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  5. "Анна ежедневно принимает ван…

"Анна ежедневно принимает ванну."

Translation:Anna takes a bath every day.

December 5, 2015

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.franka

Anna here sounds like Ona...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.franka

Thank you for your post. Russian is my mother tongue and I think that the pronunciation here can be improved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lordofsol

Besides, the stress here is on the first syllable, which differs from "она".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.franka

Once again, this sentence could have been improved or other name could have been chosen. If a native speaker made a mistake, I think it is unnecessarily tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexeiRosc1

@lordofsol, maria.franka is saying that she is the native speaker here, not Duolingo. That should be obvious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lordofsol

It's not a native speaker, it's a computer simulation. It is far from being perfect, but it is a general problem, not of this particular sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TahitiTrotsky

'Anna takes a daily bath.'....rejected! Daily as an adjective discussed here; http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/daily_1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1968

And why would you want to use an adjective (instead of on adverb) here?
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/daily_2


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TahitiTrotsky

'A daily bath' seemed more natural to me, like 'a daily walk' or 'a daily newspaper' or, in the Lord's Prayer, 'our daily bread.' A comparison on 'Google ngram' shows 'a daily bath' to be more common. If you substitute 'shower' for 'bath,' 'take a shower daily' doesn't even register. https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=take+a+daily+bath%2Ctake+a+bath+daily

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=take+a+daily+shower%2Ctake+a+shower+daily


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

So, ежедневно is just a more formal way of saying каждый день?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexeiRosc1

I'd say it's a different word with similar meaning: "daily" vs "every day." One is an adverb and the other is a phrase and they're used in different situations (in terms of the sentence).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeroen_Pelkman

Damn Anna, think of the environment please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harry.TP

This is such a bad listening exercise because of the 'анна'-'она' confusion.

Please remove it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike716479

Agreed, I nearly always get these confused. The mechanical voice does a poor job of this pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexeiRosc1

I translate this is as "Anna takes baths daily" because it sounds more natural, however, that was wrong. Would the Russian be "Анна ежедневно принимает ванны" if the sentence were to mean that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexmalaho

Yes, but we usually say Анна ежедневно принимает ванну not ванны.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdmundMcIntosh

What, several of them? I would interpret your sentence as being about having more than one bath each day. And - I suppose this was what you wanted to avoid - I wouldn't understand the original sentence to mean she re-used the same water each day. I think you would have to be more specific if that's what you meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike716479

Likewise. Anna takes a bath daily, is a natural translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

I'm not a native speaker and live in a country where people don't usually have a bathtub. Does this sentence implies that she fills a bathtub everyday for cleaning herself, or this could also mean a shower?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexmalaho

Душ and ванна are two different things. But sometimes Russians use ванна instead of душ, not the other way around.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

hm... just as I imagined...

thanks a lot =D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

The Duolingo app is slowly getting better, it still doesnt have an edit option... I just wanted to add that in portuguese we have the word "banho" which means "to clean oneself no matter if in a bathtub or a shower". My question is related to the somewhat similar pronunciation of the Russian and the Portuguese word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac444706

Fortunately that she takes a bath every day!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianaCan591730

Taking a shower every day is normal, though taking a bath every day isn't ecological...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kat.palmor

Why is каждый день not used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scotnik

I was wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1968

You certainly can, but you don't have to.
Every day = каждый день;
daily = ежедневно.
Both versions are accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stanmann

Anna bathes daily was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexmalaho

I think, it'd be Анна купается/моется ежедневно.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stanmann

Спасебо, мой друг, Alexmalaho.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zhen186143

Why is shower unused?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 154

"Shower" is душ ("to shower" is "принимать душ").

You can also use мыться (lit. "to wash oneself") if it does not matter which way exactly you cleaned up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StavatS

Since 'bath' and 'bathtub' share the same word in Russian, and the action of bathing is also idiomatically expressed using the verb 'to take', how would one say that Anna takes a bathtub every day (from the bathtub store or whatever)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 154

Probably you would use берёт or забирает. Also увозит if you rather mean that she transports the thing somewhere.

Принимать only corresponds to the English verb "take" if you mean bath (shower), decisions or medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1968

And just to add to Shady_arc's comment, here is an example where English "to take" means something rather opposite to Russian "принимать":
In English you "take an exam" as a student;
in Russian "принимать экзамен" (infinitive form) is what professors do. (To take an exam = сдавать экзамен.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StavatS

Is "принимать экзамен" what professors do in the sense of collecting the forms from the students when the test is over? Else in what way is this what professors do?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 154

An examination is often in the form of a talk with a professor. It might go like this:

  • every student draws a short list of questions from the pool ("билет"), e.g., some theory to explain and a few problems to solve
  • you are given some time to prepare
  • then either you go to a professor or he comes to you. After answering the official part you may be asked a few additional questions or given a problem or two.
  • the professor decides how good you were.

Russian universities have entry tests but I do not think there are many written exams afterwards. We differentiate between written tests, multiple choice tests and oral exams. You ability to solve typical problems the course covers is usually determined before the examination. If you cannot integrate a polynomial, you will not even be admitted to the calculus exam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1968

As Shady_arc has already explained, "принимать экзамен" typically refers to oral exams, which are still quite common in Russian universities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StavatS

Quite similar to Hebrew לנטול. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaeZqlUw

Any passable theories on why the neuter form- "ежедневно"- is used here? Ванна and Анна are both feminine. Спасибо большoe!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 154

ежедневно, еженедельно, ежемесячно, ежегодно are adverbs, just like in English.

A lot of adverbs end in о. Basically, if an adverb forms from an adjective, it gets an о: быстрый→быстро, хороший→хорошо, плохой→плохо, внимательный→внимательно, ежедневный→ежедневно.

  • or an е if the adjective ends in -ний, -чий or -щий: искренний→искренне "sincerely" .
  • -цый also counts but I think there is only куцый there. The rest of them are all -лицый, "-faced"; so they do not produce adverbs under normal circumstances ("roundfacedly", "palefacedly"?).

Only nouns and pronouns have a grammatical gender in Russian (only matters in the singular). Adjectives and past forms of Russian verbs agree, i.e. match their endings to a noun they are associated with. Russian adverbs do not change their endings at all (bar the comparative form).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaeZqlUw

That makes sense, thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rumata_

(Recovered comments) 1: In the previous task, I saw "I have a large and comfortable bathtub". Can I use "bathtub" here?

2 Alexmalaho: She takes a bath in a bathtub. The bathtub is in a bathroom.

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