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  5. "Musen spiser osten."

"Musen spiser osten."

Translation:The mouse eats the cheese.

December 4, 2015

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

And just a moment ago, I was the cheese. I think the Universe is trying to tell me something...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/addgalaxies

Fun fact: Mice don't actually eat cheese much, they eat whatever they can get their hands on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Mice prefer chocolate to cheese, but it is easier to put cheese on a mousetrap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meRs4G

The moose is eating the cheese is what I wrote with capitalization and I get it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

musen = the mouse
elgen = the moose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ILCHYSHYN23

How do you differentiate between eats and is eating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toasters2

There isn't much of a difference at all, is there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrswesson07

Is "The mouse eats the cheese interchangeable with "The mouse is eating the cheese" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

There is only one present tense in Norwegian, so as long as the situation allows for it you can use either the simple present or the present continuous when translating it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leifenyat

I don't see a "the" anywhere...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Instead of using a definite article, Norwegian operates with definite suffixes. The -en at the end of "musen" is what marks it as a definite singular noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoMo40405

What is "cheese" without the definite again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crispeeblathers

Hi ho the derry o the mouse eats the cheese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tudy1311

He's eating the cheese! This is why you don't offer the mouse cheese, Karen!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elwis922395

Why "the rat is eating the cheese" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ericlmao

Rats and mice are two different species of the rodentia family


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni448272

You probably made the same mistake as me: translating the sentence into English, while we were just requested to write it in Norwegian. It happens!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Some languages have one word for rats and mice. English has different words for rats and mice. English distinguishes apes and monkeys. The French call them both "signes", but they have one word for owls with ear-like tufts on their heads and a different word for owls without those tufts. The English call them both "owls."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rundmaus

The first Norwegian animal acting 'normal' in this course. O.o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daria691469

Why can't I say "the mouse is eating the cheese"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daria691469

Why can't I say "The mouse's eating the cheese"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/retinalpurple

Should be musa if you use ei in front of ei mus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nehryss

No, because "ei" means "a", while the ending "-a" means "the". Ei mus: a mouse. Musa: the mouse. You can only use one of them. If you say "ei musa", that means "a the mouse", which doesn't make sense. I hope it helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/retinalpurple

Hello, we have a misunderstanding going on here.

I only meant to point out that when "ei mus" is used, it should be "ei mus, musa, mus, musene". You can search it up on Wikipedia (en mus bøyning). When it's "en mus" it should be "musen", that is correct.

I hope I managed to make myself clear.

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