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  5. "Ты умеешь играть на пианино?"

"Ты умеешь играть на пианино?"

Translation:Can you play the piano?

December 3, 2015

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/explainsthefunny

Could this possibly be translated as, "You can play the piano?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1857

Both are fine. This is one of those US vs. UK peculiarities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/explainsthefunny

Well, both forms are used in the US and the UK. Each is asking for verification, but the given answer is usually asking whether or not the person plays the piano while the version I gave is usually asked to confirm that the person plays the piano.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1857

My comment about the US vs. the UK concerned "playing piano" vs. "playing the piano", not the word order. As for the word order, I completely agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

Which one is preferred in the UK, ‘to play piano’ or ‘to play the piano’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mobytoss2

'Play the piano' is the British norm, 'play piano' is a little grating to British ears


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil891051

Tough one, I think either would sound natural in conversation but after thinking about it with other instruments I would probably include the article (the) even if you're not referring to a specific instrument.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1857

I have a feeling (based on personal observations and nothing else) that "to play piano" is more common in the US whereas "to play the piano" is more British.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim258254

Play piano is grating to my American ears, too. I can imagine people saying play piano, but it's certainly not the norm here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samjarvi

Here we have both an Englishman and an American confirming that you don't say "play the piano" without the article.

To be on the safe side, this exercise should be corrected to include the 'the'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

@Phil891051 @zirkul Thank you both for your answers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mightypotatoe

Yes. Report it if it isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuri-Isaenko

i'm sorry, but what about the strict order of words in interrogative sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1857

The strict order in the interrogative sentence is relevant for fully-fledged questions:
Can you play the piano? - Умеете ли Вы играть на пианино? or Вы умеете играть на пианино? (Stress on "умеете")
You can play the piano? - Вы умеете играть на пианино? (Stress on "пианино") This sentence conveys an element of surprise and asks for a confirmation - see explainsthefunny's earlier comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuri-Isaenko

Thanks. "an element of surprise" made it difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil891051

Seems like it might be worth a note on use of 'can' for people learning - умеешь for being capable of, можешь for being allowed to. Please correct if not the case as I'm deducing really!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichWood9

Agree, I have умеешь as "to know". In effect "do you know how to play" is kind of the same as "can you play" in this context. But it is confusing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

In fact, "умеешь" is "you (singular) know"; "to know" is "уме́ть".

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D1%83%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%82%D1%8C#Russian is quite clear that it can mean both "to be able to" and "to know how to". Quite different from "Знать" which just means "to know" in the sense of "knowing stuff".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daadaadaaren

пианино is in what case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1857

Prepositional. "На" takes accusative only when it indicates a direction of motion. The declension of пианино is non-standard (its form does not change in any of the cases) because it's a loan word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twangerke

A piano and a pianino are two different instruments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianFarre19

Do you know how to play the piano?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Seems reasonable. Suggest you report it....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

It wouldn't accept "Do you play the piano?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

I agree. I is not a litteral translation of this sentence but was the first to come to my mind. Although, you can have knowledge about playing piano but don't play it regularly. In that way, there is a difference between 'can you play' and 'do you play.' Still, I think it should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvenReichard

Literal translations are not always the most accurate...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

Of course there is a difference. That's where the smartass comes in. Somebody asks "Do you play the piano?" Smartass answers "No, not very often." Somebody reasks "Ok, do you KNOW how to play the piano?" Happens all the time. In America being a smartass is a fine art.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

Asking "Do you play the piano?" is akin to saying "I can't hear you!". Meaning "I can't hear you very well." or more to the point "I can't understand what you just said." Quite right! Literal translations are not always the most accurate...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Po6Mwd

Just a general comment, but the intonation of this sentance is wrong. It sounds like a statement, rather than a questuon. In general most of Russian sentances in this course are pronounced with incorrect intonation. There is a very clear difference in Russian language between question and statement, and unfortunately this course fails in this regard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samjarvi

Play piano without the definitive article 'the' is just plain wrong. Both in American and British English.

Let's get a few more native English speakers' votes on this, but in the meantime just add the 'the'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/websmasha

Sounds like ugrat'

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