https://www.duolingo.com/medicsound

Why does Duolingo lock the alphabet switch after answering a question?

I don't understand why I'm not allowed to toggle the alphabet after a question has been answered. The easiest way I'm finding to learn the alphabet is simply through exposure, but if I opt to answer a voice prompt in Cyrillic and get it wrong, locking the correct answer to only display in Cyrillic isn't helping me to understand what I misheard.

2 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mightypotatoe
mightypotatoe
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I can't tell you why it was programmed like that but if you want to see a phonetic spelling, simply copy the phrase into google translate. You'll be able to see a transliterated spelling of the Cyrillic, just make sure the "Ä" button is selected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
vytah
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Also, Google has its own TTS engine, and it's usually better to hear the same phrase pronounced by two speakers, even if both are robots.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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https://www.duolingo.com/medicsound

Although I appreciate it, it's not a matter of resources, it's a matter of learning style.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Many people here are wondering why they bother with the Latin alphabet at all, especially having the Latin version be the default for a language that will use Cyrillic. I take it you appreciate the Latin version. I personally would hate to have to switch the button on each and every page. It is bad enough that the preference cannot be locked down for the entire course. I wonder if it would help to have the preference in the settings page instead, but I think not for your purpose.

I don't get that learning style makes a difference. You could have a separate browser window with one of the keys (Russian Cyrillic with sound of letter to English alphabet) that I provided you with and the Duolingo browser window on top and then you could check when you wished the other window. You can opt to leave it in Latin alphabet for now if you prefer or learn the Cyrillic sounds. Check for the word's pronunciation in Forvo to see if it sounds easier to understand, but you will need to enter the Cyrillic version. http://forvo.com/languages/ru/

Here is a handy dictionary which can go from English to Russian or Russian to English, but again the Russian must be in Cyrillic. http://dictionary.reverso.net/russian-english/девочка

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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It is bad enough that the preference cannot be locked down for the entire course.

I only had to switch to Cyrillic once, and it has then stayed that way both on the website and the mobile website. So I'm lucky. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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It's only flipped back once for me, I too am fortunate - I was bemused for a moment by how Russian appeared to have turned into something else entirely, till I figured out what had happened.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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You two are both so lucky. It does it to me all the time. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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It probably helps that I've mostly been doing Russian and haven't switched back and forth much, and I've generally been doing other courses from within the app.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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I haven't switched much either. So I don't know why it does it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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In that case maybe it's just the luck of the draw.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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Maybe. Which comes back to me saying that you're lucky. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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I switch between RUS<--ENG, FRA<--SPA, and CAT<--SPA every day. :-) So it's not the switching.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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Which means that you must be really lucky! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medicsound

Because the Latin writings are more or less phonetic equivalents of what would be written in Cyrillic, and my only concept of phonetics is based in the Latin alphabet. Being able to switch between the two freely during a question makes it massively easier to build strong associations between the Cyrillic letters and their respective sounds as opposed to trying to cram an alphabet down before I proceed to the course, and in fact, this is how Duolingo already works. The problem, and my complaint, is that I cannot toggle between Latin and Cyrillic after I have answered a question, only before.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I strongly suggest taking allintolearning's advice and learning the alphabet here or elsewhere and ditching the Latin as soon as possible. The Latin transliterations are only approximations - fairly poor ones at that, to be honest, from what I've seen the transliteration Duolingo is using is a bit hit and miss - and the sooner you learn and get used to Cyrillic, the better. You will do yourself a massive favour in the long run by not relying on the crutch of transliteration, which is a compromise at best and actively misleading at worst.

With the resources available to learn Cyrillic these days, it just makes sense to get this hurdle down ASAP, before you get to the point where you're attempting to learn complex grammar through a writing system that's a poor approximation of the actual language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Who said anything about cramming? A list of what equals what is highly useful to refer to. The problem that I have with the Latin alphabet is that some Cyrillic sounds do not have an equivalent in English, so I find some of what they use to represent the Cyrillic to be misleading. Don't worry the Pinyin for Chinese is much, much worse - Latin letters to mean different sounds than the English Latin letters. You may want to check the IPA for the Russian letters and compare them to the IPA for English letters. The International Phonetic Alphabet is at least consistent. So, you have to learn what sounds the Latin letters stand for, because sometimes the sounds don't seem to coincide with the Latin letters of English.

I highly recommend the videos in this course which explain in detail how to pronounce some of the letters which we just don't have in English. https://www.memrise.com/login/?next=/course/78454/learn-basic-russian/ (memrise is free) I really found this a good system to learn the alphabet and the hard / soft pronunciation video is in level 4. Level 1 introduced 16 letters. Level 2 used them in words. Level 3 introduced the rest of the letters. The video above that is called Learn to read Russian in 2 hours starts giving small words with just 2 letters and adds another letter making words with the 3 letters and so on. You might be pleasantly surprised.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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Speaking of lists of what equals what, I recommend russianlessons.net and mylanguages.org. I found them to be very helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature

No-one's asking for for it to have to be switched back and forth. What's being requested is the ability to switch back and forth on an already answered question. Naturally if you prefer to keep it on one or the other it should respect that preference.

2 years ago
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