should also to be consistent and capitalise "British". Hobgolins notwithstanding. ;)

What you call "basic correct grammar" simply isn't. Please check any grammar book you possess. I recommend Fowler for a native speaker or Swann for advanced learners of English.

You seem to have misinterpreted my post. I did not defend the company I kept. I pointed out that the section of society to which you referred do not speak as you claim.

I confess to reading books. They do not encumber me. You should try them. The optical resolution and battery life of a physical book has yet to be surpassed by a computer. Please read a modern grammar in whatever format pleases you.

It may not be relevant but, yes, I did wear a gown to dinner. ;)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R_Andersson

So, what does this actually mean? ‘Who are you seeing/dating?’? ‘Whose side are you on?’?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci
Gwenci
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It can mean either of those, given a proper context. But there may be no metaphoric meaning at all, like in the following dialogue: "I’m at a party now." "Who are you with?" "With some friends."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheFinkie

Now if we were being picky, this should be whom, not who. It's incorrect English, but everyone says it anyway.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxvells_daemon

What about: "You are with whom?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_Russian

It sounds unnatural. I think you would only use that word order for emphasis, not as a regular question.

For example: "I am with President Obama." "You are with whom???" [to express surprise (or outrage)]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivergruz777

Who are you with, masters of culture?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielPal14

I wrote "Who are you with?", the exact correct solution, and it was wrong...?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koby676833
koby676833
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Очень забавно наблюдать, как пиндосы пытаются разобраться с этой фразой

6 days ago
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