"Jeg har et ærend hos legen."

Translation:I have an errand at the doctor.

December 3, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

"I have an errand at the doctor"? Is that proper English?

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakerrison

Rather than 'errand', we would probably use 'appointment' (in Australia), i.e. "I have an appointment at the doctor" or "I have an appointment with the doctor". I've never heard errand used in such a context.

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

That's the version I know, and since an internet search does not yield any results for the usage of "errand" in this context, I'm starting to suspect that it's a regional variety that has found its way into the course.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahAnn67

Not British English. We would say 'appointment'.

March 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WildSage

Duo is American.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahAnn67

Duo is international.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WildSage

Duo is an American app and website. It uses American English to keep it consistent. There is not enough room for them to accept every answer from every form of English there is. (Australian, Canadian, Irish, Indian, etc etc.)

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahAnn67

Not suggesting it should. But it's always interesting to compare notes with other users.

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Yup. I could hear my parents saying this.

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

Never heard that particular phrase. Guess I still have a lot to learn.

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simonyricools

The most common native form is "Jeg har time hos legen."

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h2alo

I have lived in the US all my life, and I have never heard anyone say that they have an errand at the doctor!! We would say, "I have a doctor's appointment" or "I have an appointment with the doctor". If for some strange reason there would be another point in going there, and I can't imagine what it would be (maybe to finish the magazine article that you started in the waiting room?!!), we would never call that an errand. We might say, "I need to stop at (or run by) the doctor's office to (or for)..."

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vukmisovic

Should "at the doctor's" be accepted as well?

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vukmisovic

I mean, I'm not a native English speaker, but I feel as if I've heared more of "at the doctor's" in the movies and on TV. :)

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakerrison

Sorry if I confused you. You are 100% right - you will have heard that phrase. And you might also hear phrases like "I'm going to my friend's". In a way, it's shorthand for "I'm going to my friend's house". So there are words that we don't actually say/write, but we just assume that the listener/reader understands them from the context. Hopefully I haven't made that more confusing!

And hopefully Simon's clarification on the Norwegian helps more than I did.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakerrison

I wonder if that might require something like "Jeg har et ærend hos legens" (i.e. with the "s" right at the end to denote a possessive); as that is really that you're at the doctor's rooms / doctor's surgery / etc. in my mind. As I'm not a native Norwegian speaker, I can't be sure on that bit, but I think I'm right on the English bit.

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simonyricools

No corresponding genitive form in Norwegian, we just use "hos legen". "Hos" is a preposition grammaticalised from the original word for "house", so it serves the same purpose :)

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kris281463

Setningen på norsk er også rart.

March 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samgabriel

I am American. I would say, "I have an errand at the doctor's."

April 6, 2016
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