1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Thema: English
  4. >
  5. "Er hat eine berühmte Schausp…

"Er hat eine berühmte Schauspielerin gesehen."

Übersetzung:He saw a famous actress.

December 1, 2013

8 Kommentare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raphael2333

wann benutzt ich : He saw oder he has seen ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bubblegod22

Ich kann nur auf Englisch erklaeren aber du kannst es mit Google Translate uebersetzen. Es wird durchaus nicht perfekt sein aber du solltest den Punkt gut verstehen sein:

I've used a different verb because stative verbs like see aren't usually used in continuous tenses.

He walks to school -> This is a habitual action; it is his habit to walk to school. These are actions that happen regularly. When used with most stative verbs, though, the simple present acts like the present continuous (eg I see you -> Ich sehe dich jetzt). We use this tense to also talk about facts (Birds fly, dogs bark, the sun is hot) -> He walks to school everyday.

He's (is) walking to school -> He is in the process of walking to school at the moment of speech. Again, we don't always use this to talk about stative verbs, and if we do, they often mean something else (eg I'm seeing you -> Wir haben eine romatische Beziehung miteinander). This aspect can also be used to talk about future actions -> He's walking to school right now; (future) He is walking to school tomorrow

He's (has) walked to school -> At some point in the past, perhaps at multiple points, he has walked to school. It doesn't matter when or how many times, just that it has happened before. We can't use this aspect with specific points in time (on Thursday, yesterday, last week). Instead, we use nonspecific ones (before, in the past, at one point or another) -> He's walked to school before.

He's (has) been walking to school -> This is not really a complete sentence, but this means that he started walking to school at some point in the past and it has continued up to the present moment of speech and is still ongoing. This can also be used to talk about habitual past actions that still happen -> He's been walking to school for ten minutes; (habitual) He's been walking to school for three weeks now.

He walked to school -> He walked to school once at a specific point in time. There's no bearing on the present moment, or if there is, it's not relevant to the conversation. We often find this tense with specific points in time (On Thursday, yesterday, last week). Colloquially, you may also find it being used with nonspecific points, but this is nonstandard. -> He walked to school yesterday because his mom couldn't drive him.

He was walking to school -> This is not really a complete sentence. This means that he was in the process of walking to school while another action in the past was also happening. -> He was walking to school when he was kidnapped.

He'd (had) walked to school -> This is similar to the present perfect except that instead of the present moment being the reference timepoint, it's another point in the past. So in reference to some other point in the past, he has walked to school. -> He'd walked to school before he moved

He'd (had) been walking to school -> This is not really a complete sentence. This refers to an action that started at some point in the past before another point in the past, and was ongoing up until the second point in the past. This can also be used to talk about habitual past actions that no longer happen -> He'd been walking to school when his mother found him; (habitual) He'd been walking to school for eleven years, but he doesn't do it anymore.

Going-to aspects left out.

He'll (will) walk to school -> This means that at some point, whether specific or nonspecific, he will walk to school. Very simple. -> He'll walk to school next week

He'll be walking to school next week -> Pretty much the same as the above aspect, but more definitive -> If he doesn't check his attitude, he'll be walking to school next week.

He'll have walked to school -> This is not a complete sentence, but it means that he may not have walked to school yet, but before another point in the future, he will. -> He'll have walked to school by Tuesday.

He'll (will) have been walking to school -> This is not a complete sentence. It means that he will start walking to school at some point in the future but before another point in the future, and up until that second point in the future, the walking will be ongoing. This is also used to talk about future habits that may or may not also exist in the present or past. -> He'll have been walking to school for five minutes by the time he runs into the tree; He'll have been walking to school his entire career when he graduates

will have -> often reduced to 'll've or even 'lluh but these cannot be written; it's speech only: "He'lluh walked to school . . . " "He'll've walked to school . . . " "He'lluh been walking to school . . . " "He'll've been walking to school . . . "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vecchiaren

He has seen wird akzeptiert


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia926678

Wieso nicht actor, ist das nicht das gleiche wie actress?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salomee_e

Actress ist die weibliche Form, actor männlich bzw neutral.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helmut540839

Er hat gesehen (Perfekt) - he has seen (present perfect), Er sah (Präteritum) - he saw (simple past)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jrgen377695

Das kann man im Englischen nicht so genau übersetzen. Wahrscheinlich ist in diesem Fall beides richtig.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roland316976

Er sah heißt he saw und has seen heißt hat gesehen, also eben

Lerne Englisch in nur 5 Minuten am Tag. Kostenlos.