"Я хочу кошку."

Translation:I want a cat.

December 4, 2015

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kitty__katya

Я тоже! :)

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/YuliyaKitcune

Без кота --жизнь не та ))) ---- without a cat-- life is not so

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/andiezenemi

What do the parenthesis mean? I've seen that my Russian friend uses them a lot, what is its use in Russian?

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

The same as a usual smiley , maybe :D or xD, only without the eyes. The more paretheses, the smilier.

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/websmasha

))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardOyelade

Something to canfuse my friends with ;)))))))))))

March 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/winxperror

How to say "I want cats"

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Nuept

Я хочу кошек (fem) Я хочу котов (masc)

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/pye20

‧ Кошка ‧ noun declension ‧ cooljugator.com/run/кошка

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/speedfranklin

Super basic question. Why is it кошку instead of кошка?

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/websmasha

Кошку is in the accusative case, or, as you might say, the object or the predicate (for example, I love the cat; Я люблю кошку). Кошка, on the other hand, is in the nominative case, or subject.

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DrageFem

If I understand you right, I could say кошка люблю меня. And with the same reasoning, я is replaced with меня.

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kundoo

You are mostly correct, except it's "Кошка любит меня."

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

love

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/silwilsilwil

Why the change?

July 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/a22brad22

Just as we say "I love" and "He loves" with an 's', all the pronouns in Russian make this difference.

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/David819731

The woman pronounced it Koshko, but is it more appropriately pronounced Koshkoo?

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/R_Andersson

It is pronounced [ˈkoʂkʊ].

[k] as in English king,

[o] as in Danish kone ‘wife’,

[ʂ] as in Norwegian norsk ‘Norwegian’ or Swedish kors ‘cross’

[ʊ] as in English hook.

Do you understand?

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Nuept

кошка - feminine word. There is also кот - masculine. But the feminine form is used more often

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pye20

Мыши! Тише, тише кот на крыше, а котята еще выше.

кот ‧ 109 M ‧ www.google.com/search?
кошка ‧ 44.6 M ‧ www.google.com/search?

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA

you can have mine. JK. I'll keep my koshku.

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/scottled1

As usual, no notes and no clue. Duolingo justs introduces a new word, кошку, like I have some clue. In previous lessons we had plurals so I guessed "cats" but as with most Duolingo sessions my guess was wrong. Learning by stringing together random words. Not helpful!!

December 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mantpaa

Accusative denotes a noun being the object of an action, does this example prove this can even mean abstract actions such as to want a person, to desire something? It feels different than simply reading a book

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

It is indeed different. The most straightforward role of a "patient" is the object most directly and strongly changed by the action of the verb. However, languages use "direct objects" for more than just that. For example, reading a book or hearing a sound only slightly affects the book and does not has any influence on the sound. And still, languages as different as English and Japanese treat their verbs for "hear", "see" and "read" as acting directly on these objects.

However, we start with a few simple verbs like "see", "read", "write", "want", "cook" and "love", which grammatically work the same in Russian and in English.

Given that you are far into your tree, you might have noticed that the verb "to listen" is not transitive in English (you listen to somenthing) but is transitive in Russian. As for "like", the Russian equivalent is more similar to the English "to seem", whereas in English the verb "like" is no different from "want" or "love".

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/thejesusruiz

How do i know when to put the different letters at the end of words, i still havent figured it out

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SnakeBelmont

they are cases. Depends on the word being either the subject, the object etc.

Take a single word, see how it behaves in different cases and try to create phrases with them.

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SierraMcbr

Is there a russian word for "kitten" or "kitty"?

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

The word is котёнок. The words for kitten, puppy, piglet, calf, fox cub, bear cub, wolf cub, baby duck, chicken, fawn, foal are «котёнок», «щенок», «телёнок», «поросёнок»,«лисёнок», «медвежонок», «волчонок», «утёнок», «цыплёнок», «оленёнок»,«жеребёнок» respectively. I hope you can spot the odd one out. Everything else behaves the same, and also ends in -ята in plural (sg. котёнок → pl. котята), which is a remnant of the time -ёнок was not really there.

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomeAnton

Why cant it be,,,,, I want me a cat.

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie687079

Me too, computer. Me too.

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tT933

Haha. My boyfriend was bitching me in the background and I accidentally selected, "I want a girl". Oh, sweet irony! I do believe a girl would ❤❤❤❤❤ almost as much as him... Lol

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/A2Ei3

В русском языке эта фраза звучит бредово!!! Хочу кошку что? Съесть? Недоссказанность плохая вещь! А в "уличном" понимании слово "иметь" означает "иметь половое сношение", а "хотеть иметь кошку" означает "я хочу вступить в половой контакт с кошкой" !!! Кто-то модерирует все это? Кто-то знает русский язык на должном уровне?

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MisterMist10

Can this also mean 'I want a cat'? This example sounds like I want a specific cat I see. What if I want a cat in general?

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/la.alina

yes, it can also mean "I want a cat" :)

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JesseLeona4

У меня уже есть много кошку.

October 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/la.alina

"У меня уже есть много кошек". you have to make it plural :)

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/websmasha

so lucky

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Luap796568

Why couldn't it be "I want cat" as in "I want beef"?

January 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie687079

That's not how words work.

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/genoskill

"I want chicken", you are wrong.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/genoskill

You can say "I want fish", "I want chicken". But when I translate this as "I want cat" is marked WRONG??? Wtf? this is speciest AF.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Kamran502

Koshki, koshku; please explain these :(

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/websmasha

Кошка is used in the nominative (for example, The cat likes milk). Кошки is the plural of cats (for example, The cats like milk). Кошку is used in the accusative, or you can say, the object/predicate of a sentence (for example, The mouse ran away from the cat).

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BAlcaraz27

The sound of "у" at the end of a word is like a "u" or an "o". ?

October 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Normandie15

Я люьлю моя кошка

March 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kotenok19

Я лю"б"лю моя кошка :3

July 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SnakeBelmont

вы любите вашу кошку ))

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/websmasha

What is the plural of a cat in Russian (masculine)?

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SnakeBelmont

Коты. only if it is the subject.

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Gavrilov

А кошка хочет меня :-)

March 28, 2019
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.