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Use of "emparedado"

My understanding of this word is that it means to be "sandwiched" between two things rather than a sandwich itself. I've also noticed that I've never heard this word used in Spain or Latin American Spanish to refer to a sandwich. Instead, I've heard both "un sandwich" and "una torta." Can someone explain to me a little more about how/when this word is used. Maybe it's a type sandwich?

5
4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

it is a very obscure word for 'sandwich' that Duo, for some reason, has chosen to use. Do a search here on Duo and you'll find many lengthy discussions.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/framareci
framareci
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In Spain we tend to use sandwich when "pan de molde" (sliced bread: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_de_molde) is used to make it. If a portion of a baguette (http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baguette) or "viena de pan" (Vienna bread) is used instead, then we call it "bocadillo". Here you can find more details and some delicious examples: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bocadillo_%28pan%29. And here in English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bocadillo.

"Emparedado" is not used very often in Spain. Some bars have special types of "emparedados", which tend to be small (served in "tapas"). The word "emparedado" comes from "pared" (wall), and literally means something like "between walls", referring to the two pieces of bread.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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I actually saw "emparedado" in real life. WOOT. I was watching Plaza Sesamo, and lo and behold, the muppets said "emparedado". Sadly, I squealed in joy.

I'm wondering if "emparedado" might be a formal word for sandwich and that that might be the reason it would show up in the kids show rather than a more colloquial "sanguich"

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n.gratton
n.gratton
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I lived in the north of Spain for six years and don't recall ever meeting the word 'emparedado'.

I've seen 'sandwich' for a sliced-bread sandwich, and 'bocadillo' for a baguette-bread sandwich, and a 'pincho' is frequently a small bocadillo bought in a bar.

On this thread: http://www.duolingo.com/!/comment/4838 lots of DuoLinguists from round the Spanish-speaking world say what their local word is; "sándwich" seems most common, and is accepted by the Real Academía.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

I read Argentine newspapers and in them "emparedado" is the common word for "sandwich", of course they also use much formal Spanish as well as words from aboriginal sources and words from Italy and other European countries. They will tell you they speak Castilian.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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In my life I've heard "emparerado" been said, and I'm from Buenos Aires. We say sandwich, the same as English :/

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

In La Clarin I have found emparedado quite often although the recipe section uses sándwiches.

If I remember correctly I found emparedado in the reviews of restaurants and bars.

By the way, I'm fascinated by Argentina. In many ways it and USA are mirror images of each other.

I didn't know until recently that BA has more theaters than any other city, more steak houses than Dallas and more pizza joints than New York.

Now about your political system....

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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I don't know, from now on I'll pay more atention to it, but I never read it nor heard it before.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

How embarrassing. the Argentine word I wanted was "empanadas". My apologies to all porteños.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

Jeez, being corrected by a fifteen year old kid is bad enough but finding him a better duo linguist than I am is totally humiliating.

Thank you NickM98. I'll do better.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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That may be, but empanadas and sandwich have nothing to see with each other! No problem, I'm rather smart for my age (?

PS: Empanadas ♥

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samquilla

Just a friendly comment on your last comment below (which doesn't have the option to reply because of the nesting). "Nada que ver con" translates into English as "nothing to do with" rather than "nothing to see with." Happy language learning! I wish this had existed when I was 15.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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I remembered it was something like that, but I didn't remember exactly. Thank you!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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Well, I've never heard someone saying "emparedado" in real life, but "sángüich"!

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebasm90
sebasm90
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We never say really "Emparedado" to mean a sandwich (In fact, we never use it for anything, for "sandwiched" we literally make up words "Espachurrao, espretinao, apretao" (the "ao"s should be "ado"s but since the local accent just drops the D i omit it), I live in the Colombian coast so it's quite common) It's always usually a "Sándwich/Sánduche/Sángüich/Sándui"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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I've been reading "emparedado" discussions for as long as I've been on Duolingo, and I gotta say, they never get old. :D

Has anyone tried "sandwich" or "torta" or any of the other words for sandwich that Spanish speaking people actually use? Does Duo accept anything other than "emparedado"? I would hope by now that they do.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshaan96

In Spain they use the word sandwich. Emparedado means the same

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onemorething

In Spain we say "sandwich" too. We almost never say "emparedado".

0
Reply4 years ago