"Пожалуйста, садитесь, а я приготовлю чай."

Translation:Please sit down, and I will make tea.

3 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SeeTwo
SeeTwo
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Unless I am mistaken, "the tea" should also be accepted, that is, "Please sit down, and I will make the tea."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CTO_COB
CTO_COB
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Sounds right, especially if tea has already been mentioned in conversaion.

Also, without the "the", "I will make tea" can also mean "I will make dinner" in some English-speaking countries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pankrates

The tea/dinner equivalence is really specific to England and maybe even within England very specific to only certain areas (Manchester I know for sure has this expression). Don't expect anyone to understand that in general in English-speaking countries

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CTO_COB
CTO_COB
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It's very widely used it New Zealand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mammothica
mammothica
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It is widely used in England.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dempl
dempl
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"please sit and I will make THE tea" , should be accepted, like "the tea which we just bought", or "the tea from the table" or "the tea we drink every day" etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike716479
Mike716479
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The tea is generally used in England for a meal. So make the tea has a different meaning to make tea (the drink).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I am not familiar with this usage in the US; dempl's translation strikes me as working perfectly well on this side of the pond.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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It's not 'generally' used, though it's often used that way. It depends on a vast number of factors such as where in Britain the speaker is from and even some remaining class factors.

To make "the tea" can very well mean to make a hot drink for the leaves of camellia sinensis, and I'd say these days most people in Britain (regardless of whether they grew up referring to the evening meal as 'tea' or 'dinner') would understand from context whether the meal or the drink were on offer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/netnerd

please sit and please sit down should both be accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andyemanu
Andyemanu
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So is садиться the movement and сидеть the passive (any better term perhaps?) form? And are they "colloquially" mixed up in Russian as well as in Danish (sidde/sætte), much to the dismay of some people (such as myself)? :P

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanSchutten
JordanSchutten
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Essential to know if you're living in any small village in Russia and your бабушка asks you to bring something to the old neighbourlady

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sple00

"Please be seated" not OK?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Sounds OK to me, I'd report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paedubucher

What about "take a seat"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeeTwo
SeeTwo
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That's too idiomatic. On that basis, I don't think it should be accepted as a correct answer.

Edit: I take back what I said; I was wrong. But I will leave the comment here to be judged.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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I don't agree, that should be just fine. It's a pretty common expression, it's not very informal slang, the meaning is the same. What do you mean by "too idiomatic"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeeTwo
SeeTwo
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I'm just using this as a guide https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/take_a_seat

It says that the expression is "idiomatic". The sentence "Пожалуйста, садитесь" is very simple and should have a simple, in my opinion, answer.

I didn't mean to incur your rage, it's just that as English is not my first language so I don't have a great sense of to what extent "take a seat" is idiomatic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Oh, you haven't incurred my rage, just my disagreement. It wasn't me who downvoted you.

English is my native language and I do think it's OK. It sounds fine as an invitation to be seated even in fairly formal contexts as well as normal conversation with friends. Generally only when speaking to an individual, or just a few friends. I think, I wouldn't tell a large group to take a seat. Now more informal expressions e.g. "take a pew" would be pretty questionable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Plenty of people do just use downvotes to express disagreement and that's how I generally take them. I personally don't usually use a downvote unless someone is being unnecessarily offensive (which lambdakneit wasn't) or spamming.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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idiomatic != colloquial (which I think is your confusion)

From Wiktionary definitions page: "idiomatic: pertaining or conforming to the mode of expression characteristic of a language"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paedubucher

When Monty Python is using it, then it's as English as it gets ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paedubucher

Sorry for the down vote, that was from me. I thought it's supposed to express disagreement, not rage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80
craaash80
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"I will make a tea" marked wrong. Is there a reason?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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It's possible but strikes me as (quite) unlikely. It would likely be interpreted as referring to making some specific—but unspecified—variety of tea, a conceivable but sort of counter-intuitive melange of meaning. But if there's one thing that varies in unexpected and not-widely-known ways around the English-speaking world, it's the countability of foodstuffs, so hopefully native speakers of other dialects will weigh in for a more comprehensive picture.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike716479
Mike716479
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As Piguy3 says although technically possible, I have never heard it used in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KalliHild

It's adding a requirement for the word "some" despite there not being the word for it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Without your whole translation, it's impossible to know what the issue might have been. As you can see, there's no "some" in the suggested translation, although it's possible to include it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ModestasGa
ModestasGa
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Why is not good "please have a seat" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I think it's ok.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michael467474

Wasn't sit down садись a few lessons ago?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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That's the ты form.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baleineabosse47

Sit down is also correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MHeijO

the word 'some' does not match the sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Explicit indication of "partitiveness" isn't as widespread in Russian as in English, so including "some tea" in a translation here is a valid choice.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MHeijO

please sit down and I will make the tea 'some'' is out of place here....

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Will you please clarify your actual issue? I responded to a similar post of yours two weeks ago.

Of course "some" isn't required, but Duolingo is not requiring it. The suggested translation is "Please sit down, and I will make tea."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palmik235

its ok without 'and' - that's how it is often said.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I think the Russian sentence would have been ok without "а" as well.

9 months ago
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