"Ela quer pôr a saia."

Translation:She wants to put the skirt on.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
G.P.Niers
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The sense of pôr used here is most likely intended to be:

  • Usar uma peça de vestuário ou de calçado. = CALÇAR, VESTIR

Source: http://www.priberam.pt/dlpo/p%C3%B4r

As you can see in that source pôr has many meanings, but given that we're talking about a garment and that there is no other context, I think that if you meant any of the others, you would use a more specific verb or phrase.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leco59
Leco59
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I really need to put "put ON" in phrases who talk about clothes?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Yes. 'Put' has a very broad set of meanings. The 'on' narrows it's meaning down to dressing oneself in something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seraphimstar

Is there any difference between "por" and "colocar"? In what case would one be used over the other?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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They are the same. Colocar is more common though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ludoviko2013
Ludoviko2013
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Is "She wants to put the skirt." wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
G.P.Niers
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Unless in some special senses of put which certainly don't apply to skirts, in English put without specifiers means either ‘surrender, lay down, give up,’ or ‘to bring to attention’. In the first sense it's mostly obsolete and in the second sense it's to the best of my knowledge only used with abstract nouns like ‘question’.

I don't think pôr can be used in the first sense, although I'm not sure, and I think that for the second sense in this case mostrar or some such verb would have been used to prevent confusion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sblonsky

The word "put" requires an object and a qualifier. "Put it down." You can use "put" with the following qualifiers: on/in/into/at/to/up/up with/down/back/out/across/away. Each has a different connotation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sblonsky

In English, the word "put" does not make sense without an object and a qualifier.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
G.P.Niers
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You are almost right, but not quite. It is possible to use ‘put’ with just an object, without a preposition. Sample sentences:

Well, when you put it like that, it does seem silly.

To put the question more precisely, what vocal reality underlies the typographical convention of stopping at the right margin and returning to the left margin?

Whereupon, in spite of the bitter resentment of the people, and the menaces of several influential citizens, he refused to put the question, esteeming it of greater importance faithfully to abide by the oath which he had taken, than to gratify the people wrongfully, or to screen himself from the menaces of the mighty.

To put the matter more briefly, then, we will say that the eggs of these insects are simply little liquid masses, usually of a colourless substance, surrounded by a horny and flexible covering.

Charles Darwin put it most pithily in The Descent of Man when he wrote, ‘Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.’

The glasses being unable to decide the point, their owner had to put the question bluntly: ‘Are you a boy or a girl?’

To put the idea more generally, suppose that we have an unlimited or infinite number of cases, a first case, a second, a third, and so on.

I couldn't have put it better myself.

As a bonus, here are a few examples of use with a preposition you didn't list:

The victim has been unable to put the matter behind her because you were on the run.

All right, I'll put the matter before him.

Saying ‘I am Gaullist’ put you above all suspicion and criticism.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlreis
rlreis
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"Pôr" can be used in the second sense as in "pôr em questão". The first sense indeed cannot be used.

In this sample phrase in particular, the only possilbe meanings for "pôr a saia" are either "put the skirt on." or "put the skirt [somewhere]" where the 'somewhere' is given by context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
G.P.Niers
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That was not the sense I was talking about. There's a difference between ‘putting into question’ and ‘putting a/the question’.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlreis
rlreis
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"Pôr em questão" = "put in question".

"Pôr uma questão" = "put a question".

"Bring attention to" could mean either in my view.

Btw, I don't see how to use "mostrar" for this. "Colocar uma questão", for instance, I could see being used, however.

Finally, to make matters worse, "pôr em questão" could conceivably be used as "put in discussion", meaning raising a question for debate, similar to some uses of "put a question".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
G.P.Niers
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The difference is between focussing attention to an certain question, or taking something and putting it in question, that is to say to cast doubt on it or to put it up for discussion.

Regarding ‘mostrar’, I was still thinking about skirts there:

in this case mostrar or some such verb would have been used

Remember that this whole discussion only got started because someone asked if it was possible to leave out ‘on’ in the English translation. But as I said, that sense of ‘put’ isn't normally used with skirts.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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it's correct with another meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ludoviko2013
Ludoviko2013
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Sorry, I understand what "to put the skirt on" means. What means "to put the skirt", in contrast?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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I thouht about putting something in/on/at some place, but not the same as "to wear" somehing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ludoviko2013
Ludoviko2013
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So "she puts the skirt" without any further word is just meaningless, it seems.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
Davu
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On the other hand "Ela quer pôr a mesa" (literally "She wants to put the table") is meaningful: "She wants to set the table".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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yes, agreed =)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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=)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/todji

It makes sense as the answer to a question.

Q: What does she want to put in the suitcase?

A: She wants to put the skirt.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sblonsky

"To put the skirt' is an incomplete sentence. It makes no sense in English.

2 years ago
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