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  5. "Он сейчас отдыхает."

"Он сейчас отдыхает."

Translation:He is now having a rest.

December 7, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OjisanSeiuchi

"Now he is resting" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/russianduo

"Having a rest" isn't a natural phrase. "He's resting," or it's really implying a temporary rest during some longer task or at work, then "taking a break," would also be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

"Having a rest", while not as common as the alternatives you mentioned, doesn't sound unnatural to me as a native British/American speaker. This could well be one of those things that depends on your dialect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rKaic

To my ear (NE USA native), "having a rest" sounds not incorrect, exactly, but definitely strange. "Taking a rest" is better, and "resting" sounds best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woollymammoths

In British English it is definitely correct. In fact "taking a rest" sounds strange to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashcat4

Can confirm in Canadian English, "I'm/He's having a rest" is the only way I have ever heart it said. I have never ever heard "taking a rest", have only heard "taking a break".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

"To have a rest" is perfectly acceptable in Hiberno-English. It means "to take a break".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew359786

"Having a rest" is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"Having a rest" is not common American English. Definitely UK English. There's nothing right or wrong about that, but you will be viewed as odd or affected if you use it where it's not usually heard. It's not heard on American TV for instance, except when we're watching BBC programmes. Fans of Downton Abbey might find it quite charming. I wouldn't use it in a redneck bar, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlegOlenyev42

What is wrong with "He now rests"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woa7dSD5

It sounds formal/literary/old fashioned, but is acceptable grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliedawne

almost sounds as though he died...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkpenguin21

Never heard the phrase "having a rest" in the US, only in British English. Other variations on this should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HersheyNan

American native speaker here. I hear & use "have a rest" sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisTan76

is the are difference between "having a rest" and "resting"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Not really. Both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0g

If he is cooking is accepting then he is resting should be accepted. Also when typing this in Russian I also got it wrong. I am not sure why seeing the word order is very flexible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SzymonRuci

"отдыхать" (to rest) sounds like Polish "oddychać" (to breathe) can be a bit confusing to polish people learning Russian :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolita512004

Я думаю, что слово отдыхать произошло от слова дышать, поэтому звучит похоже. Шёл, стал тяжело дышать, остановился, отдохнул (восстановил дыхание).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rem825463

Curious as to why отдыхать is always translated as 'to have a rest', rather than 'to rest'. I would think the latter would be more common phraseology in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisinikolova48

How do you say "He is smoking now" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

Он сейчас курит.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeddyFint

Havo g a rest????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VonHotzendorf

The verb "отдыхает" seems to mean "resting" not "having a rest".

"Having a rest" implies that "есть" should be in there somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaarNsirli

Why bot he is having a redt now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mehrdad860183

Some times not accepting is silly. Now can be use both first and end of sentence

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