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  5. "Ella comienza mañana."

"Ella comienza mañana."

Translation:She starts tomorrow.

January 9, 2013

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pedicularis

Aaaaand I lost a heart because I read mañana as manzana, which made NO sense but I typed it anyways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angtiffany

I thought that too at first! My brain kinda cursorily interpreted it as "eating apple"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

Same here, I spent a few moments trying to puzzle out the unusual conjugation of comer. Brings this to mind: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typoglycemia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Acorn52

Omg me too! I did exactly that until i realised mañana has a ñ and manzana has z lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blockeegle

I read it like that at first as well, but I didn't mess up because I learned from a mistake in an earlier lesson where I thought "manana" was "manzana" (sorry about the lack of accents, my keyboard has no accents whatsoever.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleAdri1

Same mistake except I reread it like a thousand times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smellyeye

would ''ella empieza manana'' also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilsaric

Yes, I believe that's correct, I've seen examples around the net :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martinsisgod

Is there a reason why "she commences tomorrow" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TamaCara

Because no one else thought if it yet? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dreamer71

It's not as commonly used in English, but should be accepted. Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bexando1

it is used fairly often in English where I am from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/larksong4

sorry martinisgod I didn't see your post


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikosei

since she is not starting yet why is it not acceptable to answer "she will start tomorrow"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiltonDelshaan

I was thinking the same thing. I actually speak Spanish really well and I'm only playing this just for the heck of it. I was thrown off when I was counted wrong for translating it that way.

"She'll start tomorrow." or "She will start tomorrow." should be a perfectly acceptable translation for this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/digodk

Maybe because duolingo uses "She'll start tomorrow" as a translation for "Ella vas a comienzar manana". This is true for portuguese so I figured it should be the same in spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathchoo

Future tense is covered in a separate lesson.
This lesson is specifically for present tense, and DL usually expects us to keep the translations in the same tense, even if not really used in conversation. So, it is probably best to stick to that for now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/syrstes

why is she 'begins tomorrow' incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophidiri

I usually use empezar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurLove

What about "She starts the morning?" For instance, "Ella comienza la mañana con la leche." (She starts the morning with the milk.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solenoid.android

la manana is the morning, manana is tomorrow (someone posted that on another question). sorry for lack of tilde


[deactivated user]

    I thought it was "she begins in the morning." So that's a help to know the "la" differentiates between morning and tomorrow


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

    You answered your own question. You changed it from 'empieza mañana' to 'empieza la mañana...' So no, this sentence doesn't mean 'the morning' but your sentence does. They are not the same.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

    How would the Spanish say 'she starts tomorrow morning'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilsaric

    I guess "Ella comienza mañana temprano." or maybe "Ella comienza mañana por la mañana."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickyWebb

    why is "it starts tomorrow" wrong? I thought Ella could mean she or it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

    ella is SHE, not IT. It, is for an object or an animal


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickyWebb

    so what word would you use for "it starts tomorrow"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

    eso comienza mañana


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLopez951661

    Esta mal la respuesta


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteNel

    Does DL teach everyday spanish? Reason i ask is because some of the translations are not the same as other spanish apps i have seen. For instance..Mucho gusto on DL means nice to meet you but on othet apps nice to meet you is not mucho gusto..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benzy911

    she took my sugar again! this time it happened early in the morning without my permission woaaaw!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorettaFac2

    As far as i know simple present in English has a very limited use. You hardly ever use it with future meaning


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Penny1945

    I'm unsure as to why in DL Spanish you can't use the present tense of "she/he/it is starting" whilst in DL French and Italian you can. It is certainly one aspect of the present tense in English e.g. I start, I am starting, I do start. is there a valid grammatical explanation ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dani281...

    I heard "ella come una manzana" XD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8luvbug

    Manana sounds like mayana


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miwade

    Wouldn't "She starts in the morning" also be correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greetasdf

    What would "she starts in the morning be"? Ella cominsce en ea manana?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ian.dass

    Why is "she commences tomorrow" not correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Supergirl__2004

    This does not make sence XD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robse3

    Why not "She starts in the morning" or "She starts in the future"? Since duolingo shows "Future, Tomorrow and Morning" as translations for "Manana".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

    "La mañana" means "the morning"; "el mañana" means "the future" - this is less common, I don't think we see it in Duolingo. But "mañana" by itself as an adverb only means tomorrow.

    So, to say "She starts in the morning" would be "Ella comienza en la mañana".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mellamoblan

    So, she's a procrastinator. Cool!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Twinstaff17

    Well, now apparently saying "She starts in the morning" even though mañana also means morning


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnisaCallis

    I got it wrong just because I spelled tomorrow wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanielT856653

    What does she starts tommorow meen?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kitty-Mir

    A good way to remember this is that "comienza" means begin, and sounds like "commence", which means the same thing!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prayercall

    Is empieza used with obje ts and comienza used with living beings? Or it can be used any way.

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